Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains

Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains

Capirotada con Mango y Plátano Macho
10 to 12 servings
Pati Jinich
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: baguette, banana, bolillo, bread, brown sugar, canela, capirotada, ceylon, cinnamon, cloves, cotija cheese, mango, pati’s mexican table, Peanuts, piloncillo, Plantains, raisins, star anise, telera
Author:Pati Jinich
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 5 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 20 minutes
Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 7 “Jinetes, Adventure in the Mountains”

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, divided
  • 5 to 6 bolillos, teleras or Portuguese buns, or 1 large baguette cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 pound piloncillo, grated, or substitute for 2 cups packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 stick canela, ceylon or true cinnamon
  • 1 whole star anise
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 2 quarts (or 8 cups) water
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 3 ripe plantains, peeled and cut into 1/2-inch diagonal slices (about 3 cups)
  • 1 to 2 large ripe mangoes, peeled and sliced (about 2 cups)
  • 1 cup finely crumbled or grated queso Cotija
  • 2/3 cups roasted peanuts
  • Confectioners’ sugar, for serving

To Prepare

  • Place racks on upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 350°F.
  • Melt 4 tablespoons of the butter in a small pan. Brush the surface of two large baking sheets with some of the melted butter and place the bread slices onto the buttered baking sheets in a single layer. Use the remaining butter to brush on top of the bread slices. Bake for 20 minutes until golden brown on the bottom and remove from the oven.
  • In a medium saucepan, place the piloncillo, cinnamon, star anise, cloves, and raisins, cover with the 8 cups of water, and set over medium-high heat. Once it comes to a simmer, stir occasionally, and let simmer for 30 minutes or until reduced by half. Turn off the heat. With a slotted spoon, remove the cinnamon stick, star anise, and, cloves and discard. Set the piloncillo syrup aside.
  • Add 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon oil to a large saute pan set over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot, cook the plantain slices in a couple batches for about a minute per side, or until golden brown on both sides. Place the browned plantains on a paper towel covered plate and set aside.
  • Use the remaining tablespoon of butter to grease a 9×13-inch baking dish. Add a third of the bread to make the first layer covering the bottom of the baking dish. Distribute all around half of the plantains, half of the mango, half of the Cotija, and half of the peanuts. Pour on about a third of the piloncillo syrup. Start another layer, adding a third of the bread and the remaining half of the plantains, mango, Cotija, and peanuts. Pour another third of the syrup, trying to get all of the raisins in. Finally, cover with the remaining third of the bread and pour the rest of the syrup on top. Cover with aluminum foil.
  • Set oven rack in the middle of the oven. Bake the capirotada for 25 minutes, then remove it from the oven, carefully uncover, and press down with a spatula so it all bakes in the syrup. Cover again with aluminum foil and return to the oven. After another 25 minutes, carefully remove the foil, and bake for about 10 minutes more so the top browns. Cool slightly before serving and sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar.

6 comments on “Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains

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  1. Hi Pati, thank you for all your delicious and traditional recipes! I enjoy watching your show and learning how Mexico is so diverse in flavors and traditions. And your travels through Mexico give viewers like myself an insight of how beautiful Mexico is! Thank you Pati! I look forward trying your version of Capirotada! My husband’s mother gave us her recipe of Capirotada, can you believe that she uses a Mexican green onion in the syrup and garbanzo beans in the evaporated milk mixture (giving it kind of a coffee flavor). Thanks again for a fantastic show, you do a spectacular job (I most definitely prefer watching your show over the Food network).

  2. Hi Pati, thank you so much for the capirotada recipe. I am going to try it,I grew up having capirotada only during lent season. And my mother’s recipe was as different as nite and day compared to yours. She made it with using a mixture milk, alcol de cana (cane), cinnamon,peanuts, raisin, and dried prunes. She would layer the bread after soaking it in this milk mixture, then she would layer a vanilla pudding before the next layer. This vanilla pudding was made from scratch very different right. I am shurely going to try your recipe. My mother said that each region of Mexico has it’s own
    version of capirotada, anyway I just wanted to share this with you. And as a proud mexicana to my core I love your show. You shed a positive light on our fellow mexicans and culture in a time when we are looked down on. I am very proud of you, thank you for that and God bless you and your family.

    1. There are so many ways to make capirotada…and your mom’s recipe sounds great! And thank you for the kind words, Helen. 🧡

  3. Hola Pati!
    This recipe was a big hit on this Thanksgiving Day! I loved everything about this dish. I used bananas and pecans and served it with vanilla ice cream on the side. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family!