Enchiladas Mineras

Enchiladas Mineras
Print Recipe
12 enchiladas
Ingredients
  • For the guajillo chile salsa:
  • 15 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 1 garlic clove peeled
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • For the enchiladas:
  • 2 cups crumbled queso fresco ranchero or cotija, or farmer’s cheese, crumbled (about 8 ounces)
  • 4 tablespoons finely chopped white onion
  • 1 pound red potatoes peeled and cut into small dice
  • 1 pound carrots peeled and cut into small dice
  • 4 radishes rinsed thoroughly and cut into small dice
  • 4 romaine lettuce leaves rinsed and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons white distilled vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste, plus more to salt the water
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Pinch of sugar
  • Pickled blond peppers or pepperoncini or pickled jalapeños
To Prepare
  • On an already hot comal or skillet set over medium-low heat, toast the chiles for about 15 seconds per side. The inner skin will turn opaque and the outer skin will crisp. Place them in a medium saucepan, cover with hot water and set over medium-high heat. Let them simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until they rehydrate, soften and plump up.
  • In the jar of a blender, place chiles along with 1 1/2 cups of their soaking liquid, the garlic, oregano and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Puree until completely smooth. In a medium saucepan set over medium-high heat, pour the oil. Once hot, but not smoking, add the guajillo chile sauce and cover with a lid ajar, as the sauce will be jumping. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, add the chicken broth and cook a couple minutes more. Turn off the heat and keep covered.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine the queso fresco with the chopped onion. Set aside.
  • In a medium saucepan, bring salted water to a rolling boil over medium-high heat. Add the potatoes and cook for 4 to 5 minutes until cooked through but not mushy. Scoop out with a spider or a slotted spoon and place in a bowl. In the same water, add the carrots and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until cooked but still firm. Scoop them out, place in the same bowl and set aside. Once the vegetables have cooled a little bit, add the radishes and lettuce. In a small bowl, mix the vinegar with the oils, 1/4 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste, and a pinch of sugar. Whisk well and pour over the vegetables.
  • When ready to eat, have the guajillo salsa warmed up. Place a comal or skillet over medium-low heat and wait until it is very hot. One by one heat the corn tortillas, about 15 to 20 seconds per side, until they barely begin to toast. With a pair of tongs, dip each tortilla into the guajillo salsa on one side and then the other. The tortilla will barely get “wet” and soften in the sauce. You don’t want to pour this sauce on top, as it is rather bitter, it should just be a light coating.
  • On a plate, set the “wet” tortilla and place 2 to 3 tablespoons of the queso fresco in the middle. Fold the tortilla making a half moon shape. Prepare one by one, or all one after the other, and place on a platter.
  • Garnish with the dressed potatoes, carrots, radishes and lettuce. Place pickled peppers on the side.
Ingredients
  • For the guajillo chile salsa:
  • 15 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 1 garlic clove peeled
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken or vegetable broth
  • For the enchiladas:
  • 2 cups crumbled queso fresco ranchero or cotija, or farmer’s cheese, crumbled (about 8 ounces)
  • 4 tablespoons finely chopped white onion
  • 1 pound red potatoes peeled and cut into small dice
  • 1 pound carrots peeled and cut into small dice
  • 4 radishes rinsed thoroughly and cut into small dice
  • 4 romaine lettuce leaves rinsed and thinly sliced
  • 2 tablespoons white distilled vinegar
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste, plus more to salt the water
  • freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • Pinch of sugar
  • Pickled blond peppers or pepperoncini or pickled jalapeños
To Prepare
  • On an already hot comal or skillet set over medium-low heat, toast the chiles for about 15 seconds per side. The inner skin will turn opaque and the outer skin will crisp. Place them in a medium saucepan, cover with hot water and set over medium-high heat. Let them simmer for 10 to 15 minutes until they rehydrate, soften and plump up.
  • In the jar of a blender, place chiles along with 1 1/2 cups of their soaking liquid, the garlic, oregano and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Puree until completely smooth. In a medium saucepan set over medium-high heat, pour the oil. Once hot, but not smoking, add the guajillo chile sauce and cover with a lid ajar, as the sauce will be jumping. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, add the chicken broth and cook a couple minutes more. Turn off the heat and keep covered.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine the queso fresco with the chopped onion. Set aside.
  • In a medium saucepan, bring salted water to a rolling boil over medium-high heat. Add the potatoes and cook for 4 to 5 minutes until cooked through but not mushy. Scoop out with a spider or a slotted spoon and place in a bowl. In the same water, add the carrots and cook for 3 to 4 minutes until cooked but still firm. Scoop them out, place in the same bowl and set aside. Once the vegetables have cooled a little bit, add the radishes and lettuce. In a small bowl, mix the vinegar with the oils, 1/4 teaspoon salt, pepper to taste, and a pinch of sugar. Whisk well and pour over the vegetables.
  • When ready to eat, have the guajillo salsa warmed up. Place a comal or skillet over medium-low heat and wait until it is very hot. One by one heat the corn tortillas, about 15 to 20 seconds per side, until they barely begin to toast. With a pair of tongs, dip each tortilla into the guajillo salsa on one side and then the other. The tortilla will barely get “wet” and soften in the sauce. You don’t want to pour this sauce on top, as it is rather bitter, it should just be a light coating.
  • On a plate, set the “wet” tortilla and place 2 to 3 tablespoons of the queso fresco in the middle. Fold the tortilla making a half moon shape. Prepare one by one, or all one after the other, and place on a platter.
  • Garnish with the dressed potatoes, carrots, radishes and lettuce. Place pickled peppers on the side.

22 comments on “Enchiladas Mineras

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  1. I have a fantastic idea ! Send me your latest cookbook “signed by you, please, I’ll pay for it. My address is 3404 Rall Ct. Arlington, Tx
    76015. Richard Filkins. Thank you, Pati, “pretty face” !!!

  2. Hi Pati, first I wanna tell you that I watch your TV show all the time it’s on. I want to try your enchiladas recipe, they look so good and I can’t wait to cook them. I have a recipe from a friend in Chicago and I usually cook her’s but I can’t wait to cook your’s. I am eventually going to get your cookbook. Thanks so much for your show and by the way, I think you are so pretty ! I wish I could find someone like you and someone who is close as pretty as you are. Keep on cooking and I can’t wait to try some of your recipes Richard from Texas.

  3. Pati, my late grandmother was from Guanajuato. When I saw the episode that replayed this evening I realized I’m going to have to put the city on my travel bucket list. Thank you! Loved the episode.

  4. Hello Pati,
    I caught your show. I enjoy the way you describe your dishes. You thoroughly explain the flavors. That helps us recreate them. I live in San Antonio,Texas. I was raised on the border of Laredo and Nuevo Laredo. We had a lady from Mexico that cooked for our home. Watching you brings back memories of when I watched her cook. Keep up the great work. Love you and your food choices.
    Con mucho Amor,
    Magda Quintana

  5. Hello Pati,
    I Just wanted to say I love you watch your show. The foods you make look incredible and very interesting. I always love to try new things, and although I am not Hispanic, I Love Love Love to cook Hispanic foods. Especially Mexican Recipes. Love Spices (spicier the BETTER), Love Sauces. Keep up the Fantastic Work. Wish I could Eat the food after YOU make it…
    Thank You So Much…

  6. Hola Pati;
    Me encanta tu programa, la manera en que describes los olores y sabores de tus platillos es genial.
    Por primera vez en US que veo la receta tradicional de salsa para enchiladas, y no como usualmente la que preparan aquí con Salsa del “Cuac”. En una visita a Guanajuato recuerdo haber leído en la carta de un restaurante este platillo, solo que te lo presentaban de dos maneras; Enchiladas de Minero Pobre o Enchiladas de Minero Rico. La diferencia era que el de Minero Rico venía acompañado con Pollo.
    Gracias por mostrar esa parte tan maravillosa de nuestro México al resto del Mundo.

  7. Do not use the soaking liquid, that is what makes the salsa bitter use plain water or chicken broth instead