Cheese & Dairy

Asparagus Mushroom & Goat Cheese Enchiladas with Pine Nut Mole Sauce

Print Recipe
3.25 from 4 votes

Asparagus Mushroom & Goat Cheese Enchiladas with Pine Nut Mole Sauce

The tortillas are dipped into the luscious mole and wrapped around the filling of seared mushrooms and crisp-tender asparagus seasoned with orange zest and thyme, and goat cheese, which melts when the enchiladas are topped with the hot mole sauce. When you have vegetarians coming over for dinner, this dish is a must.
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: enchiladas, Vegetarian
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the Pine Nut Mole:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped white onion
  • 1 cup raw pine nuts
  • 1 garlic clove chopped
  • 1 pound ripe tomatoes coarsely chopped
  • 2 ancho chiles stemmed, seeded, and coarsely chopped or broken into pieces
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken broth homemade or store-bought
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon packed brown sugar or to taste

For the Filling:

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 pound white button or baby bella (cremini) mushrooms cleaned and diced
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 pound asparagus tough ends removed, peeled from just below the tips tothe bottom, and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
  • 1 tablespoon grated orange zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

To assemble:

  • 12 corn tortillas
  • 6 ounces goat cheese cut into chunks (about 3/4 cup)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped chives for garnish
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts toasted, for garnish

Instructions

To make the mole:

  • Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large casserole or heavy pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until completely softened.Stir in the pine nuts and garlic and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, until the garlic becomes fragrant and changes color and the pine nuts are light brown and smell toasty. Raise the heat to medium- high, add another tablespoon of olive oil and the tomatoes, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes soften and break down, 7 to 8 minutes. Add the ancho chiles, orange juice, broth, salt, and brown sugar and bring to a simmer.Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the chiles have rehydrated and plumped up and the sauce has thickened, about 8 minutes more.
  • Transfer the contents of the pot to a blender and let cool for a few minutes, then puree, in batches if necessary, until completely smooth.
  • Rinse out and dry the pot, add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and heat over medium heat. Add the pine nut mole, cover partially, and simmer for 5 to 6 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the sauce has darkened and thickened a bit more. Cover and set aside.

To make the filling:

  • Heat the oil in a large skillet or casserole over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and let them sear and brown, without stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes. Push the mushrooms to the sides of the pan and add the butter to the middle. When the butter begins to foam, add the asparagus, thyme, orange zest, salt, and pepper to taste, stir together with the mushrooms, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the asparagus is crisp-tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat.

To assemble:

  • Heat and lightly toast the tortillas on a hot comal or skillet.
  • Dip a tortilla in the mole, place it on a plate, and top with 2 to 3 tablespoons of the mushroom and asparagus mixture and a tablespoon of crumbled goat cheese. Roll up into a chubby enchilada and place seam side down on a serving platter. Continue with the remaining tortillas and filling.
  • Reheat the sauce if necessary. Spoon a generous amount of sauce on top of the enchiladas (use it all if you wish), garnish with the chives and toasted pine nuts, and serve.

Notes

Enchiladas de Espárragos, Cahmiñones y Queso de Cabra con Mole de Piñón

Sonora Cheese Soup

Sonora Cheese Soup
Print Recipe
3.6 from 5 votes

Sonora Cheese Soup

Sonora Cheese Soup recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 9 "Cooking for my Crew in Sonora"
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Course: Soup
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: anaheim chiles, caldo, cheese, chicken broth, Mexico, pati’s mexican table, pay de queso, poblanos, queso, queso fresco, Sonora, Sonoran, sopa, soup
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons canola or safflower oil
  • 1 to 1 1/4 pounds potatoes about 4 medium, peeled and diced (about 3 cups)
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped white onion
  • 1 ripe medium-sized tomato cored and diced without discarding seeds and juices
  • 4 fresh Anaheim or poblano chiles about 1 pound, charred or roasted, sweated, peeled, seeded and cut into strips
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 4 cups homemade chicken broth
  • 2 cups milk
  • 1/2 pound queso regional fresco de Sonora or queso fresco

Instructions

  • Heat the oil over medium heat in a large, heavy soup pot. When hot, add the potatoes and onions and cook, stirring often, until the onions are soft and translucent, about 4 to 5 minutes. Add the tomato, prepared Anaheim or poblano chiles, and salt, and cook until the ingredients are softened, 4 to 5 minutes more.
  • Add the chicken broth, bring to a simmer and cook for 10 minutes, or until the potatoes are completely tender and the broth has thickened a bit. Taste and adjust salt. Reduce the heat to medium-low, slowly add the milk and bring back to a gentle simmer. Gradually crumble the cheese into the simmering soup and stir until cheese is completely melted – or serve in bowls with cubes of the cheese in the bowls adding the soup on top. Taste again for salt and serve hot.

Notes

Caldo de Queso

Cheese Chile Relleno

cheese chile relleno recipe
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Cheese Chile Relleno

Cheese Chile Relleno recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 1 "Tucson: Gateway to Sonora"
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: anaheim chiles, cheese, chile, chiles rellenos, chili, chilli, queso, queso Oaxaca, relleno, stuffed, Vegetarian
Servings: 8 to 10 chiles rellenos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 8 to 10 fresh anaheim chiles about 3 pounds
  • 3 cups shredded queso Oaxaca or asadero, quesadilla or melty cheese of your choice
  • 1/2 cup all purpose flour
  • 4 eggs separated
  • Vegetable oil for frying

For serving:

Instructions

First, prepare the chiles for stuffing:

  • Roast or char the Anaheim chiles by either placing them on a tray under the broiler, directly on the grill, or directly over the open flame. I prefer to broil them because you can do more at one time, and it just seems faster and easier. Whatever method you choose, turn them every 2 to 3 minutes for a total of 6 to 9 minutes. They must seem charred and blistered on the outside, and the flesh must be cooked but not burnt.
  • Once charred and hot, place the chiles in a plastic bag, close it tightly, and let them sweat for at least 10 minutes. Lastly, under a thin stream of cold water, or using a bowl of water, remove the charred skin, which should come right off. Make a slit down one side of the chile and remove the cluster of seeds and veins.

Second, stuff your chiles:

  • Stuff each chile with about 1/3 cup cheese or as much as will fit allowing them to close. You may seal with a toothpick.
  • Place 1/2 cup all purpose flour on a plate, roll the stuffed chiles in the flour, and let them sit. The flour coating will help the batter coat and stay on the chiles later on.

Third, prepare your batter:

  • In a mixer, beat the egg whites until they can hold stiff peaks. Gently, over low speed, fold in the egg yolks and only beat enough to incorporate them, a few seconds.

Fourth, batter and fry the chiles:

  • In a large casserole, heat about 1/2” depth of oil, over medium to medium-high heat. Once hot, test the oil by dipping in a piece of tortilla or bread — if there are active and happy bubbles all around it, the oil is ready. If and when oil is ready, dip each of the stuffed and floured chiles into the egg batter, making sure that they are entirely covered in batter. Gently place them in the hot oil, trying to keep the side that was open or sealed with the toothpick facing up. Spoon some of the hot oil on top, so that it will seal the chile. Make as many as will fit in the casserole without overcrowding them. Fry for about 2 minutes per side, until golden brown. Make sure you flip them gently with a slotted spoon. Once ready, place on a paper covered drying rack or platter.
  • (Note: If you are going to eat later, you may warm up the chiles in a baking dish in a 300℉ oven for 10 minutes.)
  • To make tacos, place the chiles rellenos in flour tortillas and top with shredded cabbage, colorado chile salsa, Mexican crema, and crumbled queso Cotija or queso fresco.

Notes

Chile Relleno de Queso

My Favorite Queso Fundido paired with Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila

Jaw-dropping. As soon as you set it on a table it will fly off. Guaranteed. Especially if I am around!

Queso fundido is the epitome of an antojo. What we Mexicans call a food craving that can be eaten anytime of day as a quick snack, or a full meal if eaten in a big enough amount. Antojo literally translates to craving, and I don’t know a single Mexican that doesn’t drool over the thought of a queso fundido.

Queso fundido is not a cheese dip. Queso fundido is not a cheese sauce. Queso fundido is the real deal. It is real cheese. Tons of it. You throw a combination of deliciously flavorful melty cheeses onto a baking dish or a traditional earthenware cazuela. Then place it on a heat source — it can be on a burner, in the oven, under the broiler — until the cheese not only melts, but becomes super bubbly on top and starts making a crust all around the edges.

Wait. Then come the toppings. The most typical and popular toppings in restaurants in Mexico City, where I grew up, are poblano rajas, chorizo and mushrooms. They are separate offerings, so you choose if you want your queso with chorizo or with rajas or mushrooms. Different restaurants have their variations, for example, it can be rajas with caramelized onions, different kinds of chorizo, cultivated or wild mushrooms cooked with epazote or dried chiles, to name some.

When I make queso at home, I like to make a combo of my favorite toppings. No one can stop me and no one should stop you! My take combines caramelized onions and poblano chiles, throws in a bit of seeded and diced tomato for an added juicy bite and tons of crisp chunks of flavorful chorizo.

Most people I know like their queso fundido on flour tortillas. But it is you and your guests’ choice if they want corn tortillas, too. If you have some some salsas and guacamole, place them on the table for optional add ons.

Whichever way, have your Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila out to chase your queso fundido tacos and to wash down that queso fundido. I like to serve it neat or on the rocks as it has such a smooth taste.

Once everything is on the table, all bets are off. Run for it, if you want a chance to make a queso fundido taco before it disappears.

Poblano Rajas Chorizo Queso Fundido

poblano rajas chorizo queso fundido
Print Recipe
3.58 from 7 votes

Poblano Rajas and Chorizo Queso Fundido

The popular Mexican antojo, or craving, Queso Fundido topped with chorizo, onion, poblano rajas, and tomato. 
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time35 mins
Total Time50 mins
Course: Appetizer, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Chorizo, Queso Fundido
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil plus more to grease the baking dish
  • 1/3 pound Mexican chorizo casings removed, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1/4 white onion halved and thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 1 poblano chile roasted, sweated, peeled, cut into strips
  • 1 ripe Roma tomato cored, seeded, cut into small dice
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1 pound (or 4 cups) combination of shredded Mexican-style melty cheeses such as Asadero, quesadilla and Oaxaca (can sub with mozzarella, Muenster and Monterey Jack)
  • 8 to 10 flour or corn tortillas
  • 1 ripe avocado sliced
  • Serve with salsa of your choice optional
  • Pair with Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila neat or on the rocks

Instructions

  • Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the chorizo, cook for 4 to 5 minutes, breaking it into smaller pieces with a couple of spatulas or wooden spoons until crisp and brown. Remove from the heat and scrape into a bowl.
  • Set a rack on upper third tier of the oven and preheat to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Return the skillet to medium heat, add the butter and once it melts, add the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally and scraping the bottom of the pan, for 6 to 7 minutes, until they have wilted and begun to brown around the edges. Add the poblano pepper strips, tomato, and salt, and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and transfer to a bowl.
  • Place shredded cheese in a gently oiled shallow baking dish that can comfortably hold it. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until completely melted. Remove from the oven. Top with the crispy chorizo and poblano rajas mixture. Place back in the oven and bake for another 7 to 8 minutes, until cheese is oozing and browned along the edges and part of the top.
  • Meanwhile, preheat a comal or large skillet over medium-low heat. Heat the tortillas, making sure they are not on top of each other, until completely warmed, puffed and slightly browned. Place in a tortilla warmer or wrap in a clean cloth or kitchen towel.
  • Remove the queso from the oven and place on the table along with the warm tortillas, ripe avocado slices, and salsa of choice, if desired. Let everyone assemble their tacos!

Notes

Queso Fundido

Jalapeño Garlic Cheesy Bread

Jalapeño and Garlic Cheesy Bread
Print Recipe
4.25 from 4 votes

Jalapeño Garlic Cheesy Bread

Jalapeño Garlic Cheesy Bread from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 6 "Loreto: Baja’s Hidden Gem"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: garlic bread, jalapeno, pati's mexican table
Servings: 4 to 5 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 baguette
  • 4 tablespoons butter softened
  • 1 jalapeño seeded and minced
  • 2 cloves garlic minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup crumbled cojita cheese
  • 1 cup Oaxaca cheese shredded
  • 1 cup muenster cheese shredded

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil.
  • Cut slits three-quarters of the way through a baguette about 1-inch apart, making sure not to cut all the way through the baguette.
  • In a bowl, mix together the butter, jalapeno, garlic and salt. In a separate bowl, mix together the cheeses. Spread a little of the butter mixture into each of the slits, and press the cheese mixture into the slits, using all the cheese and butter and filling all the slits.
  • Put the baguette onto the baking sheet lined with foil and place in the oven. Bake for 10 to 15 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbling and the baguette is golden brown.

Notes

Pan de Ajo con Jalapeños y Queso

Story Goes… Governor Shrimp Tacos

The story goes, governor shrimp tacos, or tacos gobernador de camarón, were created in the state of Sinaloa in the early 1990s to surprise governor Francisco Labastida Ochoa, after he told a few friends how much he loved his wife’s shrimp tacos. That bit of information was passed on to the owners of Los Arcos in Mazatlán restaurant, before he headed there to visit.

The chef was given the quest not only try to match the governor’s wife’s tacos, which no one besides the governor had tried, but to beat them. So quite a few taco recipes were developed and tested. When the governor showed up to eat, he liked them so much he named them “tacos gobernador.”

Now, I do not know if that story is entirely true. But, what I do know is, these tacos became so popular you no longer only find them at Los Arcos in Mazatlán. They are all over Sinaloa and beyond. I had them as far away as Los Angeles and Miami.  Yet, I saw the most renditions on the 800 mile drive throughout the entire Baja Peninsula.

I felt more than obliged to offer my take on tacos gobernador, since my travels in Baja are featured on “Pati’s Mexican Table” in my new season premiering in a few weeks (you can watch the trailer here). And I am thrilled to share my recipe with you, as we all love these tacos in my home!

So what’s in tacos gobernador? First, a combination of shrimp and cheese makes them a cross between a taco and a quesadilla. A ton of cheese is really essential.

Second, cooked onion that is often accompanied by other vegetables, typically bell peppers and sometimes poblano chiles. If you ask me what I prefer, hands down, not even a second of hesitation, poblano chiles. I absolutely adore them. I feel lukewarm about green bell peppers to put it mildly. So my take has a combination of slivered onions and poblanos with just a bit of tomato.

Third, the seasonings. Some renditions have no sauce, only salt and pepper. Some have a simple to a more seasoned tomato sauce. I go for a seasoned, very thick sauce that is almost a paste, really. It combines tomato paste, La Costeña chipotles in adobo and the W sauce — Worcestershire — or as we call it in Mexico “salsa inglesa.”

Lastly, you can opt for corn or flour tortillas. There are no strict guidelines here, different from other kinds of tacos.

There are so many reasons why I like these tacos so much. They end up being a complete meal, they are so easy to prepare, they are irresistibly delicious and messy, the cheese creates an inviting crust as it melts… and they have a great story behind them. I do love a good story.

Governor Shrimp Tacos
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Governor Shrimp Tacos

Governor Shrimp Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 1 "Tijuana’s Culinary Revolution" 
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Mexican, pati’s mexican table, Shrimp, Sinaloa, Taco
Servings: 6 Tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 white onion slivered
  • 2 poblano chiles stemmed, seeded, slivered
  • 5 garlic cloves finely chopped
  • 2 ripe Roma tomatoes cored, seeded, slivered
  • 3 tablespoons sauce from chipotles in adobo
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
  • 1 1/2 pounds (about 11-15) shelled large shrimp cut into large chunks
  • 3 cups shredded Oaxaca, mozzarella, asadero or Muenster cheese
  • 6 to 8 flour or corn tortillas
  • Sliced avocado for garnish
  • 1 Chile Manzano sliced and mixed with the juice of a lime, 1/4 red onion and salt to taste

Instructions

  • Heat the butter in a large nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat. Once it melts and begins to bubble, add the onion and poblano and cook until wilted, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, stir, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Incorporate the tomatoes, cook for a minute, and as they begin to soften, add the sauce from the chipotles in adobo, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Stir well, cook for another minute, then add the shrimp and cook just until they change color, about 1 to 2 minutes. Turn off heat and scrape into a bowl to prevent the shrimp from overcooking.
  • On a preheated comal set over low heat, heat the tortillas on both sides for a minute. Add about 1/2 cup of shredded cheese onto each one. Once the cheese begins to melt, add a generous amount of the shrimp mixture, fold in half and continue heating until cheese has completely melted and the tortillas have begun to lightly brown and create a crust.
  • Serve with sliced avocado and Manzano chiles and onion.

Video

Notes

Tacos Gobernador de Camarón

Cotija Cheese

Cotija cheese is a salty, slightly acidic, cow’s milk cheese with a strong personality. Named after the city of Cotija in the state of Michoacán, it has been produced in the region for over 400 years. Traditionally, after the dairy cows grazed in the mountain pastures throughout Jalisco and Michoacán during the rainy season, the cheesemakers would bring down their cheese to be aged in Cotija for at least two months.

Cotija is a hard, dry, aged, and mature pressed cheese with a grainy texture that crumbles easily. It has a high salt content, so it isn’t really a cheese you want to take a big bite out of or have on a cheese platter. But it is perfect for adding a tangy and salty finish to a dish, be it savory or sweet. Grate some Cotija over tacos, enchiladas, corn, salads, and more to add lots of savory flavor.

Even though the real Cotija cheese has a collective brand recognition, Cotija producers haven’t been able to have it get the desired and prestigious denomination of origin. Although it is very prided locally, it is also known all over Mexico and increasingly abroad. Its availability in the US is pretty recent, maybe not even a decade.

You can usually find Cotija as a square or round block, cut into pieces, or already grated or crumbled at your local market, like in the photo above. You can think of Cotija as a Mexican version of parmesan.

Chipotle Goat Cheese Spread

Pati Jinich chipotle goat cheese spread
Print Recipe
4.43 from 7 votes

Chipotle Goat Cheese Spread

Chipotle Goat Cheese Spread recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 13 "More Than Just a Meal" 
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chipotles in adobo, goat cheese, pati's mexican table, sundried tomatoes, walnuts
Servings: 1 generous cup
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/3 cup white onion thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup walnuts
  • 2 tablespoons sundried tomatoes packed in oil coarsely chopped
  • 6 ounces goat cheese
  • 2 tablespoons chipotle chiles in adobo chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

Instructions

  • In a small skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Once hot, add the onion, reduce heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until completely softened and caramelized, about 5 to 7 minutes. Scrape the onions into the bowl of a food processor.
  • Place the skillet back over low heat, add the walnuts and let them toast, stirring occasionally, for 3 minutes. Add the walnuts to the food processor along with the chipotle chiles, sundried tomatoes, goat cheese, salt, and freshly ground black pepper to taste. Process until smooth. Use immediately or store covered in the refrigerator.

Notes

Dip de Queso de Cabra con Chipotle

Blackberry Cheesecake

During the summer months, which is the rainy season, gigantic blackberries take over the culinary stage in the town of Valle de Bravo, Mexico. They can be the size of a plum, bursting with wine colored juice that is at once sweet and tart and addicting. Literally every morning, women come down from the mountains and valleys to the town’s market with buckets of these fresh picked gems. Of course, they sell out in a matter of minutes.

What to do with them? Oh first of all, eat them by the handfuls straight from the buckets. Just like that. Or puree them raw, maybe with a bit of mint and pour them over vanilla ice cream or pound cake. Or you can eat it like a cold soup! But one of my favorite things is to use them as a topping for cheesecake.

Blackberry cheesecake is definitely a thing Mexican kitchens have been doing for a while. Yes, we have chocolate cheesecake, cajeta cheesecake, strawberry cheesecake… but what is considered the traditional topping in Valle de Bravo is a kind of blackberry jam.

Here I am trying to replicate my favorite ones from Valle de Bravo, as Juju and I just went blackberry picking a few days ago.

Blackberry picking with my youngest boy, Juju… He was showing me how to do Instagram Stories as he is much more tech-savvy than me. You can view our stories on my Instagram.

There are three parts to this dessert – all super simple to make. But each one needs to be just right, so here are my notes on that.

For the crust: After the crumbled crackers are mixed with the melted butter and dash of cinnamon, they need to be applied with pressure to the bottom of the mold creating a somewhat even bottom crust with a gentle rim going up the side. And it is absolutely necessary for the crust to set and chill before the cheesecake mixture is added. If not, the crust will not stand tall underneath it, and it will lose presence.

For the filling: I like it rich and super moist. For me, that means adding sour cream, which also gives it a refreshing tang, and cottage cheese, which adds a gentle saltiness. With this kind of mixture, it is important to not over bake. As your timer kicks the 55-minute mark, stand at the ready to take it out. It should look puffed up and gently browned on top and a toothpick inserted in the middle should come out just moist, but not with any of the filling covering it.

For the topping: I like to add unflavored gelatin to help it set. This creates a defined layer that will not run all over the place. After the blackberry mixture has boiled, and it has been mashed and the gelatin added, let it cool just to room temperature and then pour onto the cheesecake and chill. You don’t want the blackberry topping to begin to set in the saucepan.

Of course you can make the cheesecake with many other toppings, but before you consider that, give this one a try.

Pati Jinich blackberry cheesecake

Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Blackberry Cheesecake

One of my favorite things to do with blackberries is to use them as a topping for cheesecake. Blackberry cheesecake is definitely a thing Mexican kitchens have been doing for a while. Yes, we have chocolate cheesecake, cajeta cheesecake, strawberry cheesecake… but what is considered the traditional topping in Valle de Bravo is a kind of blackberry jam.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: blackberry, cheesecake, graham cracker
Servings: 10 to 12 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

Crust:

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter melted
  • 1 1/2 cups crumbled graham crackers
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground true cinnamon or canela

Filling:

  • 3 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups (or 12 ounces) cottage cheese
  • 1 1/2 cups (or 12 ounces) sour cream
  • 1 1/2 cups (or 12 ounces) cream cheese
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons cornstarch
  • Pinch of kosher or coarse sea salt

Blackberry Topping:

  • 4 cups ripe blackberries
  • Juice of a lime (about 3 tablespoons)
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 envelope (about 1 tablespoon) of unflavored gelatin

Instructions

For the crust:

  • In a bowl, combine the melted butter with the graham cracker crumbs and cinnamon.
  • Scrape onto a ring mold pan. Press around with your hands or the back of a tablespoon to make the bottom crust as even as you can, and push on the sides, to give the crust a short gentle border of about 1/2-inch in height. Cover and place in the refrigerator to chill while you make the filling.
  • Preheat the oven to 350°F and set the rack in the middle.

For the filling:

  • In the jar of a blender, add the eggs, cottage cheese and sour cream. Process until smooth, Incorporate the cream cheese, sugar, vanilla extract, cornstarch and salt, and puree again until fully incorporated.
  • Remove the crust from the refrigerator, pour the mix from the blender on top, jiggle a few times for it to spread evenly. Place in the oven and bake anywhere from 55 minutes to an hour until set. A toothpick inserted in the middle should come out just moist, but not with any of the filling covering it.
  • Remove from the oven. The cheesecake will be very puffed up. As you take it out of the oven it will settle and deflate a little, and cracks may appear on its surface, which is totally normal. Set aside and let cool.

For the topping:

  • In a medium saucepan, combine the blackberries, lime juice and sugar and set over high heat. Once it comes to a full boil, stir and let it continue to cook for 2 to 3 minutes while mashing with a potato masher or mallet.
  • Remove from the heat, add the contents from one envelope of unflavored gelatin. Stir well until fully dissolved and let cool until lukewarm or at room temperature.

To assemble:

  • Pour the cooled blackberry mixture onto the cooled cheesecake. Cover with plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least a couple of hours so that the cheesecake chills and the blackberry topping sets.
  • Remove cheesecake from the refrigerator. Have a cup with lukewarm water and wet a normal dinner or butter knife. Run it around the edge of the mold all the way around and going down to the bottom. Release the mold and serve. Leftovers can be stored covered in the refrigerator.

Notes

Pay de Queso con Zarzamora

Chiles Rellenos

chile rellenos pati jinich
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Chiles Rellenos

Chiles Rellenos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 11 "Family Favorites"
Prep Time45 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time1 hr
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ancho chiles, cheese, chiles rellenos, chilis, chillis, fried, poblanos, stuffed
Servings: 6 to 8 chiles rellenos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 6 to 8 poblano chiles (about 2 pounds)
  • 1 batch red sauce or salsa roja
  • 3 to 4 cups grated melty cheese such as Oaxaca, Monterey Jack, mozzarella or Muenster
  • 4 eggs separated
  • 1/2 cup all-purpose flour
  • Vegetable oil for frying

Instructions

To prepare the poblano chiles:

  • Place chiles on a tray under the broiler, directly on the grill, or directly over the open flame. I prefer to broil them. Whatever method you choose, turn them every 2 to 3 minutes for a total of 6 to 9 minutes. They must seem charred and blistered on the outside, while the flesh must be cooked but not burnt. Place them immediately in a plastic bag, close it tightly and let them sweat for 10 to 20 minutes. Lastly, under a thin stream of cold water, remove the charred skin, which should come right off. Make a slit down one side of the pepper and remove the cluster of seeds and veins. Once cleaned, pat them dry.
  • Stuff each of the poblano chiles with about 1/2 cup grated cheese, or as much as will fit, allowing them to close. You may seal with a toothpick. Place 1/2 cup flour on a plate, roll the stuffed chiles in the flour and let them sit. The flour coating will help the batter coat and stay on the chiles.

To prepare the batter:

  • In a stand mixer, beat the egg whites until they hold stiff peaks. Gently, on low speed, fold in the egg yolks and only beat enough so that they are incorporated, a few seconds.

To cook the chiles:

  • In a large casserole, heat about 1/2-inch of oil over medium to medium-high heat. Once hot, test the oil, by dipping a teaspoon of batter into the oil; if there are active bubbles all around it, it’s ready. Dip each of the stuffed and floured chiles into the egg batter, making sure that they are entirely covered in batter.
  • In batches, place them in the hot oil without overcrowding, trying to have the side that was open or sealed with the toothpick facing up. Spoon some of the hot oil on top, so that it will seal the chile. Fry for about 2 minutes per side, flipping genly with a slotted spoon, until golden brown. Transfer to a paper-towel covered drying rack or platter.

To serve:

  • Heat the salsa roja. Serve the chiles with a generous amount of salsa roja spooned on top. Alternatively, you can place the chiles in a casserole and top with the heated salsa roja. Eat while hot and melty!