Cesina

Marinated Pork
Print Recipe
6 servings Cesina
Ingredients
  • 12 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound pork cutlets thinly sliced
  • Vegetable oil to grill
To Prepare
  • Place chiles on an already hot comal or skillet set over medium heat. Toast for about 1 minute per side, flipping as they toast. Place in bowl and cover with boiling hot water. Let them soak until they plump and rehydrate, for about 20 to 30 minutes.
  • Place the re-hydrated chiles and 1 cup of their soaking liquid in the blender, along with the garlic, vinegar, oregano, marjoram, thyme, salt and pepper and puree until completely smooth. Strain into a container and set aside. It can be stored covered in the refrigerator for up to a couple months.
  • One by one, or two by two, place the meat slices on a chopping board in between sheets of parchment paper. With a meat mallet, pound until very thin, until you can see the paper under the meat, but it is not completely breaking apart thin, about 1/8-inch thick.
  • Once you are done, one by one, generously brush with the marinade on both sides of the meat to completely cover. You may cook immediately or refrigerate covered for up to 24 hours.
  • When ready to cook, set the charcoal or gas grill, outside, to medium-high heat. Or to cook indoors, place a grill pan over medium-high heat. When hot, brush with vegetable oil. Grill the meat for about 1 to 2 minutes per side until completely cooked.
Ingredients
  • 12 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 pound pork cutlets thinly sliced
  • Vegetable oil to grill
To Prepare
  • Place chiles on an already hot comal or skillet set over medium heat. Toast for about 1 minute per side, flipping as they toast. Place in bowl and cover with boiling hot water. Let them soak until they plump and rehydrate, for about 20 to 30 minutes.
  • Place the re-hydrated chiles and 1 cup of their soaking liquid in the blender, along with the garlic, vinegar, oregano, marjoram, thyme, salt and pepper and puree until completely smooth. Strain into a container and set aside. It can be stored covered in the refrigerator for up to a couple months.
  • One by one, or two by two, place the meat slices on a chopping board in between sheets of parchment paper. With a meat mallet, pound until very thin, until you can see the paper under the meat, but it is not completely breaking apart thin, about 1/8-inch thick.
  • Once you are done, one by one, generously brush with the marinade on both sides of the meat to completely cover. You may cook immediately or refrigerate covered for up to 24 hours.
  • When ready to cook, set the charcoal or gas grill, outside, to medium-high heat. Or to cook indoors, place a grill pan over medium-high heat. When hot, brush with vegetable oil. Grill the meat for about 1 to 2 minutes per side until completely cooked.

10 comments on “Cesina

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  1. This recipe made a wonderful tasting Cesina on my second attempt. My first attempt created a terrible accident. This recipe dopes not contain enough information about roasting chilis.
    I am a novice at roasting chilis and ended up filling up my two story house with capsaicin fumes. During my first attempt I had serious trouble breathing almost getting overwhelmed by the fumes. I had burning burning eyes and a horrible cough. I had trouble trying to get the house aired out so I could breathe. Placing a cloth over my mouth and nose I opened all the windows and used the kitchen fan and a tornado fan to help remove the fumes from my kitchen and home. My neighbor came over, walked 8 feet into my home before the fumes overwhelmed her and she had to leave.
    The capsaicin particles on my hands did not burn my hands but burned my eyes and any moist place I touched with mu hands. After several attempts to wash off the capsaicin particles I finally Googled for a solution. That made me think I should rub my hands liberally with olive oil and then wash them with dish detergent, it worked about 95%. I found that I had capsaicin particles all over my face. I used a damp cloth to lightly rub off as much of the capsaicin particles as I could and then I gingerly washed off my face with charcoal soap. One day later I can still feel a bit of a discomfort in my throat and eyes.

    For those of us beginners of Mexican cooking we need more chili help then this recipe provided. Pati you made it look so easy but that was deceptive. Please help with more chili roasting info as I love the taste of your recipes. The next day I attempted the recipe again. On my second attempt I cooked the chilis about 30 seconds on a side which is half of what the recipe directed. But I still feel I did not do it correctly. I think it would be very big help for you to do a tutorial about chilis, how to handle them and how to roast them.

    1. I’m sorry to hear you had trouble with roasting the chiles, but I’m glad you enjoyed the dish. I will be happy to do a Chile tutorial in upcoming episodes. Thanks for your feedback!

  2. I love your show and encourage all my ladyfriends to watch (especially my Mexican ladies, who will be joining me for dinner tomorrow night). I’ll be making corn con queso soup, cesina sandwiches and the avocado/watercress/pecan salad, substituting mache for watercress. I am urging my friends to watch your program to see just how diverse Mexican cuisine truly is, beyond tacos, rice and beans!

  3. I’m trying this recipe with beef and I hope it comes out good, thank you !!! but do you eat with this sandwich ?No beans my son hate them. ( takes after his father ) ,

  4. Hi Pati.
    You are one of y favorite PBS cooks. I am so grateful to you for sharing your traditional and not so traditional recipes.