Homemade Cajeta or Dulce de Leche

Homemade Cajeta or Dulce de Leche
Print Recipe
make about 3 cups Cajeta Casera
Ingredients
  • 8 cups or 2 liters goat's milk, you can substitute or combine with cow’s milk
  • 2 1/2 cups dark brown sugar or shredded piloncillo
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
To Prepare
  • Place a large pot (I use my new copper one!) over medium heat. Pour milk, vanilla, sugar and baking soda, give it a good stir and let it come to a simmer. Keep it at a steady medium simmer for about one hour and a half, stirring occasionally, every 15 to 20 minutes or so, with a wooden spatula or spoon. The mix will gradually thicken and darken.
  • After about an hour and a half, the liquid will have thickened and reduced and the simmer will become stronger. Reduce the heat to medium low, to keep it at that constant medium simmer. You want active bubbling, but not over the top angry bubbles. Stir a bit more frequently, as you don’t want the bottom to develop a thicker layer.
  • You know the cajeta is ready when: It achieves a caramel brown color; it is thick as liquid caramel or syrup, much like a chocolate syrup consistency; it envelops the back of the spoon; when you gently stir across the pot with your wooden spoon, a slightly delayed trail behind the spoon appears, revealing the bottom of the pot if only for a few seconds; as you slowly lift up the wooden spoon or spatula, cajeta takes it’s time to drop and lastly, the sides of the pot show how the cajeta has cooked down and if you run your spoon across that side, you get a fudgy (and delicious) residue.
  • Turn off the heat and let cool (it will thicken considerably as it cools).
  • Place in a glass jar, cover tightly with a lid. It will keep in refrigerator for up to 6 months.
Ingredients
  • 8 cups or 2 liters goat's milk, you can substitute or combine with cow’s milk
  • 2 1/2 cups dark brown sugar or shredded piloncillo
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
To Prepare
  • Place a large pot (I use my new copper one!) over medium heat. Pour milk, vanilla, sugar and baking soda, give it a good stir and let it come to a simmer. Keep it at a steady medium simmer for about one hour and a half, stirring occasionally, every 15 to 20 minutes or so, with a wooden spatula or spoon. The mix will gradually thicken and darken.
  • After about an hour and a half, the liquid will have thickened and reduced and the simmer will become stronger. Reduce the heat to medium low, to keep it at that constant medium simmer. You want active bubbling, but not over the top angry bubbles. Stir a bit more frequently, as you don’t want the bottom to develop a thicker layer.
  • You know the cajeta is ready when: It achieves a caramel brown color; it is thick as liquid caramel or syrup, much like a chocolate syrup consistency; it envelops the back of the spoon; when you gently stir across the pot with your wooden spoon, a slightly delayed trail behind the spoon appears, revealing the bottom of the pot if only for a few seconds; as you slowly lift up the wooden spoon or spatula, cajeta takes it’s time to drop and lastly, the sides of the pot show how the cajeta has cooked down and if you run your spoon across that side, you get a fudgy (and delicious) residue.
  • Turn off the heat and let cool (it will thicken considerably as it cools).
  • Place in a glass jar, cover tightly with a lid. It will keep in refrigerator for up to 6 months.

6 comments on “Homemade Cajeta or Dulce de Leche

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  1. Thank you Pati, you were correct. I tried again with dark brown sugar and it worked beautifully. It is really unbelievable. I wanted to make it to use in recipes (your upside down flan cake, cinnamon rolls…) but I think that I will use it all up drizzling it on my oatmeal or plain yogurt – both of which are amazing. Saw you and JuJu on The Chew yesterday – you are so full of life and fun. Thank you for your help.

  2. Hi Patti – I love your show and I love learning how to cook authentic Mexican. So thank you for teaching us. My family loves everything of yours that I’ve made. As a mom of 4 boys, I love when your boys join you in the kitchen – I can see how much they care for you. I have attempted making cajeta a number of times but it keeps curdling or something that looks like curdling. I am using goats’ milk from Whole Foods that is fresh. I wonder if the problem is the sugar. I live in the Northeast and Mexican ingredients are hard to find, but I do want to cook as authentically as possible. I did find a cane sugar called Panela which I thought was the same as piloncello. After grating, I wasn’t sure if it should be packed when measuring it. Maybe my quantity is wrong. For 8 cups of milk, I use 1 pound of panela. It seems like the baking soda could be reacting with the panela to cause the curdling because during one attempt, I added it later (mixed with a little reserved milk)(trying to figure out the problem) and it seized up at that point. Any thoughts?

    1. Hola Leila!!
      That is interesting. I suggest you make it with the same goat’s milk but use dark brown sugar instead. It shouldn’t curdle. Make sure you cook it at a steady medium-medium low simmer… All my best to you and your 4 boys… I always thought that we would have 4 boys… and then… we stopped at 3!

  3. Homemade Cajeta or Dulce de Leche
    Cajeta Casera

    Patti – I just watched this episode on CreateTV (Sun., Aug. 30) and I thought your nephew(?) said it had salt in the dulce de leche, however, I don’t see any salt measurement in the recipe.

    Please advise.

    Thank you,
    Debbie
    Kearny, NJ