Tacos, Tostadas & Sopes

Beachside Snapper

Beachside Snapper
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3.75 from 4 votes

Beachside Snapper

Beachside Snapper recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 8 "Super Sonoran"
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: anaheim chiles, Beach, corn tortillas, fish, lime, mexican crema, Mexico, pati’s mexican table, Pescado, red snapper, snapper, Sonora, Sonoran, tacos, whole fish, Worcestershire sauce, Zarandeado
Servings: 4 to 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 1/2 to 5 pounds whole red snapper split in half and deboned, with the skin left on
  • 1 ripe tomato
  • 1/2 white onion peeled and quartered
  • 6 garlic cloves unpeeled
  • 2 fresh Anaheim chiles
  • 1/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons Mexican crema
  • 3 tablespoons yellow mustard
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter softened
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • Vegetable oil for brushing the aluminum foil
  • 1 red bell pepper stemmed, seeded and cut in 2-inch matchsticks
  • 1 yellow bell pepper stemmed, seeded and cut in 2-inch matchsticks
  • 1 green bell pepper stemmed, seeded and cut in 2-inch matchsticks
  • 1/2 red onion peeled, slivered

To serve:

  • 10 to 12 corn tortillas homemade or store bought
  • 2 or 3 limes quartered
  • Your favorite hot sauce

Instructions

  • Preheat the broiler. Cover a baking sheet with foil. Place the tomato, white onion, garlic and Anaheim chiles on the baking sheet and roast under the broiler for about 10 minutes, turning the vegetables halfway through, until charred and the tomatoes have begun to release their juices. The garlic will probably be done before the other vegetables. Remove them from the heat when charred. Alternatively, you can char everything on a preheated comal, skillet or griddle set over medium-low heat, or on a grill. Remove from the heat.
  • Transfer the Anaheim chiles to a bowl and cover tightly or to a plastic bag, and seal. Allow to sweat for 10 minutes, then peel, stem and seed. Peel the garlic when it’s cool enough to handle.
  • Place the roasted vegetables, including any juices from the baking sheet or bowl, in a blender. Add the lime juice, mayonnaise, crema, mustard, Worcestershire sauce, soy sauce, butter, salt and pepper. Puree until completely smooth.
  • Position the rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 450°F. Cover a large baking sheet with aluminum foil. Brush the foil with vegetable oil.
  • Rinse the fish fillets, pat dry, and place skin side down on the baking sheet. Reserve 1/2 cup of the sauce and spread the rest very generously over the fish, creating a very thick layer.
  • Bake the fish anywhere from 20 to 30 minutes –- depending on the thickness of the fish, until the fish is cooked through and flakes easily when poked with a fork, and the sauce is nicely browned and a little crusty on top.
  • Meanwhile, preheat a comal over medium heat, and in a medium bowl combine the bell peppers, slivered red onion and reserved sauce. Toss well.
  • Heat the corn tortillas on the hot comal for about a minute per side, or until they are heated through and beginning to speckle and very lightly toast on both sides. Place in a tortilla warmer or wrap in a clean kitchen towel.
  • Place the bell pepper/sauce mix and the tortillas on the table along with the quartered limes and your favorite hot sauce.
  • Bring the fish to the table as soon as it is ready. Let everyone assemble their tacos with a piece of fish, the peppers and sauce, a squeeze of lime and hot sauce to taste.

Notes

Pescado Zarandeado

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos
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5 from 5 votes

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 7 "Legends of the Sonoran Sea"
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, cheese, Chiles, corn tortillas, Mexico, Oaxaca cheese, pati’s mexican table, Shrimp, Sonora, Sonoran, tacos
Servings: 6 to 8 double tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ripe tomatoes
  • 4 garlic cloves peeled
  • 2 to 3 chiles de árbol stemmed, keep the seeds (more to taste)
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste, plus more for seasoning the shrimp
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil divided, plus more to cook the tacos
  • 2 pounds medium shrimp rinsed, shelled, and butterflied
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter divided
  • 12 to 16 corn tortillas
  • 3 cups melty shredded cheese such as mozzarella, asadero, Oaxaca, quesadilla, or Monterey Jack
  • 1 large ripe avocado halved, pitted, thinly sliced

Instructions

  • Combine the tomatoes, garlic and chiles de árbol in a medium saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and cook for about 10 minutes, until the tomatoes and garlic are completely soft and the chiles are plump and rehydrated. Transfer to a blender with 1 cup of the cooking liquid. Add the oregano, tomato paste and salt, and puree until completely smooth.
  • Heat the 1 tablespoon of the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Once hot, pour in the tomato puree, cover partially and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 6 minutes, until the mixture has thickened and darkened, and the flavors have intensified. Turn off the heat.
  • Season the butterflied shrimp with salt and pepper. Melt 1 tablespoon butter with 1 tablespoon oil in a large sauté pan over high heat. Once the butter begins to foam, add half the shrimp and quickly sear for a minute or so per side. They should be browned and just cooked through. Be careful not to overcook or the shrimp will be rubbery. Scrape into a bowl. Melt another tablespoon butter and oil together and repeat with the second batch.
  • Heat a comal, griddle or large skillet, preferably nonstick or cast iron, over medium heat. Add a tablespoon or two of oil to the surface.
  • One by one, lightly sauce the tortillas: briefly dip them into the tomato sauce, making sure the entire tortilla is coated (I like to use a pair of rubber tipped tongs but you could also just use you hands) and lay as many as will fit on the comal or griddle without overlapping. Top each tortilla with 2 to 3 tablespoons shredded cheese. Leave for a couple of minutes, until the cheese begins to melt and the bottoms of the sauced tortillas begin to dry and brown a little. Then, using a spatula, stack two sauced, browned and cheese-topped tortillas, one on top of another.
  • Don’t worry if the tortilla that you scrape up to stack on top of the other one sticks and tears a little bit or if it is not sitting evenly on top. Spoon some seared shrimp on top of each stack, gently fold with a spatula and continue cooking for a couple of minutes, until the cheese has completely melted and begun to ooze out and create a crust.
  • Remove from the heat and serve hot. Top with slices of ripe avocado.

Notes

Tacos Bravos de Toño

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada
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4.41 from 5 votes

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 7 "Legends of the Sonoran Sea"
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Cachoreada, chiltepín chiles, mayonnaise, Mexico, pati’s mexican table, Salsa, Scallops, Shrimp, Sonora, Sonoran, tostadas
Servings: 6 to 8 big tostadas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the mayonnaise:

  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • Pinch of kosher or sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

For the tostadas:

Instructions

To make the mayonnaise:

  • In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise with the lime zest. Season with salt and black pepper. Mix well and set aside.

To make the tostadas:

  • Have the three salsas prepared and ready to use, and the tostadas within reach.
  • Season the shrimp and scallops with the salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon oil in a very large skillet over high heat. Once the butter has begun to foam, add the shrimp. Cook for 1 or 2 minutes per side, just until nicely seared and browned on the outside but not overcooked inside. Scrape into a bowl. Return the skillet to the heat, add the remaining butter and oil, and once the butter foams, add the scallops. Cook for a minute per side, until the tops and bottoms are browned and the middles are no longer translucent, and remove from the heat. The scallops should be medium rare. As soon as you can handle them, slice thin and set aside.
  • Spread about a tablespoon of the mayonnaise on each tostada, top with a layer of sliced scallops, a couple of tablespoons of the salsa bandera, and then a layer of the shrimp. Crown with avocado slices. Top the avocado slices with a couple of tablespoons of salsa negra and add apple chiltepin salsita or another hot sauce to taste. Serve immediately, passing more salsa negra around the table for people to add as desired.

Notes

Cachoreada

Birria

Birria
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4.75 from 8 votes

Birria

Birria recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 11 “A Day in Sinaloa's Countryside”
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Total Time4 hrs 30 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: avocado leaves, birria, cilantro, corn tortillas, goat, guajillo chiles, lamb, lime, onion, tacos
Servings: 8 to 10 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the Birria:

  • 4 to 5 pounds goat meat bone-in, cut into about 3-inch pieces (you may substitute lamb)
  • 1/4 cup white distilled vinegar
  • 6 teaspoons kosher or sea salt divided
  • 3 quarts water plus more to soak the meat
  • 4 to 5 large dried avocado leaves
  • 3 ounces (about 10) guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded

For serving:

  • Warm corn tortillas
  • 2 cups finely chopped white onion
  • 2 cups chopped cilantro leaves
  • 2 to 3 limes quartered

Instructions

  • Place the meat in a large bowl and cover with cool water. Add the vinegar and 2 teaspoons salt and let sit for 20 to 30 minutes. Rinse well with cold water.
  • Place the rinsed meat in a large casserole, cover with at least 3 quarts water, add 4 teaspoons salt, and stir. Set over high heat and let it come to a rolling boil, reduce the heat to low, remove whatever foam may have come to the surface, cover, and cook for 2 hours.
  • Set a comal or small saute pan over medium-low heat. Once hot, toast the avocado leaves, flipping as they cook, for about a minute until fragrant.
  • Place the chiles in a small saucepan, cover with water, and set over medium-high heat. Simmer for 10 minutes, until the chiles are completely rehydrated and plumped up. Place the chiles in the jar of a blender, along with a cup of the cooking liquid, and puree until completely smooth.
  • Uncover the meat, add the guajillo chile puree, stir, and drop in the toasted avocado leaves. Cover again and continue cooking for another 2 hours, or until the meat is succulent, juicy, tender, and falling apart when a fork is inserted.
  • Serve the meat in bowls along with the broth. At the table, have warm corn tortillas, chopped white onion, chopped cilantro, and quartered limes for people to assemble their birria tacos and to season the broth. You can also chase the tacos with the broth.

Notes

Goat Meat Stew and Tacos

Campechano Tacos with Street Style Salsa

Campechano Tacos with Street Style Salsa
Print Recipe
4.29 from 7 votes

Campechano Tacos with Street Style Salsa

Campechano Tacos with Street Style Salsa recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 4 “Los Mochis, Street Taco Favorites”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time1 hr 45 mins
Total Time1 hr 55 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chicharrón, cilantro, corn tortillas, flank steak, garlic, longaniza, onion, pati’s mexican table, Salsa Callejera, tacos
Servings: 8 tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds flank steak cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 white onion
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1/2 pound longaniza casings removed, chopped (or substitute Mexican chorizo)
  • 1/2 pound pork chicharrón crumbled or chopped into small pieces
  • 8 corn tortillas store-bought or homemade
  • 1 cup finely chopped white onion for garnish
  • 1 cup chopped cilantro leaves for garnish
  • Salsa Callejera

Instructions

  • Place the meat, garlic, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, and a teaspoon of salt in a large casserole or pot. Cover generously with water and place over high heat. Once it comes to a simmer, reduce heat to medium low, remove any foam that may have risen to the top, cover, and cook for an hour and a half until the meat is completely tender and falling apart. Turn off heat and set aside.
  • Once cool enough to handle, remove the meat with a slotted spoon and chop into small pieces. Set aside.
  • Set a large saute pan over medium-high heat, once hot add a tablespoon of oil. Add the longaniza or chorizo and brown, crumbling into smaller pieces with a couple wooden spoons or spatulas as it cooks, for about 5 minutes until crisp and brown. Add the chopped meat, stir, and cook for a couple minutes until it starts to brown as well. Incorporate the chicharrón, mix it all up and turn off the heat.
  • Preheat a comal or skillet over medium-low heat. Heat the tortillas for about a minute per side until completely hot with brown specks on both sides. Assemble the tacos, or let people assemble their own, by adding some of the meat mix and topping with chopped onion, cilantro, and salsa callejera.

Notes

Tacos Campechanos de Suadero, Longaniza y Chicharrón con Salsa Callejera

Governor Shrimp Tacos

Governor Shrimp Tacos
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4.8 from 5 votes

Governor Shrimp Tacos

Governor Shrimp Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 1 "Tijuana’s Culinary Revolution" 
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Mexican, pati's mexican table, Shrimp, Sinaloa, Taco
Servings: 6 Tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 white onion slivered
  • 2 poblano chiles stemmed, seeded, slivered
  • 5 garlic cloves finely chopped
  • 2 ripe Roma tomatoes cored, seeded, slivered
  • 3 tablespoons sauce from chipotles in adobo
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
  • 1 1/2 pounds (about 11-15) shelled large shrimp cut into large chunks
  • 3 cups shredded Oaxaca, mozzarella, asadero or Muenster cheese
  • 6 to 8 flour or corn tortillas
  • Sliced avocado for garnish
  • 1 Chile Manzano sliced and mixed with the juice of a lime, 1/4 red onion and salt to taste

Instructions

  • Heat the butter in a large nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat. Once it melts and begins to bubble, add the onion and poblano and cook until wilted, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, stir, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Incorporate the tomatoes, cook for a minute, and as they begin to soften, add the sauce from the chipotles in adobo, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Stir well, cook for another minute, then add the shrimp and cook just until they change color, about 1 to 2 minutes. Turn off heat and scrape into a bowl to prevent the shrimp from overcooking.
  • On a preheated comal set over low heat, heat the tortillas on both sides for a minute. Add about 1/2 cup of shredded cheese onto each one. Once the cheese begins to melt, add a generous amount of the shrimp mixture, fold in half and continue heating until cheese has completely melted and the tortillas have begun to lightly brown and create a crust.
  • Serve with sliced avocado and Manzano chiles and onion.

Video

Notes

Tacos Gobernador de Camarón

Brown Sugar Carnitas

brown sugar carnitas
Print Recipe
4.41 from 10 votes

Brown Sugar Carnitas

Brown Sugar Carnitas from Pati's Mexican Table, Season 7, Episode 2 "Tijuana: Stories from the Border"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Total Time1 hr 35 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: brown sugar, Carnitas, pati's mexican table, pork
Servings: 8 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup lard, vegetable shortening or oil
  • 3 to 4 pounds boneless pork shoulder or butt fat on, cut into 3” chunks
  • 4 teaspoons kosher or sea salt divided
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups milk divided
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 1/4 white onion coarsely chopped
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar

Instructions

  • Heat the lard in a large Dutch oven or heavy casserole over medium-high heat. Season the meat with 2 teaspoons of the salt and the black pepper. Once the lard has melted, add the meat, brown on all sides, stirring and flipping as it does, for about 10 to 12 minutes.
  • In the jar of a blender, pour 1 ½ cups of the milk and add the garlic, onion and remaining 2 teaspoons of salt. Puree until smooth. Pour over the meat and let it come to a simmer, then reduce heat to medium-low, drop in the bay leaves, and cover. Cook covered for 1 hour and 15 minutes, flipping the chunks of meat a couple times in between.
  • In a small bowl, combine the remaining ½ cup milk with the sugar. Pour over the carnitas, stir, and let them continue to cook, uncovered, for another 4 to 5 minutes. Turn off the heat.
  • With a slotted spoon, remove the meat and place in a bowl. Shred with a couple forks, add a couple tablespoons of the seasoned fat remaining in the casserole and toss.

Notes

Carnitas Caramelizadas

Cali-Baja Fish Tacos

Cali-Baja Fish Tacos
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4.58 from 7 votes

Cali-Baja Fish Tacos

Cali-Baja Fish Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 3 "Ensenada's Epic Seafood"
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Baja, California, Cod, fish, Mexican, Taco, Tilapia
Servings: 6 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 egg whites
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour plus extra flour for dusting the fish
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt or sea salt or to taste, plus more to season the fish
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 cup Mexican beer preferably a light beer (but anything short of a very dark bitter beer will work)
  • Safflower or canola oil for frying
  • 1 pound mild firm white fish such as cod, haddock, or halibut, cut into 1x4-inch strips
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

  • In the bowl of a standing mixer, set with the paddle attachment, beat the egg whites at medium speed until stiff, but not dry, peaks form. Remove the bowl from the mixer.
  • In another bowl, combine the all-purpose flour with the salt and cumin and whisk in the Mexican beer. In 4 additions, gently fold the flour mixture into the egg whites, taking care not to deflate the egg whites.
  • Pour the oil into a heavy, wide skillet or casserole to a depth of ¼” and heat over medium heat for at least 5 minutes. Test the heat by dipping a wooden spoon or the tip of a piece of fish into the oil: it should bubble happily around whatever you introduce into it. Set a cooling rack on a baking sheet and cover the rack with paper towels. If you don’t have a cooling rack, just cover the baking sheet with paper towels.
  • While the oil is heating, you can season and flour the fish strips. Season them lightly with salt and pepper. Place flour on a plate, and gently press each fish strip into the flour, flip over and flour the other side. Tap off excess flour and place on the rack.
  • When the oil is hot, one by one, dip the floured fish strips into the batter and immediately, but gently, place into the hot oil. Add as many as you can without crowding the pan. Fry until crisp and lightly golden brown, which should take 2 to 3 minutes; then flip and fry on the other side, for another 2 to 3 minutes or until crisp and lightly golden.
  • Remove with tongs - the type with the heat-proof coating on the ends are best, if you want to avoid tearing the batter - or a slotted spoon and place on the paper towel-covered rack. Cover loosely with foil to keep warm. Serve on a flour tortilla with salsa macha and creamy slaw. Optional, pickled red onion and a jalapeño marinated in fresh squeezed lime juice and salt to taste.

Notes

Tacos de Pescado Cali-Baja

Story Goes… Governor Shrimp Tacos

The story goes, governor shrimp tacos, or tacos gobernador de camarón, were created in the state of Sinaloa in the early 1990s to surprise governor Francisco Labastida Ochoa, after he told a few friends how much he loved his wife’s shrimp tacos. That bit of information was passed on to the owners of Los Arcos in Mazatlán restaurant, before he headed there to visit.

The chef was given the quest not only try to match the governor’s wife’s tacos, which no one besides the governor had tried, but to beat them. So quite a few taco recipes were developed and tested. When the governor showed up to eat, he liked them so much he named them “tacos gobernador.”

Now, I do not know if that story is entirely true. But, what I do know is, these tacos became so popular you no longer only find them at Los Arcos in Mazatlán. They are all over Sinaloa and beyond. I had them as far away as Los Angeles and Miami.  Yet, I saw the most renditions on the 800 mile drive throughout the entire Baja Peninsula.

I felt more than obliged to offer my take on tacos gobernador, since my travels in Baja are featured on “Pati’s Mexican Table” in my new season premiering in a few weeks (you can watch the trailer here). And I am thrilled to share my recipe with you, as we all love these tacos in my home!

So what’s in tacos gobernador? First, a combination of shrimp and cheese makes them a cross between a taco and a quesadilla. A ton of cheese is really essential.

Second, cooked onion that is often accompanied by other vegetables, typically bell peppers and sometimes poblano chiles. If you ask me what I prefer, hands down, not even a second of hesitation, poblano chiles. I absolutely adore them. I feel lukewarm about green bell peppers to put it mildly. So my take has a combination of slivered onions and poblanos with just a bit of tomato.

Third, the seasonings. Some renditions have no sauce, only salt and pepper. Some have a simple to a more seasoned tomato sauce. I go for a seasoned, very thick sauce that is almost a paste, really. It combines tomato paste, La Costeña chipotles in adobo and the W sauce — Worcestershire — or as we call it in Mexico “salsa inglesa.”

Lastly, you can opt for corn or flour tortillas. There are no strict guidelines here, different from other kinds of tacos.

There are so many reasons why I like these tacos so much. They end up being a complete meal, they are so easy to prepare, they are irresistibly delicious and messy, the cheese creates an inviting crust as it melts… and they have a great story behind them. I do love a good story.

Governor Shrimp Tacos
Print Recipe
4.8 from 5 votes

Governor Shrimp Tacos

Governor Shrimp Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 1 "Tijuana’s Culinary Revolution" 
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Mexican, pati’s mexican table, Shrimp, Sinaloa, Taco
Servings: 6 Tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 white onion slivered
  • 2 poblano chiles stemmed, seeded, slivered
  • 5 garlic cloves finely chopped
  • 2 ripe Roma tomatoes cored, seeded, slivered
  • 3 tablespoons sauce from chipotles in adobo
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
  • 1 1/2 pounds (about 11-15) shelled large shrimp cut into large chunks
  • 3 cups shredded Oaxaca, mozzarella, asadero or Muenster cheese
  • 6 to 8 flour or corn tortillas
  • Sliced avocado for garnish
  • 1 Chile Manzano sliced and mixed with the juice of a lime, 1/4 red onion and salt to taste

Instructions

  • Heat the butter in a large nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat. Once it melts and begins to bubble, add the onion and poblano and cook until wilted, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, stir, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Incorporate the tomatoes, cook for a minute, and as they begin to soften, add the sauce from the chipotles in adobo, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Stir well, cook for another minute, then add the shrimp and cook just until they change color, about 1 to 2 minutes. Turn off heat and scrape into a bowl to prevent the shrimp from overcooking.
  • On a preheated comal set over low heat, heat the tortillas on both sides for a minute. Add about 1/2 cup of shredded cheese onto each one. Once the cheese begins to melt, add a generous amount of the shrimp mixture, fold in half and continue heating until cheese has completely melted and the tortillas have begun to lightly brown and create a crust.
  • Serve with sliced avocado and Manzano chiles and onion.

Video

Notes

Tacos Gobernador de Camarón

Sopes

The very first class I taught at the Mexican Cultural Institute, after I switched from being a policy analyst at the Inter American Dialogue, was October 18, 2007.

I remember the date exactly, because it was a day after Sami’s 6th birthday. For months, I had been teaching him and his two brothers, Alan who was then 8 and Juju who was just 1, how to make sopes every night for at least 3 months.

I had been so nervous about teaching in front of a live audience that, instead of telling them our usual bed time story about an imaginary and mischievous monkey called Waba-Waba, I had switched to a nightly cooking demo. They were as loving and kind and patient as they are with me to this day, did not complain, and pretended to be making sopes along with me.

I started the classes at the Institute in an attempt to share my love for Mexican cuisine and culture and to try to open a much wider window into its richness, diversity and surprising accessibility. I wanted to help break misconceptions about our food and our people and invite people north of the border to make use of our ingredients, techniques and recipes to enrich their own kitchens.

The very first dish that I shared was sopes. I even found a photo of that day… and you can see Rosa and I showing how to make sopes many ways, with our hands, using a rolling pin, with a tortilla press…

Pati and Rosa making sopes at the Mexican Cultural Institute

Why did I choose sopes? To begin with, because they are one of my favorite things to eat! But also, because sopes helped me shine a light on so many crucial elements of Mexican cuisine…

Sopes are part of a category of dishes we Mexicans call antojos, or antojitos, which translates to little cravings. An antojo is something you can eat anytime of day and can either be a quick bite or make a full meal, depending on what you top them with… and how many you eat.

Sopes are made of corn masa, which is a cornerstone of Mexican cuisine that has existed for thousands of years. Made of nixtamalized corn, corn masa renders corn nutritious and versatile. You don’t need to nixtamalize corn yourself, you can buy masa harina, which simply mixed with water makes masa!

Sopes show how playful and versatile masa can be. They are similar to a tortilla, but they are much thicker, and the rim around it that helps contain its garnishes. They are like little edible plates.

Sopes are easy to make. Different from a corn tortilla, someone who is making sopes for the first time, doesn’t need to worry about knowing how to use a tortilla press, the correct thickness, or the technique for making them puff up. They are much more forgiving.

Sopes are also accessible: you can make them ahead of time, vary the toppings, assemble in a few minutes, dress them up or dress them down. I always, always, add a layer of refried beans, a tasty salsa and either tangy, salty and crumbly queso cotija or queso fresco, crumbled on top.

To boot, sopes are super fun to make by yourself or with friends or with your kids.

So as you can see, sopes helped me achieve many things: they helped me show how accessible, forgiving, fun, filling, nutritious, versatile, rich and delicious Mexican food is.

You can follow along with this video too…

[embedyt] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Zlm3lsNPF4[/embedyt]

To this day, I am still proudly teaching at the Institute where I am the resident chef 11 years after I started. I am also serving sopes any chance I get.

Pati Jinich sopes
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Sopes

Sopes recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 10 "How I Got to Now"
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time8 mins
Total Time18 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cotija, queso fresco, refried beans, sopes, Tomatillo Salsita
Servings: 12 sopes
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

To make the Sopes:

  • 2 cups masa harina or corn tortilla flour such as Maseca
  • 2 cups water more if needed
  • Pinch kosher or coarse sea salt

To serve:

Instructions

  • Heat a comal or skillet over medium heat until very hot.

To make the sopes:

  • Combine the masa harina, water and salt, kneading in a revolving motion with your hands. Knead for a couple of minutes, until dough is smooth and has no lumps. If it feels too dry, add a bit more water.
  • Divide the dough into 12 balls, each about 2-inches in diameter. Line the bottom of a tortilla press with circles cut from a thin plastic bag (like the ones from the produce section of your grocery store). One at a time, place a ball of dough onto the plastic lining the bottom of the tortilla press, and top with another layer of plastic. Press down to make a flat disk as thick as a pancake, about 1/4-inch thick (much thicker than a tortilla). You can also flatten and form them by hand. Repeat with all 12 balls.
  • As you make them, place each sope on the hot comal or skillet. Let them cook about one to two minutes on each side, until opaque and speckled, and they can be flipped without sticking.
  • Take them off the comal and place them on a chopping board. Using a kitchen towel to protect your fingers, make a rim around each sope by pressing and pinching with your fingers along the edges. Return them to the comal or skillet, and let them cook for one or two more minutes per side, until thoroughly cooked.
  • If eaten the same day, they may be kept wrapped in a clean kitchen towel. If not, wrap them in a kitchen towel or paper towel, and store inside a closed plastic bag in the refrigerator. They will keep for up to 3 days, afterwards they will turn too hard. Reheat on hot comal or skillet for a couple minutes before eating. They can also be frozen and kept for months.

To serve:

  • Once the sopes have been thoroughly cooked and warmed, place on a platter and add a generous tablespoon of refried beans, shredded lettuce, crumbled cheese, chopped onion and Quick Roasted Salsita. Salsa may be left on the side for people to add as much as they like.

Sopes

Pati Jinich sopes
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Sopes

Sopes recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 10 "How I Got to Now"
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time8 mins
Total Time18 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cotija, queso fresco, refried beans, sopes, Tomatillo Salsita
Servings: 12 sopes
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

To make the Sopes:

  • 2 cups masa harina or corn tortilla flour such as Maseca
  • 2 cups water more if needed
  • Pinch kosher or coarse sea salt

To serve:

Instructions

  • Heat a comal or skillet over medium heat until very hot.

To make the sopes:

  • Combine the masa harina, water and salt, kneading in a revolving motion with your hands. Knead for a couple of minutes, until dough is smooth and has no lumps. If it feels too dry, add a bit more water.
  • Divide the dough into 12 balls, each about 2-inches in diameter. Line the bottom of a tortilla press with circles cut from a thin plastic bag (like the ones from the produce section of your grocery store). One at a time, place a ball of dough onto the plastic lining the bottom of the tortilla press, and top with another layer of plastic. Press down to make a flat disk as thick as a pancake, about 1/4-inch thick (much thicker than a tortilla). You can also flatten and form them by hand. Repeat with all 12 balls.
  • As you make them, place each sope on the hot comal or skillet. Let them cook about one to two minutes on each side, until opaque and speckled, and they can be flipped without sticking.
  • Take them off the comal and place them on a chopping board. Using a kitchen towel to protect your fingers, make a rim around each sope by pressing and pinching with your fingers along the edges. Return them to the comal or skillet, and let them cook for one or two more minutes per side, until thoroughly cooked.
  • If eaten the same day, they may be kept wrapped in a clean kitchen towel. If not, wrap them in a kitchen towel or paper towel, and store inside a closed plastic bag in the refrigerator. They will keep for up to 3 days, afterwards they will turn too hard. Reheat on hot comal or skillet for a couple minutes before eating. They can also be frozen and kept for months.

To serve:

  • Once the sopes have been thoroughly cooked and warmed, place on a platter and add a generous tablespoon of refried beans, shredded lettuce, crumbled cheese, chopped onion and Quick Roasted Salsita. Salsa may be left on the side for people to add as much as they like.

Fried Egg Taco with Pine Nut Pipián

fried egg taco
Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Fried Egg Taco with Pine Nut Pipián

Fried Egg Taco with Pine Nut Pipián recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 5, Episode 13 “José Andrés Takes Over”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Chorizo, fried egg, pickled red onions, Pine Nut Pipián, radish, tacos
Servings: 4 tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Prepare the chorizo: With a knife cut the chorizo link on one side, allowing it to split open. Squeeze the meat from the casing. In a pot over medium heat, gently cook the chorizo for 4 to 5 minutes, until cooked through and lightly browned. Set aside.
  • Heat a non-stick pan over medium heat. Add a generous amount of olive oil. Once the pan is hot, gently crack open the egg into the middle of the oil, tilting the pan to allow the yolk to be centered. Cook on medium heat, using a slotted spoon to prevent egg from sticking to the pan. Cover if needed to allow the white to cook through, leaving the yolk runny, about 1 1/2 minutes. Using the slotted spoon, scoop egg out of the frying oil, dab on a towel to allow any excess oil to drain away, and place the fried egg on a plate. Repeat cooking process for each of the four eggs.
  • Cut off a 4-inch piece from the baguette. Slice off the crust and then slice the inner bread into 1/2-inch strips. Toast in a pan with oil.
  • Top each egg taco with slice of toasted bread, radish, cilantro, Pickled Red Onion Slices, Pine Nut Pipián, and chorizo. Serve immediately.

Notes

Recipe courtesy José Andrés

Tacos al Pastor

Pati Jinich Tacos al Pastor
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Tacos al Pastor

Tacos al Pastor recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 3 “Taco Night”
Prep Time3 hrs
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time3 hrs 15 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: achiote paste, cheese, cilantro, corn tortillas, lime, pati's mexican table, pineapple, pork, tacos
Servings: 12 to 14 tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds pork shoulder or butt sirloin cutlets or butterfly chops, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 3 cups achiote adobo marinade
  • Half of a pineapple peeled, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil divided
  • To taste kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 12 to 14 corn tortillas (or flour tortillas to make them “gringas” style)
  • Shredded queso asadero, Mexican Oaxaca or Chihuahua or mozzarella, Monterey Jack, or any melty cheese of your choice (optional, for making them “gringas” style)
  • 1 cup cilantro roughly chopped, to garnish
  • 1 cup white onion roughly chopped, to garnish
  • 2 limes cut into quarters, to garnish
  • Serve with a salsa of your choice

Instructions

  • Marinate the meat in the adobo marinade for at least 3 hours, or up to 48 hours, in the refrigerator. Reserve 3/4 cup of marinade to brush on the pineapple before grilling/cooking and to finish off meat.
  • When ready to make tacos, remove the meat from the refrigerator. Brush some of the reserved marinade on the pineapple slices. Reserve the remaining marinade.
  • Heat a large heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add a tablespoon of oil. Place as many pineapple slices as will fit on the skillet and sear for about 3 minutes per side, until juicy and lightly charred on both sides. Remove from heat. When cool enough to handle, cut the pineapple into thin slices about 1 to 2-inches long and 1/4-inch wide, removing the core. Place in a bowl and cover.
  • Drizzle another tablespoon of oil onto the skillet. Lightly sprinkle the meat with salt to taste. Sear as many slices of meat as will fit in the pan, without over crowding, for about 2 minutes per side until browned on both sides. Cook in batches if necessary. Place the meat on a chopping board. Cut it crosswise into thin slices about 1/4-inch thick and 1-inch wide.
  • Once done with all the meat, reduce the heat to medium, place the meat back in the skillet and pour the rest of the unused marinade on top. Stir and cook for another minute. Cover and set on the table.
  • On a pre-heated cast iron skillet or comal set over medium heat, heat the corn tortillas 1 to 2 minutes per side until thoroughly cooked, lightly browned and crisp on the outside. Place them in a tortilla warmer and bring to the table along with the meat, pineapple, chopped cilantro, chopped onion, lime wedges, and salsa of your choice. Let everyone assemble their own tacos.
  • Note: If you want to offer some “gringas,” heat flour tortillas on the comal and, once hot, add the melty cheese, fold, and let it melt as if it were a quesadilla. Once melted, re-open the tortilla, add a generous tablespoon or two of the sliced meat, fold again and serve.

Potato, Scallion & Chorizo Crispy Tacos

Print Recipe
4.13 from 8 votes

Potato, Scallion & Chorizo Crispy Tacos

Potato, Scallion & Chorizo Crispy Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 9 “Chorizo”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time25 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Chorizo, corn tortillas, pati's mexican table, potatoes, salsa verde, scallions, Taco
Servings: 5 to 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 lb red bliss potatoes peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 8 oz fresh uncooked Mexican chorizo sausage casings removed, coarsely chopped
  • 8 scallions white and light green parts thinly sliced (1/2 cup)
  • 1 tsp kosher or sea salt or more to taste
  • 10-12 Corn tortillas
  • safflower oil for frying
  • Salsa verde or any salsa of your choice

Instructions

  • Bring a medium pot of water to a boil over medium-high heat. Add the potato pieces, once the water returns to a boil, cook for 10 to 12 minutes or until the potatoes are tender. Drain.
  • Place the chorizo in a large skillet over medium-high heat. As it cooks, use a wooden spoon or spatula to crumble it into smaller pieces. Once it browns and crisps, 5 to 6 minutes, add the scallions and stir to combine; cook for about 1 minute or until the scallions begin to soften.
  • Add the cooked potatoes and salt, mashing them into the chorizo mixture with a potato masher or a wooden spoon, for about 1 minute until well combined. Remove from the heat. Taste, add salt as needed.
  • Heat a dry, medium skillet over medium heat. Warm the tortillas in the skillet one at a time for 15 to 30 seconds on each side, to soften them for rolling and so they will not crack as you assemble tacos.
  • Place a few tablespoons of the filling on the center of each heated tortilla, and roll, as tightly as you can, into a taco. Insert a wooden toothpick through taco pairs, through the seams to help them retain their roll shape as they cook. When they have all been rolled, finish the tacos by either frying or toasting them.

To fry the tacos:

  • Pour enough oil into a large skillet to a depth of about 1 inch, place over medium heat. Once the oil is hot, 4 to 6 minutes, fry the tacos in batches, placing them in the skillet, without crowding them. They oil should be bubbling as they cook. Cook for about 2 to 3 minutes on the first side, until the bottom and sides have crisped and turned golden. Use tongs to turn over the tacos, cook for another 2 to 3 minutes. Transfer them to a plate lined with paper towels. Continue until all the tacos have been fried.

To toast the tacos:

  • Heat a large, dry skillet or comal over medium heat. Working in batches, place the tacos in the skillet. Let them toast and heat for about 3 to 4 minutes or until the tacos are browned and crisped, then flip to the other side and toast until evenly browned and crisp.
  • Remove all toothpicks; serve warm.

Notes

Tacos Crujientes de Papa, Cebollita y Chorizo

Steak Tacos with Jamaica and Jalapeño Syrup

steak tacos with jamaica
Print Recipe
4 from 5 votes

Steak Tacos with Jamaica and Jalapeño Syrup

Steak Tacos with Jamaica and Jalapeño Syrup recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 6 “Hibiscus Flowers”
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time1 hr 45 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: corn tortillas, flowers, hibiscus, jalapeno, jamaica, pati's mexican table, queso fresco, serrano chiles, steak, tacos
Servings: 8 generous servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the Jamaica Concentrate (makes about 5 cups):

  • 8 cups water
  • 6 oz, about 2 cups, dried hibiscus flowers
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar or to taste
  • 2 tbsp fresh lime juice or to taste

For the tacos:

  • 1 lb flank steak
  • 2 cups jamaica/hibiscus flower concentrate
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 whole cloves
  • A pinch black pepper freshly ground
  • 3/4 tsp kosher salt or to taste
  • safflower or corn oil
  • Salt to taste
  • 1 serrano or jalapeño chile halved and seeded
  • 1 ripe Mexican avocado halved, pitted and sliced
  • 1/2 cup queso fresco crumbled
  • 16 corn tortillas

Instructions

To make the concentrate:

  • In a saucepan, pour 8 cups of water and place over high heat. Once it comes to a boil, add the jamaica flowers, simmer at medium heat for 10 minutes and turn off the heat. Let it cool down and strain into a heat proof glass or plastic water jar. Add the sugar and lime juice, mix well, cover and refrigerate.

To make the tacos:

  • Pour the jamaica concentrate, bay leaves, whole cloves, black pepper and salt into a medium saucepan set over medium-high heat. Bring to a boil and simmer for about 15 minutes, or until it reduces to half the original amount.
  • Let the marinade cool and pour over the flank steak in a baking dish or container. Cover and let it marinade anywhere from 1 to 24 hours.
  • Set grill pan, grill or saute pan over medium-high heat. Brush with a light coat of oil. Sprinkle meat with a bit more salt. Grill meat anywhere from 4 to 6 minutes per side, depending on how cooked you want it.
  • Meanwhile, pour the marinade into a saucepan set over medium heat and drop in the halved serrano or jalapeño chile. Let the sauce reduce for 15 minutes, or until it coats the back of a wooden spoon. The syrup will thicken considerably as it cools. Remove from heat and let cool.
  • When the meat is ready, slice it thin and if you want, cut it into chunks. Heat corn tortillas over a comal or skillet over medium heat, it will take about a minute per side. For each taco, add a couple tablespoons or slices of meat in the center of each tortillas, a slice of avocado, some crumbled queso fresco and drizzle some of the jamaica and syrup on top. Enjoy your tacos!

Notes

Tacos de Carne con Jarabe de Jamaica y Jalapeño

Cactus Paddle Tostada

cactus paddle tostada
Print Recipe
4.6 from 5 votes

Cactus Paddle Tostada

Cactus Paddle Tostada recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 13 “Naturally Vegetarian Mexican”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cactus, cilantro, jalapeno, nopales, onion, pati's mexican table, refried beans, Tomatoes, tostadas
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons safflower or corn oil
  • 3 pounds fresh nopales rinsed, cleaned and diced; or, if canned, rinsed thoroughly
  • 1/2 pound ripe tomato chopped
  • 3 tablespoons white onion chopped
  • 1 tablespoon cilantro chopped, optional
  • 1 jalapeño pepper chopped, seeding optional
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice
  • Salt to taste

For the tostadas:

Instructions

To clean fresh cactus paddles:

  • Rinse fresh cactus paddles under cold water, being careful not to prick your fingers with the small thorns on its surface. Using a vegetable peeler or small sharp knife, peel away the darker bumps where thorns grow, as well as the thorns, trying not to peel off all the outer dark green skin. Lay the paddles flat on a chopping board, then trim around approximately 1/4 inch of the edges and 1/2 inch of the thick base. Once cleaned, rinse and dice into 1/2-to-1-inch squares, to your liking.

To use cactus from a can, bag or jar:

  • After you have removed the diced cactus from the jar or can, rinse it under water and drain well.

To cook the cactus:

  • Heat two tablespoons of the oil in a thick, large-sized skillet (one that has a lid) over medium-high heat. Add the diced cactus, stir in the salt and stir for a minute or two. Place the lid on the skillet.
  • Reduce the heat to medium and let the cactus cook and sweat for about 20 minutes, until it has exuded a gelatinous liquid that will begin to dry out (NOTE: If using cactus from a can or jar, already cleaned and cooked, just cook for an additional five minutes).
  • Take the lid off the skillet, stir and make sure most of that gelatinous substance has dried up. If it hasn’t, let the cactus cook for a few more minutes until it does. Let the cactus cool slightly. In a mixing bowl, toss the cactus with the tomato, onion, jalapeño, cilantro, lime juice and salt. Like this, it can be eaten as a cactus paddle, nopal salad!

To assemble the tostadas:

  • Spread a layer of refried beans on each tostada. Spoon some the cooked cactus mixture on top, and add the garnishes of your choice. I add avocado slices, queso fresco, Mexican crema and salsa verde!

Notes

Tostadas de nopales

Adobo Fish Tacos with Grilled Pineapple Salsa

adobo fish tacos with grilled pineapple salsa
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Adobo Fish Tacos with Grilled Pineapple Salsa

Adobo Fish Tacos with Grilled Pineapple Salsa recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 12 “Tacos, Tacos, Tacos”
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time30 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ancho chiles, apple cider vinegar, cilantro, corn tortillas, fish, jalapeno, onion, pati's mexican table, pineapple, red snapper, rockfish, sea bass, serrano chiles, snook, tacos, Tilapia
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 oz or 3 ancho chiles rinsed, stemmed and seeded
  • 1/2 cup white onion coarsely-chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 pound of mild and firm fish fillets like snapper striped bass, rock fish, snook or tilapia
  • 4 pineapple slices
  • 1 jalapeño or serrano chile chopped, or to taste
  • 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • To taste kosher or coarse sea salt
  • corn tortillas

Instructions

To make the Adobo Sauce:

  • Cover the chiles with boiling hot water and let them soak for 10 minutes. Pace the chiles along with 1/2 cup of soaking liquid, onion, garlic, oregano, vinegar, sugar and salt in the blender. Purée until smooth.
  • In a saucepan set over medium heat, heat the oil. Once hot, pour the sauce into the oil; cover the saucepan, leaving it slightly open, and let the sauce season and thicken for 6 to 8 minutes, stirring here and there. Remove from the heat.

To make the Fish:

  • Baste the fish fillets with the adobo sauce; you may refrigerate them and let them marinate for up to 24 hours.
  • In a large skillet coated with oil and set over medium-high heat, cook the fish for about 3 to 4 minutes per side.

To make the Salsa:

  • Heat a grill pan, a grill or a nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot and lightly coat with safflower or corn oil. Cook the pineapple slices for about 4 minutes per side until they are slightly charred. Remove from the heat, once cool enough to handle cut into bite-size chunks. Place in a mixing bowl and toss with the cilantro, chile, lime juice, oil and salt to taste.

To assemble Tacos:

  • Place the warm tortillas, the pineapple salsa and the fish on the table, then assemble the tacos!

Notes

Tacos de pescado adobado con salsa de piña

Lime-Rubbed Chicken Tacos with Corn Guacamole

lime rubbed chicken tacos
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Lime-Rubbed Chicken Tacos with Corn Guacamole

Lime-Rubbed Chicken Tacos with Corn Guacamole recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 12 “Tacos, Tacos, Tacos”
Prep Time40 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time55 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, chicken, Corn, corn tortillas, guacamole, jalapeno, lime, pati's mexican table, tacos, Tomatoes
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the chicken:

  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless chicken breasts
  • 2 tablespoons fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh rosemary, or 1/4 teaspoon dried

For the corn guacamole:

  • 2 large ripe Mexican avocados halved, pitted and diced
  • 1 jalapeno chile roasted, chopped, or to taste
  • 2 garlic cloves roasted with the skin on, peeled and minced
  • 3/4 cup corn kernels shaved from corn, or cooked from thawed
  • 3/4 cup cherry or grape tomatoes halved or chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste

To assemble tacos:

Instructions

To make the chicken:

  • Mix the lime juice with the olive oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper and rosemary in a bowl. Pour on top of the chicken, in a container. Cover and refrigerate anywhere from 1/2 hour up to 12 hours.
  • Heat a medium-sized sauté or grill pan over medium-high heat. Add corn or safflower oil; once it is hot but not smoking, add the chicken. Sauté until golden brown and cooked through, about 5 minutes per side. Remove from the pan, place on chopping board to cool. When cool enough to handle, slice into diagonal strips about a 1/2-inch wide.

To make the guacamole:

  • Place the jalapeño and garlic cloves in a small baking dish under the broiler, for 6 to 9 minutes, until completely cooked through, soft and skin is charred. Once cool enough to handle, peel garlic and mince along with chiles.
  • Place diced avocado in a mixing bowl. Add the charred and minced garlic and jalapeños, gently tossing everything together well. Incorporate the corn and tomatoes. Squeeze the lime juice on top and sprinkle the salt. Mix it all together.

To assemble tacos:

  • In an already hot skillet or comal set over medium-low heat, heat the tortillas. It will take about 1 minute per side.
  • Place the tortillas in a tortilla warmer or wrap them in a clean kitchen towel or cloth napkin. Serve them together with the guacamole and the chicken at the table and assemble your tacos!

Notes

Tacos de pollo con guacamole con elote

Bricklayer-Style Beef Tacos

bricklayer tacos
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Bricklayer-Style Beef Tacos

Bricklayer-Style Beef Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 12 “Tacos, Tacos, Tacos”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: bacon, beef, corn tortillas, flour tortillas, jalapeno, onion, pati's mexican table, peppers, tacos, Tomatoes
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces bacon sliced
  • 2 pounds beef sirloin or tenderloin cut into 1″ pieces
  • To taste kosher or sea salt
  • To taste freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups white onion slivered or sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves chopped
  • 1 jalapeno chile sliced, seeding optional, or to taste
  • 1 pound ripe Roma tomatoes
  • Flour or corn tortillas

Instructions

  • Place tomatoes in a baking dish and under the broiler for 6 to 9 minutes, until charred, mushy and juices have begun to run. Once cool, roughly chop, but don’t discard the juices.
  • Heat the skillet, add the bacon and cook until it is crisp and browned, about 5 minutes. Add the meat and season with salt and pepper and sear for about 2 minutes per side.
  • Add in the onion and jalapeño and let them soften for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the garlic and before it browns, in less than a minute, add the chopped tomatoes. Stir here and there and let it all season for about 4 to 5 minutes.
  • In a skillet or comal, set over medium-low heat, heat the tortillas. It will take about 1 minute per side. Place the tortillas in a tortilla warmer or wrap them in a clean kitchen towel or cloth napkin.
  • Serve along with the tenderloin tips; guests can fill the tortillas with the amount of filling they desire.

Notes

Tacos al albañil

Chicken Flautas

Pati Jinich Chicken Flautas recipe
Print Recipe
4.34 from 6 votes

Chicken Flautas

Chicken Flautas recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 5 “Mexican-Style Kids’ Party”
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chicken, corn tortillas, guacamole, lettuce, mexican crema, pati's mexican table, queso fresco, Tomatoes
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 16 corn tortillas
  • 2 cups cooked and shredded chicken
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 cup Mexican cream
  • 1 cup salsa of your choice
  • 1 head romaine lettuce sliced
  • 1 cup queso fresco crumbled
  • Serve with guacamole or salsa verde

Instructions

  • In a deep skillet, preheat 1 inch deep of oil to 350 degrees, set over medium heat. Or you can also test if the oil is ready for frying the flautas, by dipping a flauta or tortilla to see if the oil actively bubbles around it.
  • Place a comal or a dry skillet over medium heat until hot, then heat the tortillas on the comal for about 30 seconds per side; this will prevent them from breaking when rolling them into flautas.
  • Place 1 to 2 tablespoons of shredded chicken on each tortilla and roll them tightly. They should be thin, not chubby rolls. You can insert wooden toothpicks through 2 to 3 flautas at a time, so they will fry evenly and hold their shape.
  • Once the oil is hot, gently dip the flautas in it. Fry them until they have crisped and turned golden, about 2 to 3 minutes. Flip them over so they will brown evenly, for another minute. Remove the flautas from the oil and put them on a plate or tray lined with paper towels.
  • Alternatively, you may want to toast the flautas on a comal or bake in the oven lightly brushed with oil at 375, for 15 to 20 minutes.
  • Arrange them on a serving platter and garnish with lettuce, cheese, Mexican cream and salsa, or let your guests tailor to their taste.

Notes

Flautas de pollo

Eat your Tacos de Lengua, or else I will

When it comes to eating meat, Mexico goes from nose to tail. From menudo to pancita, and from tostadas de pata to tacos de cabeza, not only do we know how to cook each part well, we go on to dress and celebrate it on the plate.

As for me, the only part I haven’t warmed up to is sesos. My dad tricked me into eating some, when I was Juju’s age, in a quesadilla from a street stand that he said was filled with potatoes (…caught you on the first bite, papi!).

No doubt, one of the most popular and tastiest parts is the tongue.

Not a fan? Then you just haven’t given it a real try. With abandon and an open mind.

Oh, what’s that? You tried it and haven’t been converted yet? Then I assure you, what you have tried wasn’t cooked right.

If you are not a meat eater…go ahead, skip this post. Or by the time you are done, you will have witnessed an ode to the tongue.

Take one of the simplest ways we prepare it: cooked in a gently simmering broth, seasoned with a subtle combination of herbs and spices, until utterly tender. Then it is peeled, diced, and given a quick sear along with chopped onions and a sprinkle of salt. It ends up a perfectly browned, melt in your mouth, crazy good tasting filling for tacos when generously spooned on warm corn tortillas

tacos de lengua

Having a gamey taste and that ridiculously tender texture, the best salsa to pair it with is a tangy and punchy cooked salsa verde

tacos de lengua with salsa

And a must: garnish with fresh, bright cilantro.

tacos de lengua with salsa and cilantro

Also a must: top it off with crunchy, sweet white onion.

finished tacos de lengua

That is your basic, most exquisite tongue taco.

After tacos de lengua, my favorite way of eating tongue is in a stew, either with salsa verde and potatoes or a la veracruzana. But we have to leave something for a next time…

tacos de lengua
Print Recipe
4.75 from 4 votes

Tongue Tacos

If you are not a meat eater…go ahead, skip this post. Or by the time you are done, you will have witnessed an ode to the tongue. Take one of the simplest ways we prepare it: cooked in a gently simmering broth, seasoned with a subtle combination of herbs and spices, until utterly tender. Then it is peeled, diced, and given a quick sear along with chopped onions and a sprinkle of salt. It ends up a perfectly browned, melt in your mouth, crazy good tasting filling for tacos when generously spooned on warm corn tortillas…
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time2 hrs 10 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: beef, cilantro, corn tortillas, garlic, lime, onion, salsa verde, tongue
Servings: 5 to 6 tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 whole beef tongue, about 3 to 4 pounds cut into 2 to 3 pieces(ask the butcher or do it yourself)
  • 1 head of garlic outer dry peel removed split in half horizontally
  • 1 white onion outer peel removed, split in half horizontally
  • 5 whole dried bay leaves
  • 15 black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or coarse sea salt plus more for seasoning
  • To taste freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped white onion, divided (1/4 for cooking with the meat and 1/4 to reserve for garnish)
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves and upper part of stems coarsely chopped
  • 1 batch of Cooked Salsa Verde
  • 1 lime cut in quarters, optional garnish
  • 10 to 12 corn tortillas

Instructions

  • Place tongue, garlic, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns, marjoram, thyme, oregano and 1 tablespoon salt in a casserole or soup pot. Cover with water up to 2 inches above the tongue.
  • Bring to a rolling boil over high heat, then reduce to a gentle medium simmer, cover with a tight fitting lid and cook for 3 hours, or until the tongue is completely tender and soft. Check the water halfway through and add more hot water if need be to keep the tongue mostly covered.
  • Turn off the heat. Let cool slightly in the liquid until you are ready to eat.
  • Remove the tongue from the broth and place on a chopping board. Using a small sharp knife and your hands, remove the outer layer of skin, as well as the bottom part of the tongue, which would attach it to the mouth, as it tends to be harder and greasy. The tongue is easier to peel if it is still warm or hot.
  • Slice into 1/4-inch slices and cut into about a 1/4-inch dice.
  • Heat oil in a medium-sized skillet over medium-high heat. Add 1/4 cup of the chopped onion and cook for a couple minutes, until softened. Incorporate diced tongue, season with salt and pepper to taste, and cook for about 4 to 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned and the onion has completely softened. Turn off the heat.
  • Heat corn tortillas on an already heated comal over medium heat. Make sure the tortillas are thoroughly heated and lightly browned on both sides. Place in a clean kitchen towel and wrap to keep warm, or keep in a tortilla warmer.
  • Place the tongue in a bowl and start assembling the tacos: spoon a generous amount of tongue in the middle of the tortilla, spoon a generous amount of salsa verde on top, and garnish with fresh chopped onion and cilantro. If desired, add a gentle squeeze of fresh lime juice.

Notes

Tacos de Lengua

Tacos de Canasta

Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Tacos de Canasta

Tacos de Canasta recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 3 “Taco Night”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time55 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cheese, cilantro, corn tortillas, epazote, garlic, green onions, jalapeno, onion, pati's mexican table, requesón, tacos, Tomatoes
Servings: 12 tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 1/2 -inch slice of white onion
  • 3 cloves garlic
  • 12 corn tortillas
  • 1/2 cup finely sliced scallions or cebollitas de cambray in Mexico
  • 1 jalapeno chile seeded and finely chopped, more or less to taste
  • 1 pound roma tomatoes chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 1/2 cup chopped cilantro or epazote
  • 1 pound (about 2 1/2 cups) requesón or farmer’s cheese

Instructions

  • Prepare a basket: Line it with large, thick layers of plastic wrap to cover the entire interior of the basket (they should be big enough that they cover the interior of the basket and fold over the top). Place a couple kitchen towels in the bottom of the basket on top of the plastic. Lastly, add butchers’ style paper or parchment paper on top of the kitchen towels and on the side of the basket.
  • In a large skillet over medium heat, heat enough oil to come 1/2-inch up the sides of the pan. Once hot, add the onion slice and garlic cloves, let them brown for at least 10 minutes.
  • Pass the corn tortillas, one by one with a set of tongs, “through hot oil.” That is, quickly fry for 3 seconds per side, and set on a cooling rack or plate covered with paper towels, until all are done.
  • In another skillet, set over medium heat, pour 3 tablespoons of the onion and garlic seasoned oil. Once hot, add the scallions or cebollitas and chile, and cook for about 3 to 4 minutes until softened. Add the tomatoes and salt, and cook stirring occasionally, for about 8 to 10 minutes until completely cooked and mushy. Stir in cilantro or epazote, cook for a couple more minutes and remove from heat. In a mixing bowl, combine the requesón, along with the tomato mixture and season with more salt to taste, if needed.
  • Pre-heat a comal or skillet over medium heat.
  • One by one, add a couple tablespoons of the cheese and tomato mix into a fried tortilla and fold into a half-moon shape. Repeat with the rest of the tortillas. (You may eat them at this point, but they won’t be “basket” or “sweaty” tacos yet!) Place the filled tortillas on the hot comal or skillet. Heat thoroughly for about a minute per side.
  • Arrange the heated tacos in layers in the basket as they come off comal. Once you are done, add another layer of paper over the tacos, cover with another kitchen towel, and finally the plastic, which should fold over it all from the interior lining of the basket. Let the tacos rest and sweat (at least 10 minutes) and keep covered until ready to eat.
  • Serve with your choice of salsa, slices of Mexican avocado or pickled jalapeños.

Bricklayer Tacos

A taco is a beautiful thing.

One of the most satisfying, versatile, exciting, and downright honest foods I can think of.

Plus, there is no need or mood a taco can’t tackle.

You are hungry and have but one peso in your pocket? Eat a Taco de Nada. You pass a tortillería on your way home? A Taco de Sal will hold you off until you get there. A deep hangover ails you? Go for Tacos de Barbacoa with Salsa Borracha. Did you say you have a broken heart? A pair of fully stocked Tacos al Pastor will be your most effective rebound. You are home with a cold? Soft chicken tacos dipped in fresh crema will make you all better, no doubt about that. Need to feed your teen kid and his buddies before they head out? Crispy Potato and Chorizo Tacos dressed with shredded lettuce, crumbled queso fresco and Salsa Verde will make them happy and fill them up. It’s lunchtime and you are on the road? If you are in Mexico (or somewhere with a large Mexican community), you will find someone with a huge basket selling Tacos Sudados to go. Planning a backyard party? Tacos de Carnitas will kick it off, without you even saying a word.

I could write an endless post on all sorts of tacos and all they can do for you… But, if you want to feed your family a generous, satiating, and super tasty weeknight meal, make them bricklayer tacos. Step by step instructions follow below. But as I cook, let me quickly reflect on The Taco.

bacon for bricklayer tacos
Start with a large casserole or skillet and fry some bacon. Until crisp.

Whenever I teach Mexican cooking, I never fail to say that the food of a country resembles its people. The taco, the most emblematic of Mexican foods, fully embodies Mexico and its people. Through the gazillion different kinds of tacos that have existed, we can explore the evolution of Mexico and the identity of Mexicans. The stories told by each taco, linked to one another, holds us Mexicans (and Mexican food lovers) together.  I am getting a tad too philosophical about tacos, I know… but just think about the possibilities.

meat cooking in the bacon
You don’t need to add any other fat. You will add tender pieces of tenderloin or sirloin straight into the bacon fat. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and let the meat brown without fully cooking.

There is no exact date on when the taco came to be. It existed before the Spaniards arrived in Mexico, in pre-Hispanic times, for sure. There is anthropological evidence that it was thousands, not hundreds of years, before the Spanish conquest that people in Mexico were eating tacos (even if they weren’t called that). Indigenous people had domesticated corn and found a way to make it fully nutritious by way of the nixtamalization process (where corn is shucked, dried, cooked in slaked lime or ashes, hulled and ground) and turned into a malleable dough to be used in a thousand different ways, including tamales, drinks, all sorts of patties and that flat bread we call tortilla.

adding onion and jalapenos to the bricklayer taco filling
Add onion and jalapeños.

Now, how long since has the tortilla been used as an edible plate, or torn into pieces to scoop up food as an edible spoon, or held in hand to wrap a filling to munch on? I am guessing more years than you probably are. The filling could have been cactus paddle or iguana, who knows.

adding garlic to the bricklayer taco filling
Add garlic and cook for less than a minute, until garlic is fragrant.

The first documented tacos appeared in the “Truthful History of the Conquest of New Spain” (1520), by Bernal Diaz del Castillo, a conquistador. He reported a taco feast, enjoyed by Hernán Cortes and many of his commanders, where many kinds of fillings were eaten wrapped in tortillas. Friar Bernardino de Sahagún, a Spanish ethnographer, also wrote about many different kinds of tortillas based on corn (different colors including yellow, blue and white; small and large; thin and thick) during the time of the conquest, in his “General History of the Things in new Spain.” It wasn’t until the Spanish arrived that the flour tortilla came to be, as they are the ones who introduced wheat.

charred tomatoes
Add chopped roasted tomatoes. This is how they need to look, charred, juicy and mushy.

According to Jeffrey M. Pilcher, Mexican silver miners invented the taco, but he is most likely referring to the word… The word taco also refers to any small piece of material that can fit into a hole or gap, such as the pieces of paper wrapped around gun powder that were used to extract precious metals from ore, in that same shape. Workers in Mexican silver mines in the 18th century called their meals Tacos Mineros. Though there may be a link to the shape of the other kind of “tacos,” we know for a fact that edible tacos have existed for thousands of years before those…

chopped charred tomatoes
Did I say chop up the tomatoes?

So yes, indeed, there are Tacos Mineros, but there are also tacos for and of absolutely EVERYTHING else, including the Tacos de Albañíl, or Bricklayer-style Tacos, that I am here showing you how to make. They’ve been baptized as such, for they are quick to prepare, very filling and need nothing else to be added on the side or on top.

They can also be prepared on site in a comal and  can use any kind of available meat, as long as it is cut in small bite size pieces. Tacos de albañíl sellers an also be  found near construction sites. Just walk around Mexico City, or come over on a weeknight: It is also one of my family’s favorite fast meals. And you get to pick what kind of tortilla you want, flour or corn.

adding charred tomatoes to the bricklayer taco filling
Add to the mix and cook for a few more minutes.

Soft taco, crispy taco, hard shell taco (wish I didn’t have to say Taco Bell taco but we can’t ignore they have in a way helped to spread the word), puffy taco… I hope you add these Bricklayer-style Tacos to your collection of taco recipes.

finished bricklayer taco filling
You are done. Set it on the table.

Wait, you don’t have a taco recipe collection? Make this your first one!

bricklayer tacos
Warm up your choice of tortillas, corn or flour. And let everyone have a go!
bricklayer tacos
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Bricklayer Tacos

I could write an endless post on all sorts of tacos and all they can do for you… But, if you want to feed your family a generous, satiating, and super tasty weeknight meal, make them bricklayer tacos. Step by step instructions follow below. But as I cook, let me quickly reflect on The Taco.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: bacon, beef, corn tortillas, flour tortillas, garlic, jalapeno, onion, Recipe, Taco, Tomatoes
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces bacon sliced
  • 2 pounds beef sirloin or tenderloin cut into 1-inch pieces
  • To taste kosher or sea salt
  • To taste freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups white onion slivered or sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves chopped
  • 1 jalapeno chile sliced, seeding optional, or to taste
  • 1 pound ripe Roma tomatoes
  • Flour or corn tortillas

Instructions

  • Place tomatoes in a baking dish and under the broiler for 6 to 9 minutes, until charred, mushy and juices have begun to run. Once cool, roughly chop, but don’t discard the juices.
  • Heat the skillet, add the bacon and cook until it is crisp and browned, about 5 minutes. Add the meat and season with salt and pepper and sear for about 2 minutes per side.
  • Add in the onion and jalapeño and let them soften for 2 to 3 minutes. Add the garlic and before it browns, in less than a minute, add the chopped tomatoes. Stir here and there and let it all season for about 4 to 5 minutes.
  • In a skillet or comal, set over medium-low heat, heat the tortillas. It will take about 1 minute per side. Place the tortillas in a tortilla warmer or wrap them in a clean kitchen towel or cloth napkin.
  • Serve along with the tenderloin tips; guests can fill the tortillas with the amount of filling they desire.

Notes

Tacos al Albañil

Tostada Buzz: To infinity, and beyond!

I am so surprised tostadas haven’t become wildly popular in the US. Here are some reasons for my surprise…

They can be assembled in a couple minutes, as ingredients can be prepared beforehand or store-bought. They can be eaten anytime of day, depending on what you layer on them. They are a wholesome one stop meal, for proteins, vegetables and carbohydrates happily mingle in there. They are accommodating, you can decide how much to add of each topping. They are forgiving, choices can vary from one tostada to the next. Moreover, they are fun to prepare, eat and share.

In a sense, they are the perfect dish for casual entertaining. So much of Mexican food just lends itself to being in a Fiesta mood.

What can you layer on a tostada? Well, almost anything! There are regional specialties, traditional favorites, modern twists and family staples. Yet, after the hundreds of variations there is a lot of room to play and create your own. But for a memorable tostada, you need to know some simple basics.

First of all, start with a good tostada. A tostada is a corn tortilla that is either toasted (that is what the word tostada translates to in English) or deep fried until golden and crisp.

Now, you can go as hands on as you want. You can make your own tortillas or buy the already made tortillas and make your own tostadas. But there are pretty good ready to eat tostadas at the stores. If that’s the way you want to go, try a couple brands to see which you like best. They do taste different. Once you have the tostadas, you already have a filling, crunchy and sturdy base for your creation.

The most common tostadas add a layer of smooth and tasty refried beans, home made or store bought. From there, you can go many ways.

My sister Karen likes to host tostada parties. She places a basket with tostadas, a bowl of refried beans and different hearty toppings (which shouldn’t be too saucy, just nice and moist, as tostadas are somewhat flat), such as chicken tinga and shredded beef in a chile sauce. She plates fresh garnishes, like Mexican avocado, tomatoes, lettuce, onion, cream and crumbled cheese. Her guests just go around the table adding whatever they feel like on top.

I will leave you with the ones I make most often at home. My kids are happy adding crumbled cheese and Mexican cream on top of the refried beans. I am more satisfied throwing in some shredded chicken, tomato, lettuce, ripe avocado and a salsa verde, made with tomatillos, to drizzle on top.

Don’t let any version stop you though. You may start with the tostadas and the refried beans. From there… it is up to your imagination. It can go to infinity, and beyond.

Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Basic Tostadas

I am so surprised tostadas haven’t become wildly popular in the US. Here are some reasons for my surprise…They can be assembled in a couple minutes, as ingredients can be prepared beforehand or store-bought. They can be eaten anytime of day, depending on what you layer on them. They are a wholesome one stop meal, for proteins, vegetables and carbohydrates happily mingle in there. They are accommodating, you can decide how much to add of each topping. They are forgiving, choices can vary from one tostada to the next. Moreover, they are fun to prepare, eat and share.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Course: Antojos
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Avocado, beans, chicken, corn tortillas, cotija, mexican crema, pati's mexican table, queso fresco, Recipe, refried beans, salsa verde, Tomatoes, tortilla
Servings: 12 tostadas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 12 corn tostadas
  • 2 cups refried beans warmed up
  • 2 cups shredded chicken
  • 1 cup finely sliced iceberg or romaine lettuce
  • 1 ripe Mexican avocado pitted, peeled and sliced
  • 1 cup tomato sliced
  • 1/2 cup Mexican or Latin style cream
  • 1 cup green tomatillo salsa or your salsa of choice
  • 1 cup Cotija, Fresco or Farmers Cheese crumbled

Instructions

  • Place the tostadas on a large platter and all of the toppings and garnishes in separate bowls.
  • For a complete basic tostada: Layer a couple tablespoons of refried beans on the tostada. Spread a couple tablespoons of shredded chicken, lettuce, and one or two slices each of avocado and tomato. Top it all with a tablespoon or so of crumbled cheese and cream. Drizzle some green salsa, if you wish, to your liking.

Notes

Tostadas