Mixed Nut Salsa Macha

Mixed Nut Salsa Macha
Print Recipe
4.5 from 4 votes

Mixed Nut Salsa Macha

Salsa macha defies anypreconception you may have about salsas. Instead of tomatoes ortomatillos, it has nuts – tons of them! Use it as a topping for avocado toast,guacamole, soft scrambled eggs, or whatever else you can dream up.
Cook Time5 mins
Course: Salsa, Sauce
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Salsa
Servings: 3 cups approximately
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup olive oil
  • 9 dried guajillo chiles stemmed, seeded, and cut into small squares with scissors
  • 4 to 5 dried chiles de árbol stemmed and cut into small rings (with seeds)
  • 8 garlic cloves chopped
  • 1/2 cup walnuts coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup unsalted pistachios coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup amaranth seeds
  • 4 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 4 teaspoons dark brown sugar or grated piloncillo
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt or to taste

Instructions

  • Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium-low heat. Add the chiles, garlic, and nuts and cook, stirring, until lightly toasted and fragrant, 2 to 3 minutes. Turn off the heat and stir in the amaranth seeds. Scrape into a bowl and let cool.
  • Mix the vinegar, brown sugar, and salt into the chile mixture. Let sit, covered, for at least 8 hours before serving to allow the chiles to soften.
  • The salsa will keep, tightly covered, for a few weeks in the refrigerator.

Notes

Salsa Macha con Muchas Nueces

Shrimp Enchiladas in a Rich Tomato Sauce

Shrimp Enchiladas in a Rich Tomato Sauce
Print Recipe
4.63 from 8 votes

Shrimp Enchiladas in a Rich Tomato Sauce

Shrimp Enchiladas in a Rich Tomato Sauce, from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 11 "New York"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time1 hr 20 mins
Total Time1 hr 25 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: corn tortillas, Enchilada, pati's mexican table, Recipe, red sauce, seafood, Shrimp
Servings: 6 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For enchiladas:

  • 1 1/2 pounds medium shrimp
  • 5 sprigs fresh parsley
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled
  • 3 to 4 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt divided, or to taste
  • 1 1/2 pounds ripe tomatoes
  • 1 to 2 serrano or jalapeño chiles to taste
  • 4 scallions trimmed and coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon grated nutmeg
  • 3 tablespoons canola or safflower oil divided
  • 1 cup Mexican cream Latin style crema, or heavy cream, plus a bit more for garnish
  • 12 Corn tortillas
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter

For garnish:

  • 4 scallions trimmed and light green and white parts thinly sliced
  • 1 ripe avocado halved, pitted, meat scooped out and sliced
  • 2 ounces queso fresco farmer’s cheese or mild feta, crumbled (½ cup)

Instructions

  • Remove the shells and tails from the shrimp and reserve. Rinse the shrimp and pat dry. Cut each one into 3 or 4 bite-size pieces.
  • In a medium saucepan, combine the shrimp shells and tails, parsley, 1 of the garlic cloves, bay leaves and ½ teaspoon of the salt. Cover with water, place over medium-high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer 20 minutes. Strain the broth into a large measuring cup or heat-proof bowl.
  • Combine the tomatoes, remaining garlic, and chile(s) in a medium saucepan. Cover with water, and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium and simmer uncovered until the tomatoes are thoroughly soft, about 10 minutes.
  • Using a slotted spoon, transfer the tomatoes and garlic clove to a blender. Add the 4 coarsely chopped scallions; if you have simmered 2 chiles, begin by adding only 1 of them to the blender, then once you taste the finished puree you can decide if you want to add the other. Add ½ teaspoon salt, the grated nutmeg, and 1 cup of the strained shrimp shell broth. Purée until completely smooth, taste and add the other chile if you would like more chile presence and heat (the sauce will become milder as it cooks and other ingredients are added).
  • Rinse and dry the saucepan, add a tablespoon of the oil and heat over medium heat until hot but not smoking. Add the pureed tomato sauce, being careful to avoid sputters, and cover partially with a lid. Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens, seasons and deepens in color to a much darker red, about 10 minutes. Uncover, reduce heat to medium-low and stir in the cream. Keep at a steady low simmer for 8 to 10 more minutes, or until the sauce is thick, creamy, and coats the back of a wooden spoon. Taste and adjust salt. Remove from the heat and keep warm.
  • Prepare the tortillas for enchiladas by either heating them in a comal or passing them through hot oil.
  • To cook the shrimp, work in batches so that they will sear and not steam. Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil and 1 tablespoon of the butter in a large skillet over high heat until hot, but not smoking, and the butter is bubbling. Add half the shrimp and season with salt. Cook for just a couple of minutes, stirring and flipping a few times, until just cooked through and lightly browned. Remove with a slotted spoon, add the remaining tablespoon of oil and butter to the skillet, and once the butter is foaming, cook the remaining shrimp.
  • Reheat the sauce if necessary. One by one, sauce and fill the tortillas. Glide each prepared tortilla through the sauce and place on a plate. Spoon about 3 tablespoons of the seared shrimp down the middle and fold in a half like a quesadilla. Place on a platter and continue with remaining the tortillas, overlapping the half moon-shaped enchiladas slightly. Once all of the enchiladas are filled, spoon the remaining tomato sauce on top. They should be sauced generously. Garnish with the sliced scallions, slices of avocado and crumbled cheese.

Notes

Entomatadas con Camarones

Chocolate and Vanilla Three Kings’ Bread

Chocolate and Vanilla Rosca de Reyes
Print Recipe
3.17 from 6 votes

Chocolate and Vanilla Three Kings’ Bread

Rosca de Reyes is the Mexican version of Three Kings’ Bread. I wanted to create a version for my family, featuring just the parts we love. So why not make a chocolate-and-vanilla marbled bread with a chocolate-and-vanilla sugar coating?
Cook Time45 mins
Course: Dessert, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: bread, Chocolate, vanilla
Servings: 15 servings; makes 1 large ring-shaped bread
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the starter:

  • 1/2 cup whole milk heated to lukewarm
  • 1 tablespoon active dry yeast
  • 1 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour

For the dough:

  • 1 tablespoon orange blossom water or rose water (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon grated orange zest
  • 4 large eggs
  • 3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour plus more for dusting
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/2 pound (2 sticks) unsalted butter cut into 1⁄2-inch cubes, at room temperature, plus more for the bowls
  • 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

For the topping:

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup confectioners’ sugar
  • 10 tablespoons (1 1/4 sticks) unsalted butter or 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons vegetable shortening, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1 heaping tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder
  • 1 large egg beaten with 1 tablespoon milk, for brushing

Instructions

To make the starter: 


  • Whisk the milk, yeast, and granulated sugar together in the bowl of a stand mixer. Whisk in the flour. Cover with a clean kitchen towel, set in a warm, draft-free place, and let stand until the mixture begins to bubble, 20 to 25 minutes.

To make the dough: 


  • Attach the bowl to the mixer stand and fit it with the paddle attachment. Add the orange flower or rose water (if using), vanilla, orange zest, eggs, flour, granulated sugar, and salt to the starter and beat on low speed just until combined. Scrape the bowl and beater and switch to the dough hook. Beat on medium speed for 10 to 12 minutes, until the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and starts to make a slapping sound.
  • On low speed, add the butter in 4 to 6 additions, incorporating each addition before adding the next one. From time to time, scrape the bowl. When all of the butter has been added, increase the speed to medium and beat for another 8 to 10 minutes, until the dough slaps against the sides of the bowl again. It will still be sticky, but don’t be tempted to add more flour.
  • Butter two medium bowls. Remove the dough from the mixer bowl, divide it in half, and return one half to the bowl. Shape the other piece into a ball and transfer to one of the buttered bowls.
  • Add the cocoa powder to the dough in the mixer bowl and mix on low speed until incorporated. Turn the dough out, shape it into a ball, and place in the other buttered bowl. Cover each bowl with plastic or a clean kitchen towel and let the dough rise in a warm, draft-free place until doubled, 1 to 1 1⁄2 hours.
  • Gently deflate both portions of dough with your fist and shape into balls again. Cover and let rise in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours, or for as long as overnight.
  • Remove the dough from the refrigerator and set, still covered, in a warm, draft-free spot for about an hour so it comes to room temperature and rises.
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Remove the doughs from the bowls and shape each one into a ball. Press each ball down to flatten it slightly. Place the vanilla round on top of the chocolate round and stretch it so that it completely envelops the chocolate round, turning the dough over to stretch it over the bottom. Make a hole in the center of the dough by pushing your fist through it, then gently stretch the dough out to make a 9-x-13-inch oval.
  • Place the dough on the baking sheet. Insert a couple of plastic Baby Jesus figurines into the dough, if using. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and let rise for an hour or so, until the dough has puffed.
  • Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350℉ degrees, with a rack in the middle.

To make the topping:

  • Combine the flour, confectioners’ sugar, butter or shortening, and vanilla in a medium bowl and mix together into a smooth paste with your hands. Divide the paste in half. Add the cocoa powder to one half and knead and mix well until evenly incorporated. Divide each of the pastes into about 6 portions and shape into balls.
  • Gently brush the bread with the egg wash. Roll each paste ball into a log and then press to flatten it into a strip about 7 inches long, 1 inch wide, and 1⁄8 to 1⁄4 inch thick. Arrange them on the bread, alternating chocolate and vanilla strip, at approximately 2-inch intervals.
  • Bake for about 45 minutes, or until the bread is golden brown and makes a hollow sound when tapped on the bottom. Cool on a rack before slicing.

Notes

Rosca de Reyes de Chocolate y Vainilla

Frozen Tequila Piña Colada

Frozen Tequila Pina Colada
Print Recipe
4.8 from 5 votes

Frozen Tequila Piña Colada

My take on a Piña Colada. Being Mexican, I opted for Reposado tequila over rum and since I like it super smooth and creamy, I use coconut gelato.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: lime, pineapple, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 2-ounce scoops coconut gelato or sorbet
  • ½ cup frozen pineapple
  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 1 ounce pineapple juice
  • 1 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • ½ cup ice
  • 2 to 3 pieces candied pineapple on a skewer to garnish, optional
  • Flaky sea salt optional

Instructions

  • Put the gelato, frozen pineapple, tequila, pineapple juice, and lime juice in the blender and puree until smooth. Add the ½ cup of ice and pulse until desired consistency. Pour into a chilled glass. Garnish with candied pineapple on a skewer and a sprinkle with the sea salt, if desired.

Notes

Piña Colada con Tequila

Tequila Sunrise Spritz

Tequila Sunrise Spritz
Print Recipe
4.75 from 4 votes

Tequila Sunrise Spritz

A fizzy twist on the world-famous Tequila Sunrise, which I call a Tequila Sunrise Spritz because it’s topped off with sparkling white wine.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: lime, orange juice, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 3 ounces fresh squeezed orange juice
  • 1/2 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 ounce Aperol
  • 2 ounces Prosecco or any white sparkling wine
  • Splash seltzer water

Instructions

  • In a mixing glass, add the tequila, orange juice, and lime juice and stir to combine. Add ice to a tall chilled glass, such as a highball glass, and pour in the Aperol. Follow with the tequila mixture, and top with the Prosecco and a splash of seltzer.

Lime Paleta Charro Negro

Charro Negro with Lime Paleta
Print Recipe
2.75 from 4 votes

Lime Paleta Charro Negro

The name Charro Negro references the beautiful black suits that the Mexican horsemen or “charros” wear, and it’s made with Mexican cola, fresh lime juice, and tequila. I garnish it with a lime paleta that you can bite into at the end.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: lime, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Plata Tequila
  • 1/2 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • Mexican Cola to top
  • Lime paleta for garnish

Instructions

  • Add tequila and lime juice to a glass, stir, and top with Mexican Cola. Insert the lime paleta and serve. Eat the paleta as you sip the drink!

Notes

Charro Negro con Paleta de Limón

Tangerine Chile Gran Paloma

Tangerine Chile Gran Paloma
Print Recipe
3.4 from 5 votes

Tangerine Chile Gran Paloma

The Paloma is one of Mexico’s favorite ways to drink tequila, and I put my own spin on it using tangerine and a chile de árbol infused agave syrup.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: agave syrup, chile de arbol, tangerine, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the chile de árbol agave syrup:

  • 6 chiles de árbol
  • 1 cup agave nectar
  • ¾ cup water

For the paloma:

  • Lime slice to rim the glass
  • Salt to rim the glass
  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila
  • 1 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 2 ounces fresh squeezed tangerine juice
  • Seltzer water to top
  • Tangerine slice for garnish

Instructions

To make the chile de árbol agave syrup:

  • Add the chile de árbol, agave, and water to a small saucepan and set over medium heat, bring to a simmer. Lower heat to medium and let simmer for 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool to room temperature (do not refrigerate, the mixture will seize) and strain.

To make the paloma:

  • Rim a chilled glass with lime and salt. Add the tequila, lime juice, tangerine juice, and 1 ounce of the chile de árbol agave syrup to a shaker, add ice, and shake. Strain into the rimmed glass with ice. Top with a splash of seltzer water and garnish with a tangerine slice.

Notes

Gran Paloma de Mandarina con Chile

Honey Ginger Margarita

Honey Ginger Margarita
Print Recipe
4.34 from 6 votes

Honey Ginger Margarita

A twist on the margarita with a delicious honey ginger syrup.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ginger, honey, lime, orange, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the honey ginger syrup:

  • 1 cup honey
  • ¼ cup fresh ginger peeled and sliced
  • ½ cup water

For the margarita:

  • Salt to rim the glass
  • Crushed ice to put in the glass
  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 1 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 ounce orange liqueur
  • 1 cup crushed ice
  • Lime wedge for garnish

Instructions

To make the honey ginger syrup:

  • Add the honey, ginger, and water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Lower heat to medium low and simmer for 3-5 minutes. Let cool to room temperature and strain before using.

To make the margarita:

  • Rim a glass by dipping it into honey ginger syrup and then into salt. Add crushed ice to the glass.
  • In a shaker add the tequila, lime juice, orange liqueur, and 1 ounce of the honey ginger syrup. Shake until well mixed. Pour into the rimmed glass with ice. Garnish with a lime wedge and serve.

Notes

Margarita de Miel con Jengibre

Martha Stewart: Chef Pati Jinich Celebrates the Scope of Mexican Cuisine in Her New Cookbook

There may be no better time to be cooking Mexican food than right now. For one, some of the cuisine’s once hard-to-source ingredients are more widely available than ever. Second, it taps into many of our current vegetable-forward mindsets, offering recipes with depth and unique flavor that just so happen to be meatless. And third, Pati Jinich’s new book, Treasures of the Mexican Table, has just hit shelves—and it’s indeed a treasure.

Read more

Mexico News Daily: TV chef Pati Jinich’s special explores border cities’ unique melded cuisines

Acclaimed chef Pati Jinich remembers the distinctive menudo she tried on both sides of the Mexico-United States border, in Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, and El Paso, Texas. In both cities, it is eaten with hominy and served with bread — not with corn tortillas, as is the case elsewhere in Mexico.

Read more

The New York Times: What’s on TV This Week

Friday – La Frontera with Pati Jinich 9 p.m. on PBS (check local listings). The chef and TV host Pati Jinich has long presented food as a tool of diplomacy. “In my kitchen, the border experience is an inspiration,” she said in a 2018 episode of her PBS series “Pati’s Mexican Table.” Her new travel series, “La Frontera,” expands on that notion; it focuses on food in border towns in Mexico and the southern United States, including El Paso and Juarez.

Read more

Univision Al Punto: Chef mexicana habla de su respeto por la comida Tex-Mex

La afamada chef mexicana Pati Jinich presenta una nueva serie titulada ‘La Frontera con Pati Jinich’, en la que recorre cada punto de la frontera entre Texas y México, mientas que comparte platos tipicos con lugareños y reflexiona sobre la fusión de culturas.

Ver clip

WTTW: “Doubly Blessed”: Pati Jinich Explores the Intermingling of Cultures at the U.S.-Mexico Border

“Tex-Mex food gets a bad rap. ‘When you are part of two things, you’re seen as lesser, unfortunately. You’re seen as less pure of this, less pure of that—instead of thinking, ‘Whoa, this is a doubly rich world,’ where you have more freedom to play with techniques and ingredients from both sides, and you’re creating some new thing.’

That’s what Pati Jinich believes, at least, and the same line of thinking applies to the area from which Tex-Mex hails: the United States-Mexico border, which is the subject of Jinich’s new two-part PBS special La Frontera with Pati Jinich, premiering October 15 and 22.

Read more

Carne en su Jugo

carne en su jugo
Print Recipe
5 from 6 votes

Carne en su Jugo

Carne en su Jugo recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 4 “Los Mariachis”
Cook Time40 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: bacon, beef, corn tortillas, guacamole, serrano chiles, tomatillos
Servings: 4 to 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 pound tomatillos husked and rinsed
  • 1 to 2 fresh serrano chiles stemmed
  • 1 cup cilantro leaves and upper part of stems
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt or to taste
  • 1 pound thick bacon slices chopped
  • 2 pounds sirloin steak thinly sliced and cut into small bite size pieces
  • 1 cup finely chopped onion
  • 2 to 3 cups chicken or beef broth
  • 5 to 6 cups Frijoles de Olla or beans from the pot (cooked pinto beans)

To serve:

  • Finely chopped white onion
  • Finely chopped cilantro
  • Quartered limes
  • Warm corn tortillas optional
  • Fresh chunky guacamole optional

Instructions

  • Place tomatillos and serrano chiles in a medium saucepan. Cover with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, then reduce heat to medium and cook for 8 to 10 minutes until completely cooked through and soft. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the tomatillos and chiles to the jar of a blender along with the cilantro and a teaspoon of salt. Puree until completely smooth and set aside.
  • In a large casserole or Dutch oven, fry the chopped bacon over medium heat until crisp. Transfer to a bowl with a slotted spoon and set aside. Reduce heat to medium, add the streak to bacon fat and cook until it starts to render all its juices. Once it does, add the onion and the broth. Continue cooking for about 15 minutes.
  • Incorporate the tomatillo puree and continue cooking for another 15 minutes, until meat is completely tender and broth has seasoned.
  • Serve the carne en su jugo in bowls along with a ladle of cooked pinto beans, and top with the crisp bacon. Place chopped white onion, cilantro, and lime wedges on the table for everyone to add as they please. You can serve with warm corn tortillas and a side of fresh guacamole.

Notes

Meat, Pinto Bean and Bacon Stew