Mole Verde with Pork and White Beans

Mole Verde with Pork and White Beans
Print Recipe
6 to 8 servings Mole Verde con Puerco y Frijol Blanco
Ingredients
  • For the Pork and Beans:
  • 4 pounds country style ribs cut into 2-inch chunks, no bones
  • 1 head of garlic cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 white onion halved
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 pound dry small white beans such as navy beans
  • For the Mole Verde:
  • 2 pounds tomatillos husked and rinsed
  • 1 to 2 serrano or jalapeño chiles stemmed
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup white onion coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 4 cups of pork broth reserved from cooking the pork, divided
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh epazote leaves and upper parts of stems
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley leaves and upper parts of stems
  • 3 to 4 teaspoons fresh hoja santa leaves torn into pieces, or substitute 1 dried and crumbled, or skip
  • To garnish chopped white onion
  • To garnish Thinly sliced radishes
  • To garnish Quartered limes to squeeze
To Prepare
  • To cook the pork and beans: Place the pork, garlic, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns and salt into a large soup pot. Cover generously with water. Set over high heat and bring to a rolling boil. Skim off any foam that forms on top, then cover, reduce heat to low and cook until meat is tender, about an hour. Take off the heat. Remove the pork chunks and place in a bowl, set aside.
  • Strain the pork cooking liquid into a large bowl. Set aside 4 cups to use for making the mole verde, and pour the rest of the liquid back into the soup pot. Set over high heat, incorporate the beans, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook for an hour or until tender. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  • To make the mole verde: Place the tomatillos and chiles on a baking sheet and set under the broiler until they are completely charred, soft and mushy, anywhere from 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Place the roasted tomatillos and chiles along with the garlic, onion, salt and pepper in the jar of a blender. Remove and discard the stems from the whole cloves, and add the tops or “berries” (may have already been crumbled) into the jar as well. Add 1 cup of the reserved pork broth and puree until completely smooth.
  • Heat the oil in a large casserole over medium-high heat. Once hot, but not smoking, add the tomatillo puree. Cover partially with a lid and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened considerably and has deepened in color.
  • In the jar of the blender, place the epazote, parsley and hoja santa along with remaining 3 cups of broth, and puree until completely smooth. Add to the casserole with the sauce and stir. When it comes to a simmer, add the reserved pork chunks and beans.
  • Continue cooking at a medium simmer for 25 minutes or until meat is completely coming apart and mole verde has thickened again. Serve and let people garnish as they please with onion, radishes and squeezes of lime.
Ingredients
  • For the Pork and Beans:
  • 4 pounds country style ribs cut into 2-inch chunks, no bones
  • 1 head of garlic cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 white onion halved
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 pound dry small white beans such as navy beans
  • For the Mole Verde:
  • 2 pounds tomatillos husked and rinsed
  • 1 to 2 serrano or jalapeño chiles stemmed
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup white onion coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 4 cups of pork broth reserved from cooking the pork, divided
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh epazote leaves and upper parts of stems
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley leaves and upper parts of stems
  • 3 to 4 teaspoons fresh hoja santa leaves torn into pieces, or substitute 1 dried and crumbled, or skip
  • To garnish chopped white onion
  • To garnish Thinly sliced radishes
  • To garnish Quartered limes to squeeze
To Prepare
  • To cook the pork and beans: Place the pork, garlic, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns and salt into a large soup pot. Cover generously with water. Set over high heat and bring to a rolling boil. Skim off any foam that forms on top, then cover, reduce heat to low and cook until meat is tender, about an hour. Take off the heat. Remove the pork chunks and place in a bowl, set aside.
  • Strain the pork cooking liquid into a large bowl. Set aside 4 cups to use for making the mole verde, and pour the rest of the liquid back into the soup pot. Set over high heat, incorporate the beans, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook for an hour or until tender. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  • To make the mole verde: Place the tomatillos and chiles on a baking sheet and set under the broiler until they are completely charred, soft and mushy, anywhere from 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Place the roasted tomatillos and chiles along with the garlic, onion, salt and pepper in the jar of a blender. Remove and discard the stems from the whole cloves, and add the tops or “berries” (may have already been crumbled) into the jar as well. Add 1 cup of the reserved pork broth and puree until completely smooth.
  • Heat the oil in a large casserole over medium-high heat. Once hot, but not smoking, add the tomatillo puree. Cover partially with a lid and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened considerably and has deepened in color.
  • In the jar of the blender, place the epazote, parsley and hoja santa along with remaining 3 cups of broth, and puree until completely smooth. Add to the casserole with the sauce and stir. When it comes to a simmer, add the reserved pork chunks and beans.
  • Continue cooking at a medium simmer for 25 minutes or until meat is completely coming apart and mole verde has thickened again. Serve and let people garnish as they please with onion, radishes and squeezes of lime.

56 comments on “Mole Verde with Pork and White Beans

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  1. Hi
    Love her show and especially this episode
    I have made pork and work with either pork shoulder or various cuts of pork .
    Love all the different chilies she uses and her exclamation of them as well
    Can’t wait for another episode and would love to see the show where she makes tortillas at home both flour and corn .
    Thank you WETA for her show .
    LOL. 😍💜💜💗💗💋💕💕😘

  2. Delicious love her show so easy to follow
    She’s friendly and precise, very specific regarding different chilies .
    Like to see the episode on how to make tortillas in your home both corn and flour … thanks 😍💜💜💗💗💋

  3. I made this for dinner and wow! It was do good. I could only find dried epazote. How much do you recommend if dried versus fresh? I love your show and your recipes!

  4. Dear Pati, For tonight’s dinner I made the Mole Verde with Pork & White Beans and my husband said that it was a “10”!!! He usually lets me know if he enjoyed a meal that I prepared, but honestly, this is the first time that I received a score…. thank you for sharing these delicious recipes. Love your TV shows and thoroughly enjoyed your trips to Morelia (my late Mom’s home town) & San Miguel de Allende. Looking forward to sharing other trips with you.

  5. I made this mole Verde for last nites dinner and it was a hit, thank you so much for sharing all your culinary wisdom on Mexican food, my parents are from Torreon Cohauila and my mother and I love your show she really admires the fact that you keep it real and authentic with all your recipes, keep up the good work Pati.

  6. My local market doesn’t carry fresh epazote leaves or fresh hoja santa leaves. Where would I find them online? The recipe looks good but I’m at a road block on those two herbs.

    1. You can look for them online…either fresh or you can use dried also. Or if you can’t find either you can substitute the epazote for fresh cilantro and skip the hoja santa.

  7. Hola Pati, can u PLEASE give me YOUR receipt for that good Mexican holiday punch that all mexican,s make on Christmas or Posada !! Thanks you happy holidays to you and ur familia BENDICIONES!!

  8. Que gusto y orgullo ver a una gran mujer triunfar fuera de su país mostrando nuestras delicias culinarias. Pati me ha motivado a probar mis habilidades para cocinar. Ya veremos como sale este nuevo alumno. Felicidades y gracias Pati!

  9. That looks just sooooooo delicious so I immediately made an order for epazote and on the hunt for hoja santa leaves….I’m determined to make this…..!!! Watch your shows all the time on Create TV….

  10. Hi Pati, I happen to have the good fortune of living in Mexico City at the moment (earthquakes aside), so would you be able to give me the names of the cut of pork (costillas sin hueso?) and the beans (maya?), if you were making it here? Thank you!

  11. I just wrote you a letter and forgot to tell you that I still use cheese and eggs and some milk, lately, powered and just for coffee.

  12. Pati just started watching Create lately and have since discovered you. I love just about everything you cook, however I am trying to become a vegetarian and thinking I could substitute your meat for other ingredients, but still incorporate your wonderful spices and other ingredients. Would you be able to let me know what could be used instead? Don’t you ever change I think you’re wonderful and so full of life and have a very handsome family.

  13. Sounds delish, but can you explain what fresh “epazote” is? and “hojas santas”? I’ve heard of them, just not sure what they are and where to find them thanks!

  14. Am I correct in assuming that the best substitute for epazote for those of us living in “bolillo-land” would be cilantro?! 😉

  15. Pati, I love that you use radishes for a garnish. I really like radishes and feel they are underappreciated. Thank you!!! Love your TV show.

    1. For the epazote if you can’t find it fresh you can use dried…or you can substitute with fresh cilantro (it has a different but also great taste). For the hoja santa if you can’t find fresh leaves you can also use it dried or you can skip it.