Moles

Chicken in a Pecan and Ancho Chile Sauce

Chicken in a Pecan and Ancho Chile Sauce
Print Recipe
4.67 from 6 votes

Chicken in a Pecan and Ancho Chile Sauce

Chicken in a Pecan and Ancho Chile Sauce recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 9 "Cooking for my Crew in Sonora"
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Course: Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ancho chiles, chicken, Mexico, nuez, Pecan, Pollo, prunes, sauce
Servings: 4 to 5 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 dried ancho chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 1/2 white onion
  • 1 unpeeled garlic clove
  • 4 cups homemade chicken broth or store bought
  • 1 cup shelled pecans
  • 6 to 8 pitted prunes about 1/4 cup tightly packed
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 4- to 5- pound chicken cut up, breasts split and cut in half (10 pieces)

Instructions

  • Heat a comal or small skillet over medium heat, and toast the stemmed, seeded ancho chiles until the skin changes color and the chiles begin to release fumes, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat and add the onion and garlic clove to the comal or skillet. Toast, flipping the onion and garlic clove from side to side, until charred on the outside and softened inside, 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from the heat, set aside and when cool enough to handle, peel the garlic clove. Alternatively, char the onion and garlic under the broiler. Preheat the broiler with the rack arranged at the highest setting and cover a small sheet pan with foil. Broil the garlic for 5 to 8 minutes, turning halfway through, and the onion for 10 to 12 minutes, flipping halfway through.
  • Bring the chicken broth to a simmer in a medium saucepan. Add the pecans, prunes and toasted ancho chiles. Simmer for 10 to 12 minutes, until the chiles and prunes have rehydrated and plumped, and the pecans have softened. Set aside and let cool. Transfer to a blender, add the charred onion and garlic, and puree. If your blender is small, do this in batches.
  • Season the chicken with the salt and pepper.
  • Heat the oil in a large casserole or wide, heavy lidded skillet over medium high heat. Once hot, brown the chicken pieces, in batches, skin side down first then skin side up, until nicely colored, about 4 to 5 minutes on each side. Transfer to a bowl or plate as each batch is done.
  • Reduce heat to low, and using the lid of the casserole or pan as a shield for splatters, pour in the pureed pecan sauce. It should bubble and splutter dramatically. Stir well, scraping all the bits up from the bottom of the pan, and return the chicken pieces to the pan. Cover, turn down the heat to medium low, and simmer for 40 minutes, stirring and scraping the bottom of the pan from time to time, until the chicken is completely cooked through and the sauce is thick and delicious. Taste and adjust seasoning.

Notes

Pollo con Salsa de Nuez y Chile Ancho

Mole Verde with Pork and White Beans

Pati Jinich mole verde with pork and white beans
Print Recipe
3.2 from 5 votes

Mole Verde with Pork and White Beans

Mole Verde with Pork and White Beans recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 7 "The Art of Mole"
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 30 mins
Total Time2 hrs
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: beans, Mexican, Mole, pork, stew, tomatillos, verde
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the Pork and Beans:

  • 4 pounds country style ribs cut into 2-inch chunks, no bones
  • 1 head of garlic cut in half lengthwise
  • 1 white onion halved
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 10 black peppercorns
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 pound dry small white beans such as navy beans

For the Mole Verde:

  • 2 pounds tomatillos husked and rinsed
  • 1 to 2 serrano or jalapeño chiles stemmed
  • 3 garlic cloves
  • 1/2 cup white onion coarsely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 4 cups of pork broth reserved from cooking the pork, divided
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh epazote leaves and upper parts of stems
  • 1/2 cup coarsely chopped fresh parsley leaves and upper parts of stems
  • 3 to 4 teaspoons fresh hoja santa leaves torn into pieces, or substitute 1 teaspoon dried and crumbled, or skip
  • Chopped white onion to garnish
  • Thinly sliced radishes to garnish
  • Quartered limes to squeeze to garnish

Instructions

To cook the pork and beans:

  • Place the pork, garlic, onion, bay leaves, peppercorns and salt into a large soup pot. Cover generously with water. Set over high heat and bring to a rolling boil. Skim off any foam that forms on top, then cover, reduce heat to low and cook until meat is tender, about an hour. Take off the heat. Remove the pork chunks and place in a bowl, set aside.
  • Strain the pork cooking liquid into a large bowl. Set aside 4 cups to use for making the mole verde, and pour the rest of the liquid back into the soup pot. Set over high heat, incorporate the beans, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook for an hour or until tender. Remove from the heat and set aside.

To make the mole verde:

  • Place the tomatillos and chiles on a baking sheet and set under the broiler until they are completely charred, soft and mushy, anywhere from 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Place the roasted tomatillos and chiles along with the garlic, onion, salt and pepper in the jar of a blender. Remove and discard the stems from the whole cloves, and add the tops or “berries” (may have already been crumbled) into the jar as well. Add 1 cup of the reserved pork broth and puree until completely smooth.
  • Heat the oil in a large casserole over medium-high heat. Once hot, but not smoking, add the tomatillo puree. Cover partially with a lid and cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened considerably and has deepened in color.
  • In the jar of the blender, place the epazote, parsley and hoja santa along with remaining 3 cups of broth, and puree until completely smooth. Add to the casserole with the sauce and stir. When it comes to a simmer, add the reserved pork chunks and beans.
  • Continue cooking at a medium simmer for 25 minutes or until meat is completely coming apart and mole verde has thickened again. Serve and let people garnish as they please with onion, radishes and squeezes of lime.

Notes

Mole Verde con Puerco y Frijol Blanco

Almendrado with Chicken

Print Recipe
3 from 7 votes

Almendrado with Chicken

Almendrado with Chicken recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 7 "The Art of Mole"
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time50 mins
Total Time1 hr 5 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almonds, canela, capers, chicken, cinnamon, olives, pati's mexican table, Pickled Jalapeños, raisins
Servings: 4 to 5 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 large white onion cut into pieces
  • 6 cloves garlic unpeeled
  • 2 pounds (about 7 or 8) roma tomatoes
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 12 black peppercorns
  • 1 1-inch stick ceylon cinnamon or canela
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 3-pound chicken cut into serving pieces (wings removed for later use and breasts cut in half)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 2 cups chicken broth divided
  • 1 cup slivered almonds
  • 1/2 cup black raisins
  • 1/2 cup manzanilla olives stuffed with pimiento sliced
  • 1/4 cup capers chopped
  • 1/2 cup pickled jalapeño rajas or slices

Instructions

  • Place onion, garlic and tomatoes under the broiler, or on an already heated skillet, griddle or comal set over medium heat. Roast or char for about 10 minutes, flipping in between, until ingredients are completely charred, cooked and mushy. Set aside and peel the garlic cloves when cool enough to handle.
  • In a small skillet set over medium heat, toast the cloves, peppercorns and cinnamon stick for a couple minutes, moving and flipping them around to toast evenly. Set aside. Toast the oregano for 10 to 15 seconds and remove from the heat.
  • In the jar of a blender, place the charred onion, peeled garlic and charred tomatoes, along with the tops from the whole cloves (discard the stems), the peppercorns, cinnamon and oregano. Puree until completely smooth.
  • Heat the oil in a large casserole set over medium-high heat until very hot, but not smoking. Season the chicken with the salt and brown the chicken pieces for 2 to 3 minutes per side. You may need to do this in batches in order to not to crowd the casserole. Once you have removed all the chicken, immediately pour the tomato sauce into the hot oil and cover, as it will splatter. Reduce heat to medium.
  • Add a cup of chicken broth to the blender and puree for a few seconds to get all the remaining thick sauce out of the blender, pour into the simmering sauce and cover again. Cook for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Incorporate the remaining cup of chicken broth, almonds, raisins, olives and capers. Add the browned chicken pieces, cover and reduce heat to low and cook for 20 more minutes.
  • Remove the lid and add the pickled jalapeño slices. Increase heat to medium and cook for another 10 minutes, allowing all the flavors to blend and the sauce to thicken. Serve with rice.

Notes

Almendrado con Pollo

Caramelized Pasilla Brisket

Pati Jinich caramelized pasilla brisket
Print Recipe
4.67 from 6 votes

Caramelized Pasilla Brisket

Caramelized Pasilla Brisket recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 10 "How I Got to Now"
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time4 hrs
Total Time4 hrs 30 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ancho chiles, beef, braised, brisket, carrots, pasilla, potatoes, stew, tomatillos
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces (about 5 to 6) dried pasilla chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 3 pounds beef brisket trimmed
  • 2 teaspoons kosher or coarse sea salt divided
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 1/2 pounds tomatillos husked, rinsed, quartered
  • 1 large white onion cut into chunks
  • 10 garlic cloves peeled
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 4 ounces (or 1/2 cup) grated piloncillo or brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 pounds baby potatoes halved
  • 1 1/2 pounds carrots peeled and cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces
  • Greens of your choice for salad
  • Freshly squeezed lime juice and olive oil to dress the salad

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 350°F.
  • Heat up a comal or skillet over medium heat, then toast the pasilla chiles for about 1 to 2 minutes, flipping with tongs as they toast. Remove from heat and place in a bowl.
  • Season the meat with 1 teaspoon salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Heat oil in a large casserole or roasting pan set over high heat. Brown the meat for about 2 to 3 minutes per side. Add the toasted pasilla chiles, tomatillos, onion, garlic, chicken broth, piloncillo, the remaining teaspoon salt, and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Make sure chiles are covered with the broth.
  • Cover and seal tight with a lid or aluminum foil. Place in the oven and braise for 3 to 3-and-a-half hours, or until meat is tender. Remove from the oven. Remove the meat and place on a chopping board.
  • In a pot with salted boiling water, cook the potatoes and the carrots for 15 to 20 minutes, until tender. Drain and reserve.
  • Pour all the remaining contents of the roasting pan into the jar of a blender and puree until completely smooth. Pour the sauce back into roasting pan.
  • Slice the meat against the grain into about 1/2 to 3/4-inch slices and return it to the roasting pan. Add the potatoes and carrots, cover everything with the sauce. Cover the dish and return to oven for another 30 minutes. Remove the lid or aluminum foil, return to the oven and cook uncovered for another 30 minutes.
  • Toss the greens of your choice with lime juice and olive oil to taste. Serve the brisket with the side salad.

Notes

Falda Caramelizada con Chiles Pasilla

Coloradito Chicken and a New Season

Oaxaca is a place I have been to countless times, but always leave wanting to go back.  No wonder I was eager to bring the crew, so they could experience all that I kept telling them about. And mostly, so they could help me capture it to bring to you.

My series director, Dan, must have been dizzy from me telling him how things are “different” in Oaxaca so many times. There is something in the air, and there is something in the way the light hits Oaxaca. It makes everything you think is familiar gain a completely different dimension. Maybe that is why Oaxaca is one of Mexico’s main cradles of art.

The blue in the sky seems a deeper shade of blue. The green in the plants, mountains and herbs looks more intense and has more saturated hues of green. When you wake up in the morning and open a window, the air smells fresher and feels more crisp. The sun shines brighter. And the word “diverse” has never had a better match.

Oaxaca is one of the – or the – most ethnically and culturally diverse places in all of Mexico. It has eight defined and distinctively different regions and 18 ethnic communities – each with their own culture, cuisine, language and pre-Hispanic forms of self governance and organization for life and society.

To put it simply, as my dad would say, Oaxaca is another world.

One of the common sayings related to Oaxaca is “the land of 7 moles.” But, the irony is that there are many more moles than that. There are dozens and dozens of them. Each mole has so many different versions, depending on the cook, the family or the town.

Here, I am sharing a Coloradito Mole with Chicken. I tested it many times at home to get the exact taste I experienced in the city of Oaxaca. So many times that Sami, my middle son, would joke “coloradito, mami, coloradito?” every time he walked in the kitchen and saw a large pot simmering.

Silky, delightfully sweet, savory, tangy, and with a light spice, it is a small window into the beautiful complex layers that Oaxaca has all around.

Try it at home and join me for the new season that is about to premiere! Check your local listings here.

pati jinich coloradito chicken
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Coloradito Chicken

Here I am sharing a Coloradito Mole with Chicken. I tested it many times at home to get the exact taste I experienced in the city of Oaxaca. Silky, delightfully sweet, savory, tangy, and with a light spice, it is a small window into the beautiful complex layers that Oaxaca has all around.
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Ancho, chayote, chicken, Chiles, Coloradito, green beans, Guajillo, Mole, Oaxaca, Pollo, Tomato
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe plantain
  • 6 ancho chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 5 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 1 pound (or 3 to 4) ripe Roma tomatoes
  • 5 cloves garlic unpeeled
  • 1 1/2-inch thick slice of white onion
  • 1 1-inch-long stick ceylon cinnamon or canela (or 1/2 teaspoon ground ceylon cinnamon)
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 6 black peppercorns
  • 1/4 cup slivered almonds
  • 3 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons raisins
  • 1 tablespoon grated piloncillo or dark brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons kosher or coarse sea salt divided
  • 1 3-pound chicken cut into 8 serving pieces (wings removed for later use and breasts cut in half)
  • Vegetable oil for cooking the chicken
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 3-ounce bar of Mexican chocolate broken into pieces
  • 1 pound chayote squash peeled and sliced into 1-inch strips
  • 1 pound green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • Tortillas or rice to serve

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 400°F. Place the plantain in a baking dish lined with aluminum foil and make a couple of 1/2-inch slits on its skin. Bake until completely cooked through, about 40 minutes. Remove from the oven, when cool enough to handle, peel and slice. Set aside.
  • Heat a comal, griddle or skillet over medium heat. Once hot, toast the ancho and guajillo chiles for about 30 to 45 seconds per side, until fragrant and lightly toasted. Place chiles in a saucepan along with the whole tomatoes, cover with water and set over medium-high heat. Simmer for 12 to 15 minutes, until the chiles are rehydrated and plumped up, and the tomatoes are cooked and mushy.
  • On the same comal, griddle or skillet, char the unpeeled garlic cloves and the onion slice, until completely charred and softened, about 8 to 10 minutes, flipping a couple of times in between. Set aside to cool. Peel the garlic when cool enough to handle.
  • On a small skillet set over medium heat, toast the cinnamon stick for a minute or two until fragrant, flipping once. Next, toast the cloves and peppercorns for a minute, moving them around the entire time. Toast the almonds for a couple of minutes, until lightly browned, as well as sesame seeds. Lastly, toast the oregano for 5 to 10 seconds.
  • As each ingredient is finished being toasted, place it in the jar of the blender: the cinnamon, garlic, onion, cloves, peppercorns, almonds, sesame seeds, and oregano. Add the rehydrated chiles, cooked tomatoes and 1 cup of their cooking broth, and the plantain to the blender, as well. Incorporate the raisins, sugar and 1 teaspoon salt, and puree at least for a couple minutes until completely smooth. If your blender is on the smaller side, puree it in batches.
  • Set a large casserole over medium-high heat and heat enough oil to have about 1/8-inch of depth. Season the chicken with the remaining teaspoon of salt. Once the oil is hot, brown the chicken pieces in batches, making sure to not crowd the casserole. Cook until they have created a crust on the skin and are easy to flip, about 3 minutes per side. Place the finished pieces in a large bowl.
  • Once you are done browning the chicken, reduce the heat to medium-low. Carefully, and using the casserole’s lid as a shield (there will be splatters), pour the mole sauce into the oil. Stir and cover with the lid, leaving it slightly open, and cook for about 6-7 minutes, stirring occasionally (still protecting yourself with the lid), until the sauce is very thick and seasoned. Add the chicken broth, chocolate pieces, and the browned chicken pieces, and cook for another 20 minutes. Add the chayote squash and green beans, give it a good stir, and cook until vegetables are cooked yet tender, another 10 minutes.
  • Serve with tortillas and/or rice.

Notes

Mole Coloradito con Pollo

Coloradito Chicken

pati jinich coloradito chicken
Print Recipe
4.43 from 7 votes

Coloradito Chicken

Coloradito Chicken recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 6 “Women of Oaxaca”
Prep Time50 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time1 hr 35 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almonds, ancho chiles, canela, chayote, chicken, Chocolate, guajillo chiles, mexican chocolate, Mole, pati's mexican table, piloncillo, Plantains, raisins, sesame seeds
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe plantain
  • 6 ancho chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 5 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 1 pound (or 3 to 4) ripe Roma tomatoes
  • 5 cloves garlic unpeeled
  • 1 1/2-inch thick slice of white onion
  • 1 1-inch-long stick ceylon cinnamon or canela (or 1/2 teaspoon ground ceylon cinnamon)
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 6 black peppercorns
  • 1/4 cup slivered almonds
  • 3 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 tablespoons raisins
  • 1 tablespoon grated piloncillo or dark brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons kosher or coarse sea salt divided
  • 1 3-pound chicken cut into 8 serving pieces (wings removed for later use and breasts cut in half)
  • Vegetable oil for cooking the chicken
  • 2 cups chicken broth
  • 1 3-ounce bar of Mexican chocolate broken into pieces
  • 1 pound chayote squash peeled and sliced into 1-inch strips
  • 1 pound green beans trimmed and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • Tortillas or rice to serve

Instructions

  • Pre-heat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Place the plantain in a baking dish lined with aluminum foil and make a couple of 1/2-inch slits on its skin. Bake until completely cooked through, about 40 minutes. Remove from the oven, when cool enough to handle, peel and slice. Set aside.
  • Heat a comal, griddle or skillet over medium heat. Once hot, toast the ancho and guajillo chiles for about 30 to 45 seconds per side, until fragrant and lightly toasted. Place chiles in a saucepan along with the whole tomatoes, cover with water and set over medium-high heat. Simmer for 12 to 15 minutes, until the chiles are rehydrated and plumped up, and the tomatoes are cooked and mushy.
  • On the same comal, griddle or skillet, char the unpeeled garlic cloves and the onion slice, until completely charred and softened, about 8 to 10 minutes, flipping a couple of times in between. Set aside to cool. Peel the garlic when cool enough to handle.
  • On a small skillet set over medium heat, toast the cinnamon stick for a minute or two until fragrant, flipping once. Next, toast the cloves and peppercorns for a minute, moving them around the entire time. Toast the almonds for a couple of minutes, until lightly browned, as well as sesame seeds. Lastly, toast the oregano for 5 to 10 seconds.
  • As each ingredient is finished being toasted, place it in the jar of the blender: the cinnamon, garlic, onion, cloves, peppercorns, almonds, sesame seeds, and oregano. Add the rehydrated chiles, cooked tomatoes and 1 cup of their cooking broth, and the plantain to the blender, as well. Incorporate the raisins, sugar and 1 teaspoon salt, and puree at least for a couple minutes until completely smooth. If your blender is on the smaller side, puree it in batches.
  • Set a large casserole over medium-high heat and heat enough oil to have about 1/8-inch of depth. Season the chicken with the remaining teaspoon of salt. Once the oil is hot, brown the chicken pieces in batches, making sure to not crowd the casserole. Cook until they have created a crust on the skin and are easy to flip, about 3 minutes per side. Place the finished pieces in a large bowl.
  • Once you are done browning the chicken, reduce the heat to medium-low. Carefully, and using the casserole’s lid as a shield (there will be splatters), pour the mole sauce into the oil. Stir and cover with the lid, leaving it slightly open, and cook for about 6-7 minutes, stirring occasionally (still protecting yourself with the lid), until the sauce is very thick and seasoned. Add the chicken broth, chocolate pieces, and the browned chicken pieces, and cook for another 20 minutes. Add the chayote squash and green beans, give it a good stir, and cook until vegetables are cooked yet tender, another 10 minutes.
  • Serve with tortillas and/or rice.

Notes

Mole Coloradito con Pollo

Amarillito Mole with Chicken

Print Recipe
4 from 5 votes

Amarillito Mole with Chicken

Amarillito Mole with Chicken recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 10 “Cinnamon”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ancho chiles, chicken, cinnamon, dumplings, garlic, guajillo chiles, hoja santa, masa, Mole, pati's mexican table, tomatillos, Tomatoes
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 ancho chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 2 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 1 lb, or about 8 to 10 tomatillos husked and rinsed
  • 1 Roma tomato
  • 4 garlic cloves
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1 tsp oregano
  • 2 tsp kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper ground
  • 3 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 8 chicken pieces with skin and bones
  • 1/4 cup white onion chopped
  • 5 cups chicken broth
  • 3 medium fresh hoja santa or 5 dried optional
  • Corn Masa Dumplings optional (recipe in same episode!)

Instructions

  • On an already hot comal or dry skillet set over medium heat, toast the chiles for about 10 to 15 seconds per side. They will become more pliable and release their aroma. Remove the chiles from the pan and place them in a cooking pot along with the tomatillos, tomato and garlic cloves. Cover with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, and simmer for 10 minutes, until they are soft and cooked. Transfer to a blender along with 2 whole cloves, ground cinnamon, oregano, salt and pepper. Puree until smooth and set aside.
  • In a large skillet, heat 3 tablespoons of oil over medium-high heat. Gently add the chicken pieces skin side down first, and brown on each side for 3 to 4 minutes. Incorporate the onion and cook 2 to 3 minutes, until soft and translucent. Pour the reserved pureed sauce on top, add the hojas santas if using, and cook until it has seasoned and thickened, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Add the chicken stock, bring to a simmer and keep at a steady simmer on medium heat for about 15 to 20 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low, add the masa dumplings one by one to the pan. Cook for another 12 to 15 minutes, or until the dumplings are cooked and the mole thickens enough to coat the back of a wooden spoon.

Notes

Mole Amarillito con Pollo

Hibiscus and Pecan Mole

hibiscus and pecan mole
Print Recipe
4.5 from 4 votes

Hibiscus and Pecan Mole

Hibiscus and Pecan Mole recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 9 “Xochimilco: Cooking with Flowers”
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time40 mins
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ancho chiles, chicken broth, cinnamon, corn tortillas, hibiscus, jamaica, Mole, pasilla, pati's mexican table, pecans, piloncillo, Plantains, prunes
Servings: 10 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 9 oz ancho chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 6 oz pasilla chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 6 cups boiling water
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil or shortening
  • 1 cup white onion chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves chopped
  • 2 cups dried hibiscus flowers
  • 1 cup pecans
  • 1 cup pitted prunes
  • 1 1/4 cup ripe plantain peeled and sliced
  • 3 Corn tortillas cut into squares
  • 4 cups chicken broth
  • 1 cup grated or chopped piloncillo or brown sugar
  • 1 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 5 cloves whole
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • Toasted sesame seeds to decorate

Instructions

  • Preheat a comal, cast iron pan or nonstick skillet over low-medium heat. Toast chiles gently for about 10 seconds per side, being careful not to let them burn. Place them in a mixing bowl, cover them with boiling hot water and let them soak for 20 to 30 minutes until rehydrated, place chiles and water in batches in the food processor or blender and puree until smooth.
  • In a large, extended sauté pan, add oil and set over medium-high heat until hot, 1 or 2 minutes. Add onion and sauté for 2 to 3 minutes, until the onion starts to soften. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute. Stir in the hibiscus flowers and cook for 3 to 4 minutes; until lightly crunchy.
  • Add the tortillas, let them cook for 1 minute. Stir in the pecans, and cook for 1 minute. Add the plantains and prunes, stir and let them start to cook and brown, for about 2 to 3 minutes. Each time you add a new ingredient, let it start to cook and season, before adding the next.
  • Stir in the puréed chiles along with the chicken broth.
  • Once the whole mixture starts simmering, add the piloncillo, cinnamon, cloves and salt. Lower the heat to medium-low and continue to cook for 20 to 25 minutes. In batches, purée the mixture in the blender or food processor until smooth. Serve over the cooked meat, poultry or seafood of your choice.

Notes

Mole de flor de jamaica y nuez, Adapted from Patricia Quintana

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole

You can do fabulous things with pumpkins aside from spooky faces and pumpkin pie… Just ask any Mexican. We have a way with pumpkins.

Native to Mexico, pumpkins have been devoured there for centuries, in their entirety. The seeds are addicting as snacks, used as a hefty base for salsas, soups and sauces and more recently sprinkled on top of many dishes. The pumpkin meat is used for soups and stews, and along with the entire rind cooked in a piloncillo syrup, becoming a traditional favorite known as Tacha.

Yet there is something else you can make with those fall pumpkins: Mole!

An easy to make, silky textured and exquisite tasting mole sauce, that can bathe anything you can think of. From chicken to meat, fish, seafood and veggies; it all goes beautifully swaddled in it. I like it mostly with chicken or turkey, which is how I am most used to eating thick and rich Mole sauces….

So that you can try it too, here it goes.

As simple as it is to make, it uses two ancient and crucial techniques of Mexican cooking that enhance the flavors of the ingredients and bring a ton of personality to a dish: charring and toasting.

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 1

First the onion and garlic take a quick turn under the broiler to be charred. Their sharp, crisp and pungent flavors become transformed…

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 2

…as if their alter ego came out to show depth and sweetness. While at the same time becoming a bit rustic.

Then the ancho chiles, almonds, cinnamon, allspice and whole cloves take a turn either in a skillet or comal, to lightly toast.

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 3

Toasting them intensifies and deepens their flavor, it releases new aromas and adds a kind of warmth to the dish.

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 4

As the chiles have been dried for a long time, aside from giving them a light toast, you need to rehydrate them and plump them back to life. And it takes just 10 minutes of soaking them in a hot bath.

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 5

Then you also use that water from the chile bath, as it has some of the intense flavors and colors of the chiles, as well as the chiles to make the Mole Sauce.

Then everything in the blender goes!

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 6

If you used True or Ceylon cinnamon, puree it along with the rest of the ingredients. As it is light and thin, it crumbles and purees easily. It is gentle and kind to the blades of the blender. If you only found the hard Cassia kind, use it to simmer in the mole sauce further on.

Then you add it all along with the pumpkin puree in a big pot. You can use already made pumpkin puree from the store…

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 7

Or make your own pumpkin puree with those extra pumpkins that are sitting on your front porch… Making the puree is pretty simple: Quarter the pumpkin, remove the seeds and fibers, roast in the oven at 400 ºF until soft and process the pumpkin meat in a blender of food processor until smooth.

After you simmer the pumpkin puree along with the ancho chile puree (that has the charred and toasted ingredients), it will look like this. Incredibly rich, just like its flavor.

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 8

You can make the Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole ahead of time, and just heat it when you are ready to serve it.

Topping it with toasted pumpkin seeds makes the dish all the more fabulous.  You can taste it already, right?

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole 9

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole main
Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

Pumpkin and Ancho Chile Mole

An easy to make, silky textured and exquisite tasting mole sauce, that can bathe anything you can think of. From chicken to meat, fish, seafood and veggies; it all goes beautifully swaddled in it. I like it mostly with chicken or turkey, which is how I am most used to eating thick and rich Mole sauces….So that you can try it too, here it goes.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almonds, ancho chiles, brown sugar, ceylon, chicken, cinnamon, cloves, Mole, pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, Recipe
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 white onion peeled, charred or broiled
  • 6 garlic cloves charred or broiled, peeled
  • 3 ancho chiles stemmed, seeded and opened
  • 1/4 cup slivered almonds
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1/2 stick true or ceylon cinnamon about 1 inch (or substitute for 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon)
  • 8 whole allspice berries or 1/8 teaspoon ground
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 15-ounce can pumpkin puree about 1 3/4 cup
  • 3 cups chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or more to taste
  • 3 tablespoons brown sugar or more to taste
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds lightly toasted

Instructions

  • Place the onion and garlic in a baking sheet under the broiler. Char for 9 to 10 minutes, flipping once in between. Once they are soft and charred, remove from the heat. When the garlic is cool, peel.
  • In an already hot skillet or comal set over medium-low heat, toast the ancho chiles for about 15 to 20 seconds per side, until they brown and crisp without burning. Place toasted ancho chiles in a bowl covered with boiling water. Soak for 10 to 15 minutes until they are plumped up and rehydrated.
  • In the same skillet or comal, toast the cloves and all spice until aromatic, about a minute. Remove from the heat. Toast the almonds and cinnamon, stirring often, until lightly browned, 4 to 5 minutes.
  • Place the onion, garlic, chiles, 1/2 cup of chile soaking liquid, almonds, cloves, cinnamon and allspice in the blender and puree until smooth.
  • In a soup pot or casserole, heat the oil and pour the pureed mixture over medium heat. Add the salt and sugar. Cook for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently to help prevent the sauce from sticking to the bottom of the pan. The color will darken considerably.
  • Add the pumpkin puree and chicken broth to the sauce. Stir well until the pumpkin puree has dissolved, it will have a silky consistency. Continue to cook for about 12 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  • Use the mole sauce to pour over grilled, broiled or boiled chicken, meat or fish. Sprinkle with toasted pumpkin seeds for some added flavor and crunch.

Notes

Mole de Chile Ancho y Calabaza

Mole Poblano: Yes You Can!

The showcase of last week’s class was one of Mexico’s most famous and delicious moles, the Poblano, which originated in the kitchen of the Convent of Santa Rosa, in Puebla. After seeing how much guests enjoyed it, I can’t wait to share it with you.

I know, the word Mole sounds exciting to eat yet intimidating to prepare. As the root of the word describes, from the náhuatl mulli, Mole is a thick sauce or paste made by grinding ingredients together in a molcajete or communal mill. A food processor works as well. This sauce can be thinned out with broth or water when ready to use.

The Poblano with its long ingredients list and its laborious process, is not the best way to introduce Moles. There are some simple Moles with no more than 4 or 5 ingredients that are easier to prepare and just as tasty.

But here I am! I adore the Poblano and I know you will too…

I tested many ways to find the easiest route to make it without compromising its authenticity and flavor. As long as you prep your ingredients and have them in place before you start throwing them in the pot -what the French call Mise en Place and Mexicans Estate Listo!-, it’s a manageable task that takes about an hour. Trust me. Here we go.

As I list the ingredients, we’ll go through some Mole basics…

Four chiles are typically used: The reddish Ancho (6 o’clock) with bittersweet and fruity flavors; the black Mulato (12 o’clock) with much sweeter, chocolaty and fuller tones; the raisin colored Pasilla (3 o’clock) with a deep, strong and bitter bite; and the tobacco looking Chipotle (9 o’clock) smoky, rich and spicy.

Mole Poblano 1

To be worthy of the name Mole, its not enough to be a sauce. You need chiles in there, but adding a Jalapeño doesn’t make it a Mole. Some chiles work together and some don’t. Some work for certain kinds of moles and some don’t. This group of four, is like the Fantastic Four.

The Mole Poblano has the deep clean flavors from the white onion, a judicious use of the pungent garlic, the refreshing punch from the tomato and the tartness of the tomatillo.

Mole Poblano 2

Moles show a deep intermarriage between the native Mexican cuisine and that brought from Spain. Three centuries of Colonial life deeply influenced our food. That’s the case of the onion, garlic and many of the nuts, fruits and spices added below.

Native peanuts and pumpkin seeds which are present as a thickener and flavoring element in many Mexican dishes, add some Mediterranean almonds, a bunch of sweet raisins…

Mole Poblano 3

Chile seeds tend to be discarded in many Mexican dishes, but not in this Baroque concoction from the late 1600s. Seeds do store most of the heat from chiles but also a ton of their flavor.

They are beautiful too, especially in my grandmother’s bowl which photographs so nicely…

Mole Poblano 4

Other seeds and spices included take a ride through Mexico’s history: Sesame seeds brought by African slaves; anise seeds, cloves, cinnamon and black peppercorns from the Orient routes; allspice from the Caribbean; coriander, thyme and marjoram from the Mediterranean…

Mole Poblano 5

To thicken the Mole and to add an earthy base with a small town flavor, corn tortillas are used. As well as Mexican style bread -bolillos or teleras which are the Mexican adaptation of the French baguette from the times of Maximilian.

Mole Poblano 6

To top the balancing act of this dish, and also because it was created by Sor Andrea de la Asunción, a nun with an incredible sweet tooth, Mexican chocolate is added. Made with toasted cacao, cinnamon, sugar and typically ground almonds, it is sweeter and grainier than regular bittersweet chocolate.

Not that much chocolate is added though, so the idea that the Mole Poblano is a chocolate sauce is a bit exaggerated…

Mole Pobalno 7

Now that we ran through the ingredients, let’s cook it. As we do, you will see that another Mole quality is that ingredients are transformed, and their qualities brought out, before they are pureed together. That helps achieve such a smooth layering of complex flavors.

First add lard, vegetable shortening or oil in your pot. Once hot, saute the chiles until crunchy and browned. Remove with a slotted spoon and place in a bowl. They will look something like this…

Mole Poblano 8

In that same pot add the onions and garlic and cook until softened, for about 2 to 3 minutes. 

Mole Poblano 9

Make some room and toss in the almonds, peanuts, raisins and pumpkin seeds, cook for another 2 to 3 minutes more…

Some versions of this mole ask that ingredients be charred, broiled, toasted, sauteed, ground one by one, even with different pots and pans. But you can use the same pot as long as it is heavy, large and extended and as long as you give the ingredients enough time before adding the next batch…

So, make some room again to throw in those beautiful reserved chile seeds… AND…

Mole Poblano 10
…sesame seeds,stemmed cloves, anise seeds, coriander seeds, black peppercorns, cinnamon stick, ground allspice, thyme and marjoram. Let it all cook for 4 to 5 minutes.

Make some room again, and add the already charred or broiled tomatoes and tomatillos, the sliced tortillas and bread…

Mole Poblano 11

As you add each additional batch of ingredients, give them time to season and brown together. Don’t let any of them burn though…

Go ahead and add the chiles that you already browned, and mix it all up.

Mole Poblano 12

Pour in some rich tasting chicken broth. 

Mole Poblano 13

Once it starts to simmer, drop in the chocolate pieces and stir until they dissolve.

Look at the gorgeous looking mess that we have here below!!!

Mole Poblano 14

Let it all simmer for about 15 minutes. You have quite a diverse group of ingredients in there, so they need a bit of time to get acquainted with each other…

Mole Poblano 15

Turn off the heat and let the mixture stand, so it can make sense of what it will become.

Then, puree in a food processor or blender. Or why not, if you feel like it, take out that molcajete.

Finally, thank Sor Andrea for what you are about to see!!! The tastiest, yummiest…

Mole Poblano 16

Let’s just say: one of my favorite Moles.

Of the many things you can make with this mole such as enchiladas, enmoladas, empanadas, eggs, nopales or potatoes.. there’s of course the traditional: poured over simply boiled chicken or turkey and covered with lightly toasted sesame seeds.

Mole Poblano 17

You can see why I took longer to post this time: I was too busy adding ingredients to the basics section of my blog, just for this recipe!

mole poblano
Print Recipe
3.84 from 6 votes

Mole Poblano

The showcase of last week’s class was one of Mexico’s most famous and delicious moles, the Poblano, which originated in the kitchen of the Convent of Santa Rosa, in Puebla. After seeing how much guests enjoyed it, I can’t wait to share it with you. I know, the word Mole sounds exciting to eat yet intimidating to prepare.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Course: Main Course, Sauce
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almonds, ancho chiles, bread, ceylon, Chipotle, cinnamon, corn tortillas, mexican chocolate, Mole, mulato chiles, pasilla, Peanuts, pumpkin seeds, raisins, tomatillos
Servings: 24 to 25 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup lard vegetable shortening or vegetable oil
  • 3 ounces chiles anchos about 6 or 7, stemmed and seeded
  • 3 ounces chiles pasillas about 12 or 13, stemmed and seeded
  • 3 ounces chiles mulatos about 6, stemmed and seeded
  • 1/3 ounces dried chipotle chiles about 4, stemmed and seeded
  • 1/2 white onion about 1/2 pound, roughly chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves peeled and roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons raw almonds with skin
  • 3 tablespoons raw shelled peanuts
  • 3 tablespoons raisins
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds
  • 4 tablespoons sesame seeds
  • 1/2 cup reserved chile seeds
  • 5 whole cloves stemmed
  • 1/4 teaspoon anise seeds
  • 1/4 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 1 stick true or ceylon cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/8 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • 1/2 pound roma tomatoes about 2 , charred or roaste
  • 1/3 pound tomatillos about 2, husked, rinsed, charred/roasted
  • 2 corn tortillas sliced into 8 pieces
  • 1/2 bolillo telera or baguette, about 2 ounces, thickly sliced (if it is a couple days old, better)
  • 6 ounces Mexican style chocolate or bittersweet chocolate
  • 5 cups chicken broth plus 4 more to dilute later on
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or more to taste
  • 1/2 cup sesame seeds toasted, to sprinkle at the end

Instructions

  • In a large extended casserole dish set over medium high heat, add 1/2 cup lard, oil, or vegetable shortening. Once hot, about 2 minutes later, add the chiles in 2 or 3 batches and saute, stirring often, and being careful not to let them completely burn. Remove with a slotted spoon and place in a mixing bowl as you move along.
  • In the same oil, add chopped onion and garlic and saute for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring, until they soften and release their aroma. Stir in the almonds, peanuts, raisins and pumpkin seeds, and let them cook for 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Stir in the sesame seeds, reserved chile seeds, stemmed cloves, anise seeds, coriander seeds, black peppercorns, cinnamon stick, ground allspice, thyme and marjoram. Stir frequently and let it all cook for 3 to 4 more minutes, stirring often. Make room again, and add the tortilla and bread pieces along with the tomatoes and tomatillos. Let it all cook for a couple minutes.
  • Incorporate the already sauteed chiles and pour in the chicken broth. Stir and once it comes to a simmer, add the chocolate pieces and the salt. Mix well, and let it simmer for 12 to 15 minutes. Turn off the heat, cover and let the mix rest for 1/2 hour, so the chiles can completely soften.
  • In batches, puree the mixture in the blender or food processor until smooth. You can store this mole, covered, in the refrigerator for up to a month, or freeze it for up to a year.
  • When ready to eat, dilute a cup of mole with 1/2 cup chicken broth in a saucepan and simmer for 2 to 3 minutes. Serve over cooked chicken or turkey and sprinkle with toasted sesame seeds on top.

Notes

Adapted from Sor Andrea de la Asunción from the Santa Rosa Convent


Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Call to undefined function pati_paging_nav() in /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-content/themes/pati_new/archive.php:38 Stack trace: #0 /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-includes/template-loader.php(106): include() #1 /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-blog-header.php(19): require_once('/home/patijinic...') #2 /home/patijinich/public_html/index.php(17): require('/home/patijinic...') #3 {main} thrown in /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-content/themes/pati_new/archive.php on line 38