Chipotle chiles in adobo sauce


Chipotle chiles in adobo sauce

Chipotles in adobo sauce are one of my favorite Mexican ingredients. They are ready to be spooned on top or inside of almost anything: quesadillas, tacos, sandwiches, grilled meats… Yet, they are also a wonderful cooking ingredient to use for making a wide range of dishes, from soups to moles, from salsas to stews and even mashed potatoes.  Chipotles have truly unique layers of flavor that come together in a most wonderful way: smoky, sweet, deep, rich and pleasantly spicy.

Chipotle chiles in adobo sauce-thumb-510x342-578

The chipotles in adobo are Jalapeño chiles that have been ripened to a deep red, dried, smoked and pickled in a combination of vinegar, spices and tomato puree.

Yes! If you want to make your own, follow my recipe. However, ready to buy chipotles in adobo sauce in cans and glass jars are a staple in Mexican pantries and stores have a wide array of brands to choose from, each with their own peculiar spin.  Should you opt for buying them (as most people do…), try a couple different brands, they do vary in flavor.

  • cath kelly

    Hi…i’ve been desperately looking for a recipe to make chipotles in adobo. we smoke our own jalapenos, which turn out beautiful, and this is the next step in my cooking process. please hurry up and cook them up for us!

    • Pati Jinich

      Hi there! So great that you smoke your own jalapeños! I will post about it as soon as I can… Many thanks for your note!

  • Once you open the Chipotles in adobo sauce how do I store them and for how long. I have not seen them in jars only in cans.
    Thank you Gayle

    • Pati Jinich

      Hola Gayle, you can store the chipotles in adobo sauce covered in the refrigerator for months. 🙂

  • Hi,
    I just tried this recipe. I have few questions -the chipotles remained rather leathery still after more than an hour of simmering, is this normal? I got tired of hanging around and put them in jars but the chipotles aren’t soft. Also, the heat seems to have died down and it is only mild ly spicy..can I prevent this from happening? I love the heat!


    • Pati Jinich

      Hi Ellie, Not to worry, it’s normal for the chipotle chiles to remain leathery after simmering. They will soften as they pickle. Also, the pickling will reduce the heat level of the chiles some. If you leave the seeds in the chiles, they will be hotter. I’m glad you are trying this recipe!!

      • I’ve been looking for more ways to use my slow cooekr and with my chipotle pepper loving family, I think I have a winner. I sent a link to Michael who promptly responded Yes. Tonight?

        • Pati


  • Adela Rico

    Hi, this looks awesome, however I cannot seem to find the recipe, please ayuda!

  • Hilary Jauregui

    This is AMAZING. I am thrilled you created this recipe!!! The sauce is delicious and was even better when I used this to make Tinga Pollo. THANK YOU!!!!! : )

    • Pati

      Gracias, Hilary! So happy you tried my recipe!!

  • I love chipotles in adobo sauce. I buy and open them into my mini food processor. Just process up into a smooth sauce and keep in the refrigerator and spoon out the amount I want to use in a recipe. Works great as it integrates totally into the recipe!

    • Pati

      I agree!

  • Ashwin

    I need a solution. Once I open a can of chipotle in adobo and use one or two pepper, how do I preserve the remainder of the can so they don’t dry out?


  • Dawn

    I need some chipotle with adobo but I can not find it anywhere. Can you please tell me where to find this ingredient? Thank you

    • Pati

      If your grocery store doesn’t carry it in its international aisle, try looking in a local Latin market! If that doesn’t work, you can order it online! Good luck!