Antojos or Snacks

Ceviche Tostadas Puerto Vallarta

ceviche tostadas
Print Recipe
4.34 from 6 votes

Ceviche Tostadas Puerto Vallarta

Ceviche Tostadas Puerto Vallarta recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 10 “Quiero más Tacos”
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, cilantro, fish, jalapeno, lime, serrano, Tomato
Servings: 10 tostadas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 pound very fresh mackerel fillets or other saltwater fish fillets, such as grouper, halibut, striped bass, red snapper, or fluke, skinned, rinsed, and cut into 1-2 inch pieces
  • 1 cup peeled and coarsely chopped carrots
  • 1 cup fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 jalapeño or serrano chile halved, seeded if desired, and finely chopped
  • 2 tablespoons finely chopped white onion
  • 3 tablespoons chopped cilantro leaves
  • ½ teaspoon dried Mexican oregano
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • Pinch of freshly ground black pepper
  • 10 tostadas homemade or store bought
  • 1 large ripe tomato thinly sliced
  • 1 large ripe avocado halved, pitted, meat scooped out, and sliced

Instructions

  • Place the fish and carrots in a food processor and pulse 5-6 times, or until the mixture is finely chopped, taking care not to turn it into a puree. Alternatively you could mince with a sharp knife.
  • Place the fish mixture in a large bowl, pour the lime juice over it, and gently toss. Cover and marinate at room temperature for 30-45 minutes.
  • Drain the fish mixture through a fine mesh sieve, pressing out as much liquid as possible with the back of a spoon. Return the fish to the bowl and stir in the chile, onion, cilantro, oregano, salt, and pepper. Mix well. Cover and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes, or up to 12 hours, so all the flavors come together.
  • When ready to serve, taste the ceviche for salt and pepper and add more if necessary.
  • Mound 2-3 tablespoons of ceviche on top of each tostada. Top each with a slice of tomato and avocado and a final sprinkling of salt.

Fried Shrimp Tacos with Apple Jicama Cucumber Slaw and Guacamole Salsa

fried shrimp tacos
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Fried Shrimp Tacos with Apple Jicama Cucumber Slaw and Guacamole Salsa

Fried Shrimp Tacos recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 10 “Quiero más Tacos”
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Chipotle, cucumber, flour tortillas, guacamole, Jicama, Salsa, Shrimp
Servings: 4 to 6
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the shrimp:

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground chipotle chile
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt plus more to season shrimp
  • 1 1/4 cups seltzer
  • 1 pound large shrimp peeled and deveined (tails off)
  • Oléico safflower oil

Instructions

  • Combine the flour, cumin, chipotle, and salt together in a medium bowl. Whisk in the seltzer water to make a batter.
  • Season the shrimp with salt.
  • In a heavy, wide skillet or casserole, pour oil to a depth of 4 inches and heat over medium for at least 5 minutes. Test the heat by dipping a wooden spoon or the tip of a piece of shrimp into the oil — it should bubble happily around whatever you introduce into it. Set a cooling rack on a baking sheet and cover the rack with paper towels. If you don’t have a cooling rack, just cover the baking sheet with paper towels.
  • Dip the shrimp into the batter and carefully drop into the hot oil. Fry until golden and crisp, turning once, about 2-3 minutes. Transfer to the cooling rack and season with salt.
  • Serve the shrimp on a warm tortilla topped with the slaw and guacamole salsa.

Notes

Tacos de Camarón con Ensalada de Jícama, Manzana y Pepino y Salsa de Guacamole

Mushroom Tacos with Chile de Árbol Salsa

Mushroom Tacos
Print Recipe
4.6 from 5 votes

Mushroom Tacos with Chile de Árbol Salsa

Mushroom Tacos with Chile de Árbol Salsa recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 10 “Quiero más Tacos”
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chile de arbol, cilantro, corn tortillas, Mushroom, Salsa
Servings: 6 tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons safflower oil
  • 3 garlic cloves peeled and roughly chopped
  • 2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves roughly chopped
  • 1 pound mixed mushrooms such as maitake, crimini, shitake, sliced into ¾ inch pieces
  • Kosher salt to taste
  • 3 tablespoons Chile de Árbol Salsa plus more to serve
  • 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves and upper stems, chopped, plus more to garnish
  • 6 warm corn or flour tortillas
  • Cilantro flowers to garnish (optional)

Instructions

  • Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Once hot add the garlic and thyme and once the garlic begins to just lightly brown around the edges, add the mushrooms. Let them cook for 3 minutes, then stir and season with salt. Again, let them sit undisturbed for 2-3 minutes, or as needed, allowing any liquid to cook off and until they are deeply browned. Once browned, stir in the chile de árbol salsa and cook for one minute while stirring, so the mushrooms absorb the flavor. Stir in the vinegar and the chopped cilantro. Remove from heat.
  • Spoon onto warm corn tortillas and garnish with cilantro and/or cilantro flowers, if using. Serve with extra chile de árbol salsa.

Notes

Tacos de Champiñones con Salsa de Chile de Arbol

Conchas

Conchas
Print Recipe
4.34 from 6 votes

Conchas

Francisco Migoya’s Conchas recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 7 “Getting to the Roots”
Cook Time25 mins
Course: Antojos, Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: sugar, vanilla
Servings: 15 conchas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the dough:

  • ½ cup (115g) whole milk, cold
  • cup (75g) water
  • 2 teaspoons (8g) instant dry yeast
  • cups (480g) bread flour
  • 4 eggs cold (190g)
  • ½ cup (120g) butter softened
  • cup, plus 2 teaspoons, (75g), sugar
  • teaspoons (12g) fine salt
  • teaspoons (10g) vanilla extract

For the topping:

  • cups (200g) powdered sugar
  • 1⅔ cups (200g) pastry flour
  • ¾ cup, plus 1 tablespoon, plus 1 teaspoon (200g) vegetable shortening
  • teaspoons (10g) vanilla extract

Optional flavorings:

  • ¼ cup, plus 2 tablespoons, plus 2 teaspoons (60g) any freeze-dried fruit powder such as dragon fruit
  • ¼ cup, plus 2 teaspoons (30g) cocoa powder
  • 2 tablespoons (12g) matcha powder
  • 1⅛ teaspoons (3g) any powdered spice such as cinnamon, pumpkin spice mix, etc.
  • teaspoons (3g) any citrus zest
  • teaspoons (3g) any tea finely ground

Instructions

To make the dough:

  • Dissolve the yeast in the milk and water in an electric mixer bowl using a whisk. Put the remaining ingredients on top. Start mixing on low speed using the hook attachment.
  • Once the dough ingredients have formed a homogenous mass, turn the speed up to medium high for 10-15 minutes until the dough reaches full gluten development. To check if the dough has reached this stage, first check if the dough looks smooth and uniform in the mixer. The second is whether the dough is “slapping” the sides of the bowl while it mixes. The third and definite test is to perform the windowpane test, which consists in taking a small piece of dough and gently stretching it with your fingers to get it to stretch as thinly as possible without tearing. If it can form a thin translucent membrane without tearing, the dough is ready to come off the mixer.
  • While the dough mixes, prepare a flat sheet pan by lining it with a lightly oiled non-stick rubber mat or plastic wrap.
  • After mixing the dough, take it out of the mixer and place it on a flat work surface area that has been lightly greased with spray oil to keep it from sticking. Perform a four-fold on the dough (this consists of flattening the dough with the palms of your hand into a square or rectangle shape as best as you possibly can folding each end in towards the center of the dough to create a smooth surface), then place the folded dough on the prepared sheet pan, seam side down.
  • Lightly oil the surface of the dough with spray oil and cover it with plastic wrap. Let the dough rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  • Flatten the dough as best you can to about 1 inch/2.5cm using the palms of your hands. Cover the dough again with plastic wrap and chill for at least 2 hours or overnight in refrigeration.

Meanwhile, make the topping:

  • Sift the powdered sugar and flour together in a mixer bowl, then add the shortening on top plus the vanilla extract and whatever additional optional flavorings. Using the paddle attachment, mix on low speed until the dough comes together to form one mass.
  • Place the concha topping dough between two sheets of plastic wrap or parchment paper. Roll the dough out to 4mm. Place on a sheet pan and into the freezer for 15 minutes (this helps with achieving a clean cut disc).
  • Cut the cold concha topping with a 2.4 inch/6 cm round cutter (weighing about 15g each). Place each topping disc on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper or a silpat and keep at room temperature until needed. If you are not using within 6-8 hours, wrap the sheet pan in plastic and place in refrigeration. It is important to note, when going to assemble the topping onto the dough balls, the topping must be at room temperature so it can be secured easily to the dough and stamped/scored in an even and clear design.
  • Alternatively, you can form the concha topping into 15g balls and reserve on a small sheet pan, wrapped with plastic, at room temperature, until needed. If you are not going to use the topping that day, keep it wrapped well with plastic in refrigeration.

To assemble the conchas:

  • Once it’s time to take the concha dough out of the refrigerator, remove the plastic wrap and flip it out onto a clean worktable. Peel off the non-stick rubber mat or plastic wrap that was used to line the sheet pan. Using a bench scraper or small knife, divide the dough into 70g pieces and shape each piece into a ball.
  • Place the dough balls onto three or four separate half sheet pans lined with oiled parchment paper with enough space between the dough balls to expand during proofing and eventually baking; five balls maximum per sheet pan, ideally four if you have enough sheet pans.
  • Take one disc of previously rolled out and cut concha topping. Center and place on top of a dough ball then press down lightly so it attaches well to the top and sides of the dough.
  • NOTE: If you do not roll out and pre-cut your concha topping, you can also use a tortilla press or your hands. Place a 15g room temperature ball of concha topping between two lightly oiled plastic sheets and press it gently using a tortilla press to about 2.4 inch/6 cm. If you do not have a tortilla press, press the topping with your hands, that are lightly oiled, until you achieve the proper diameter disc. Center and place the concha topping disc on the dough then press down lightly so it attaches well to the top and sides of the dough.
  • Directly after securing a disc of topping on the dough, use a concha cutter and press it onto the topping, forming the traditional shell-like pattern. If you do not have this cutter, use the tip of a paring knife to score the pattern on the topping. Continue, one at a time, securing a topping disc to the dough and stamping/scoring the topping directly after.
  • NOTE: It helps to achieve a nice even design with the topping if it is stamped/scored right after placing on the dough while the topping is still room temperature. Since the dough is cold, the topping quickly takes on that temperature as well making it firmer. The colder the topping gets, the more difficult it is to achieve a nice design on your conchas.
  • Proof the dough: If you are doing this at room temperature, cover the dough with a lightly tented clean plastic bag or a clean kitchen towel. It will take between 2-3 hours. If proofing in a fermenter/proof box, set it to 27℃/80℉ with 75% relative humidity it will take 1-1.5 hours.
  • During the last 30 minutes of proofing, turn a convection oven on to 175℃/350℉ or a still (home) oven to 190℃/375℉.
  • Bake in the convection or still oven for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown.

Notes

Courtesy Francisco Migoya

Pellizcadas

Pellizcadas
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Pellizcadas

Pellizcadas recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 7 “Getting to the Roots”
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Antojos
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cotija cheese, masa, queso fresco, refried beans
Servings: 18 pellizcadas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups (231g) masa harina
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 2/3 cups warm water plus more as needed
  • Oléico safflower oil

Toppings:

Instructions

To make the dough:

  • In a large, shallow mixing bowl, combine the masa harina and salt. Gradually add the warm water, stirring with your hands, to make a cohesive dough.
  • Mix and knead the dough with your hands in the bowl until it’s smooth and somewhat firm, about a minute or so. If the dough is sticking to your hands and feels wet, add more masa harina a teaspoon at a time. If the dough crumbles when you roll a piece into a ball, add more water a teaspoon at a time.
  • Cut the side seams of a quart-sized zip-top bag or plastic produce bag so that it opens flat along the bottom seam and then cut along the bottom seam to make two pieces of plastic. You can reuse this bag every time you make pellizcadas, sopes or tortillas. Set aside.
  • Divide the dough evenly into 18 pieces and roll each piece into a ball. Place the balls on a clean work surface and cover them with plastic wrap or a damp kitchen towel to keep them moist.
  • Preheat a comal, cast iron skillet, nonstick pan, or a griddle, over medium heat for 5 minutes, or until evenly hot.

To press the pellizcadas:

  • Working with one ball of dough at a time, sandwich it in between the plastic bag pieces on the bottom plate of a tortilla press. There should be a piece of plastic under the ball and another piece of plastic on top of the ball. Gently close the tortilla press until the dough is about 1/4” thick and about 3” to 4” in diameter. You may need to press it a couple times to get the desired thinness.

To cook pellizcadas:

  • Peel the top layer of plastic away from the pellizcada. Remove the pellizcada along with the bottom layer of plastic and place it in your palm with the plastic side up. Peel away the plastic and quickly, but gently, lay the pellizcada on the preheated pan. Cook for about 2 minutes on each side, until opaque and speckled, and they can easily be flipped without sticking to the pan.
  • Remove from the heat and place it on a flat surface or cutting board. At this point, it will not be cooked all the way through. Using a kitchen towel or cloth napkin to protect your fingers from the heat, press and gently pinch a rim around the edge of the pellizcada; the masa should still be soft enough to do this.
  • When finished forming all the pellizcadas, add oil to the comal or skillet, or brush each pellizcada with oil, and cook for one minute more on each side or until it’s cooked through and freckled with brown spots.
  • To serve immediately, remove pellizcadas from the heat and top each with a tablespoon of warm refried beans, some chicharrón en salsa, crumbled cheese, and chopped onion.
  • To serve later, wrap pellizcadas in a clean kitchen towel, seal in a plastic bag and refrigerate for up to 3 days. They can also be frozen for longer storage. Reheat on a hot surface (comal, pan, or griddle) for a few minutes before serving. If desired, reheat in a bit of oil to crisp up the outside of the pellizcada.

Jalisco-Style Chicken Tamales

Jalisco-Style Chicken Tamales
Print Recipe
3.8 from 5 votes

Jalisco-Style Chicken Tamales

Jalisco-style Chicken Tamales recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 6 “Tradition and Innovation”
Cook Time1 hr
Course: Antojos, Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chicken, jalapeno, masa, Poblano, Tamales, Tomato
Servings: 16 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

Tamal dough:

  • cups (326g) masa harina
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup (184g) lard or vegetable shortening
  • cups (738g) chicken broth

Filling:

  • 3 poblano chiles
  • 1 pound ripe tomatoes or one 14.5-ounce can of fire roasted tomatoes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup (71g) chopped white onion
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled and finely chopped
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 4 whole cloves stemmed and crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (70g) chopped manzanilla olives stuffed with pimentos
  • 1/4 cup (46g) coarsely chopped capers
  • 1/4 cup diced pickled jalapeños
  • 3 cups (330g) shredded cooked chicken

For assembly:

  • 30 to 36 dried corn husks

Instructions

To make the tamal dough:

  • Whisk together the masa harina, baking powder and salt in a medium bowl.
  • Place the lard or vegetable shortening in a mixer set with the paddle attachment and beat on high until very light, about 1 to 2 minutes. Reduce the speed and add the chicken broth and masa harina mixture alternately, stopping to scrape down the sides of the bowl as needed. Once it has all been added, raise speed to medium and continue beating for about 4 to 8 minutes, until the dough is homogeneous, very fluffy, and aerated.
  • To test if the dough is ready, drop 1/2 teaspoon into a cup of cold water. If it floats, it is ready. If it sinks, beat longer to aerate further.

To make the filling:

  • Place poblano chiles and tomatoes (if using fresh) on a baking sheet covered with aluminum foil. Place under the broiler and char for 8 to 10 minutes, flipping a couple times in between, until charred, soft, and wrinkled.
  • Remove the poblanos and tomatoes from the oven. Place the poblanos in a plastic bag, close the bag, and set aside to allow the poblanos to steam and sweat for at least 10 minutes, and up to 2 hours. Remove the poblanos from the bag and in a bowl of water, or under a gentle stream of running water, peel away the charred skin. Next, cut a slit down the side of each poblano and remove the seeds and stems before cutting into strips of about 1” x 1/4”. Set aside.
  • Chop the broiled tomatoes into 1/2″ pieces. If using canned tomatoes, simply chop them.
  • In a large skillet, heat the vegetable oil over medium heat. Once hot, add the onion and cook until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, a minute or two longer.
  • Add the chopped tomatoes (including the skins, seeds, and juices), cumin, crushed tops of the whole cloves, and salt. Cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until the mixture is dark red and thickened. Add poblanos, olives, capers, pickled jalapeños and chicken, stirring to combine. Cook for 5 more minutes.

To assemble tamales:

  • In a large bowl, soak the dried corn husks in hot water for at least 10 minutes, or until soft and pliable, drain.
  • Working with one corn husk at a time, lay it out with the tapered end pointing towards you. Portion about 1/4 cup (50g) masa onto the husk – a scone or muffin scoop works well here. Spread the masa into a rectangle, about 3” x 5”; the layer should be about 1/4” thick, leaving a border of at least 1/2” on the sides and at least 1” on the bottom. Place 2 tablespoons of the filling (about 40g) in the middle of the rectangle.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (the masa will start to swaddle the filling). Fold the joined sides of the husk together to one side of the tamale, wrapping them in the same direction around the tamal. Fold up the empty section of the husk, with the tapering end from the bottom up and spread the tamal gently so it is evenly distributed. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open. Place the tamales as vertically as you can in a container (open side up) and repeat the assembly with the remaining masa and filling.

To steam tamales:

  • Fill a steamer with water right up to the bottom of the steaming base or basket and bring the water to a simmer over medium heat. Line the steamer base or basket with a layer of soaked corn husks. Place the prepared tamales as vertically as you can into the prepared steamer with the open end facing up. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some more corn husks, so the tamales will be snug and not shift around. Cover the tamales with more soaked corn husks and steam, covered with a lid, for about an hour.
  • Turn off the heat and let them rest and settle in the steamer for at least 10 minutes. You can test the tamales for doneness by unwrapping one and checking to see that it releases easily from the husk. If it doesn’t, return the steamer to the heat, checking them at 5-minutes increments. Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer.

Storage information:

  • Tamales can be made ahead several days before and stored in the refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer; for refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.

Notes

Tamales Tapatíos

Tres Chiles Guacamole

Tres Chiles Guacamole
Print Recipe
2.6 from 5 votes

Tres Chiles Guacamole

Tres Chiles Guacamole recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 4 “Los Mariachis”
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Antojos, Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, cilantro, jalapeno, lime, serrano
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 jalapeño minced
  • 1 dried chile de árbol minced
  • 1 serrano minced
  • Juice and zest of 1 lime
  • ¼ cup roughly chopped cilantro
  • 2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 4 large ripe Mexican avocados pitted and diced
  • 5 ounces (1 cup) multi-colored cherry tomatoes halved

Instructions

  • Place all ingredients, except for the avocado and tomatoes, in a molcajete and mash or mix until pasty. Add the avocado and mash until you reach your desired consistency. Fold in the tomatoes, taste and adjust seasoning as needed.

Notes

Guacamole con Tres Chiles

Tepache

Tepache
Print Recipe
3.8 from 5 votes

Tepache

Tepache recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 3 “Jalisco Classics”
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cinnamon, piloncillo, pineapple
Servings: 8 to 10 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 liters, or 16 cups, water
  • 1 pound piloncillo or dark brown sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1 ripe pineapple or about 3 cups
  • 1 cup lager beer

Instructions

  • Using the traditional big earthenware jug (or a large pot), bring to a boil the 16 cups water along with the piloncillo, cinnamon stick, and whole cloves. Simmer, stirring once in a while, for about 10 minutes or until the piloncillo has dissolved.
  • While the water is simmering, wash the pineapple thoroughly, and remove the stem and bottom. Cut it into 2 inch cubes, without taking off its rind.
  • Once the flavored water is ready, turn off heat and add in the pineapple chunks and cover. Let rest for 2 days, or 48 hours, in a warm area of your kitchen. The mixture will begin to ferment and bubble on the surface. Add a cup of lager beer, stir well, and let it sit for up to 12 hours more. Don’t let it ferment much longer, or you may end up with vinegar instead!
  • Strain tepache through a fine strainer or cheesecloth, and serve very cold. You can either refrigerate it or serve over ice cubes.

Notes

Pineapple Drink

Roasted Tomatoes on Everything

Roasted Tomatoes on Everything
Print Recipe
2.67 from 6 votes

Roasted Tomatoes on Everything

These roasted tomatoes can be used on avocado toast, pasta, grilled asparagus, an egg scramble or a cheese omelet.
Cook Time45 mins
Servings: 2 cups approximately
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds ripe cherry tomatoes
  • 1 to 2 dried chiles de árbol stemmed, thinly sliced
  • 3 to 4 shallots about 1/2 pound, outer layer peeled, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves peeled, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup Oléico safflower oil
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

Instructions

  • Set the rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 400°F.
  • On a small baking sheet, combine the tomatoes, chiles de árbol, shallots, garlic, oil, salt and pepper and toss to combine.
  • Place in the oven and roast for 45 to 50 minutes, until tomatoes have completely softened and almost fallen apart and are charred on the outside.
  • The roasted tomatoes can be used on avocado toast, pasta, grilled asparagus, an egg scramble or a cheese omelet.
  • Note: It is important that the tomatoes be ripe for full flavor. If they seem hard or a bit unripe, leave them in a bowl on your countertop for a few days so they can continue ripening until fully colored and softened. 

Notes

Jitomatitos Rostizados para Todo

Wild Crunchy Granola

Wild Crunchy Granola
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Wild Crunchy Granola

A crunchy granola loaded with nuts, sunflower seeds, pepitas, amaranth, and quinoa. You can sweeten it up with dried cherries, chocolate chips, and coconut flakes as you please. 
Cook Time55 mins
Course: Breakfast, Snack
Cuisine: American
Keyword: granola
Servings: 6 to 7 cups
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups rolled oats
  • 1 cup pecans very coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup raw cashews very coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup shelled, unsalted peanuts very coarsely chopped
  • 2/3 cup hulled, raw pumpkin seeds or pepitas
  • 1/3 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup amaranth
  • 1/3 cup white quinoa
  • 1 tablespoon kosher salt
  • 2/3 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup Oléico safflower oil
  • 1/2 cup dried sour cherries optional to taste
  • Bittersweet chocolate chips optional to taste
  • Sweetened coconut flakes optional to taste

Instructions

  • Set the baking rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 300°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  • In a medium bowl, add the rolled oats, pecans, cashews, peanuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, amaranth seeds, and quinoa along with the salt. Toss to combine. 
  • In a small saucepan, combine the honey with the oil. Set over low heat and stir for a minute or so, until completely dissolved. 
  • Pour the honey and oil mixture over the nuts and seeds mixture and toss to coat. Spread over the prepared baking sheet and place in the oven. Bake until lightly golden brown, about 55 minutes, stirring once in between.
  • Remove from the oven and let cool. Scrape onto a bowl and add the dried sour cherries, chocolate chips and coconut flakes to taste. Store in a closed container with a tight lid.
  • Use the granola as a snack to munch on its own, on top of yogurt, ice cream, over fruit, or mixed with queso fresco or on top of fresh ricotta cheese.

Notes

Granola crujiente

Three-Cheese Chicken Enchiladas

Three-Cheese Chicken Enchiladas
Print Recipe
5 from 6 votes

Three-Cheese Chicken Enchiladas

These enchiladas are typical of northern Mexico and use the region’s go-to red salsa, as well as three cheeses and crema.
Cook Time20 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cheese, chicken, enchiladas
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 16 corn tortillas homemade or store-bought
  • Double recipe Colorado Chile Salsa
  • 4 cups shredded cooked chicken or rotisserie chicken
  • 1 cup Mexican crema or sour cream
  • 2 cups grated Oaxaca cheese or mozzarella (8 ounces)
  • 2 cups grated asadero or Muenster, or Monterey Jack cheese (8 ounces)
  • 1 cup crumbled Cotija cheese or grated Pecorino Romano or Parmigiano-Reggiano (4 ounces) 
  • 1 ripe avocado halved, pitted, and sliced, for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 400℉, with a rack in the middle. Heat a comal or large skillet over medium-low heat for at least 5 minutes.
  • One or two at a time, heat the tortillas on the comal or skillet, without overlapping, for about a minute per side, until malleable and warm. Cover or wrap in a kitchen towel to keep warm.
  • Pour about 1 cup of the salsa into a 9-x-13-inch baking dish and spread it evenly over the bottom. One by one, place each tortilla on a cutting board and sprinkle about 1/4 cup of the chicken evenly down the middle. Roll up into a chubby soft taco and place seam down in the baking dish. Pour the remaining salsa over the enchiladas and top with the cream. Cover with the grated cheeses and sprinkle the Cotija, Romano, or Parmesan over the top.
  • Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, or until the cheese has completely melted and begun to lightly brown around the edges. Serve hot.

Notes

Enchiladas de Pollo con Tres Quesos

Asparagus Mushroom & Goat Cheese Enchiladas with Pine Nut Mole Sauce

Print Recipe
4.67 from 6 votes

Asparagus Mushroom & Goat Cheese Enchiladas with Pine Nut Mole Sauce

The tortillas are dipped into the luscious mole and wrapped around the filling of seared mushrooms and crisp-tender asparagus seasoned with orange zest and thyme, and goat cheese, which melts when the enchiladas are topped with the hot mole sauce. When you have vegetarians coming over for dinner, this dish is a must.
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: enchiladas, Vegetarian
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the Pine Nut Mole:

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1/4 cup chopped white onion
  • 1 cup raw pine nuts
  • 1 garlic clove chopped
  • 1 pound ripe tomatoes coarsely chopped
  • 2 ancho chiles stemmed, seeded, and coarsely chopped or broken into pieces
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken broth homemade or store-bought
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon packed brown sugar or to taste

For the Filling:

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 pound white button or baby bella (cremini) mushrooms cleaned and diced
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 pound asparagus tough ends removed, peeled from just below the tips tothe bottom, and cut into 1-inch pieces
  • 2 teaspoons chopped fresh thyme or 1/2 teaspoon dried
  • 1 tablespoon grated orange zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper

To assemble:

  • 12 corn tortillas
  • 6 ounces goat cheese cut into chunks (about 3/4 cup)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped chives for garnish
  • 2 tablespoons pine nuts toasted, for garnish

Instructions

To make the mole:

  • Heat 2 tablespoons of the oil in a large casserole or heavy pot over medium heat. Add the onion and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until completely softened.Stir in the pine nuts and garlic and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, until the garlic becomes fragrant and changes color and the pine nuts are light brown and smell toasty. Raise the heat to medium- high, add another tablespoon of olive oil and the tomatoes, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the tomatoes soften and break down, 7 to 8 minutes. Add the ancho chiles, orange juice, broth, salt, and brown sugar and bring to a simmer.Simmer, stirring occasionally, until the chiles have rehydrated and plumped up and the sauce has thickened, about 8 minutes more.
  • Transfer the contents of the pot to a blender and let cool for a few minutes, then puree, in batches if necessary, until completely smooth.
  • Rinse out and dry the pot, add the remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and heat over medium heat. Add the pine nut mole, cover partially, and simmer for 5 to 6 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the sauce has darkened and thickened a bit more. Cover and set aside.

To make the filling:

  • Heat the oil in a large skillet or casserole over medium-high heat. Add the mushrooms and let them sear and brown, without stirring, for 3 to 4 minutes. Push the mushrooms to the sides of the pan and add the butter to the middle. When the butter begins to foam, add the asparagus, thyme, orange zest, salt, and pepper to taste, stir together with the mushrooms, and cook, stirring occasionally, until the asparagus is crisp-tender, 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat.

To assemble:

  • Heat and lightly toast the tortillas on a hot comal or skillet.
  • Dip a tortilla in the mole, place it on a plate, and top with 2 to 3 tablespoons of the mushroom and asparagus mixture and a tablespoon of crumbled goat cheese. Roll up into a chubby enchilada and place seam side down on a serving platter. Continue with the remaining tortillas and filling.
  • Reheat the sauce if necessary. Spoon a generous amount of sauce on top of the enchiladas (use it all if you wish), garnish with the chives and toasted pine nuts, and serve.

Notes

Enchiladas de Espárragos, Cahmiñones y Queso de Cabra con Mole de Piñón

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 10 "Sabores Norteños"
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 40 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: anaheim chiles, cheese, chile verde, Corn, corn husks, elote, masa, Mexico, pati’s mexican table, poblanos, queso, rajas, Sonora, Sonoran, tamal, Tamales
Servings: 15 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the fresh corn masa:

  • 4 cups white corn kernels fresh or thawed frozen
  • 1/2 cup evaporated milk
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 cup corn flour for tamales or masa harina
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

For the filling:

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 cup slivered white onion
  • 1 pound fresh Anaheim chiles roasted, sweated, peeled, stemmed, seeded and cleaned, sliced into thin strips
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

To assemble the tamales:

  • 30 dried corn husks plus more for lining the steamer
  • 1 1/2 cups grated melting cheese such as asadero, quesadilla, Oaxaca, Monterey Jack, or mozzarella

Instructions

To make the fresh corn masa:

  • Coarsely puree the corn kernels along with the evaporated milk in a food processor or blender. The mixture should be a bit chunky, not completely smooth.
  • Combine the butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, and beat at medium speed until very soft and creamy, about 2 minutes. Scrape down the bowl and beaters.
  • In a medium bowl, combine the masa harina, the baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
  • Reduce the mixer speed to low and alternate adding the ground corn mixture with the masa harina mixture. Once all is incorporated, add 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil, increase the speed to medium and continue beating until completely amalgamated, creamy and fluffy, about 7 to 8 more minutes.

To make the filling:

  • Heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a skillet or sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until it begins to soften, about 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the sliced roasted Anaheim chiles, sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt, and continue to cook for another 3 to 4 minutes, stirring often, until the onions are very soft and all of the flavors have combined. Remove from the heat and scrape into a bowl.

To assemble the tamales:

  • Remove about 30 good size corn husks from the package and place in a large bowl of hot water. Soak for a couple of minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. One by one, lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. If the husks seem thin, layer a second corn husk on top. Leaving a 1 to 1 1/2-inch space at the bottom, a minimum of 1/2 inch space on the sides and a little more than that at the top, spread about 1/4 cup masa into an approximately 2×3-inch rectangle. The masa layer will be a little thicker than 1/4 inch. Place a very generous tablespoon of the Anaheim and onion filling along with a very generous tablespoon of the grated cheese lengthwise down the middle of the masa.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa swaddles the filling) and fold the joined edges to one side, rolling them around the tamal. Fold up the empty tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open. If the tamale won’t hold, you can tear strips from unused tamale wrappers and tie them around the bottom. Gently press from the bottom to the top to even the filling out, without squeezing too hard.
  • If not steaming right away, place on a plate or sheet pan, cover with plastic, and refrigerate. You can assemble them a day ahead of steaming. You can also steam them ahead and reheat (see below).
  • To prepare the tamalera or steamer: Place water in the bottom pan of a steamer, so that water is under the steamer basket or rack, and bring it to a simmer. If you want to be reassured that the water hasn’t all evaporated during the long steaming time, place a penny in it so you can hear it dancing around. Line the steamer with one or two layers of soaked corn husks.

To cook the tamales:

  • When you have all tamales ready, place them as vertically as you can in the prepared steamer with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, cover tightly with a lid, and steam covered for 1 1/2 hours. Allow the finished tamales to rest for 10 to 15 minutes. You know the tamales are ready when they come away easily from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks, you will see the moisture, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead and stored for several days in the refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.

Notes

Tamal de Elote con Rajas y Queso

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos
Print Recipe
5 from 6 votes

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos

Double Stacked Shrimp and Cheese Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 7 "Legends of the Sonoran Sea"
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, cheese, Chiles, corn tortillas, Mexico, Oaxaca cheese, pati’s mexican table, Shrimp, Sonora, Sonoran, tacos
Servings: 6 to 8 double tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ripe tomatoes
  • 4 garlic cloves peeled
  • 2 to 3 chiles de árbol stemmed, keep the seeds (more to taste)
  • 2 teaspoons oregano
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste, plus more for seasoning the shrimp
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil divided, plus more to cook the tacos
  • 2 pounds medium shrimp rinsed, shelled, and butterflied
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter divided
  • 12 to 16 corn tortillas
  • 3 cups melty shredded cheese such as mozzarella, asadero, Oaxaca, quesadilla, or Monterey Jack
  • 1 large ripe avocado halved, pitted, thinly sliced

Instructions

  • Combine the tomatoes, garlic and chiles de árbol in a medium saucepan, cover with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and cook for about 10 minutes, until the tomatoes and garlic are completely soft and the chiles are plump and rehydrated. Transfer to a blender with 1 cup of the cooking liquid. Add the oregano, tomato paste and salt, and puree until completely smooth.
  • Heat the 1 tablespoon of the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Once hot, pour in the tomato puree, cover partially and cook, stirring occasionally, for 5 to 6 minutes, until the mixture has thickened and darkened, and the flavors have intensified. Turn off the heat.
  • Season the butterflied shrimp with salt and pepper. Melt 1 tablespoon butter with 1 tablespoon oil in a large sauté pan over high heat. Once the butter begins to foam, add half the shrimp and quickly sear for a minute or so per side. They should be browned and just cooked through. Be careful not to overcook or the shrimp will be rubbery. Scrape into a bowl. Melt another tablespoon butter and oil together and repeat with the second batch.
  • Heat a comal, griddle or large skillet, preferably nonstick or cast iron, over medium heat. Add a tablespoon or two of oil to the surface.
  • One by one, lightly sauce the tortillas: briefly dip them into the tomato sauce, making sure the entire tortilla is coated (I like to use a pair of rubber tipped tongs but you could also just use you hands) and lay as many as will fit on the comal or griddle without overlapping. Top each tortilla with 2 to 3 tablespoons shredded cheese. Leave for a couple of minutes, until the cheese begins to melt and the bottoms of the sauced tortillas begin to dry and brown a little. Then, using a spatula, stack two sauced, browned and cheese-topped tortillas, one on top of another.
  • Don’t worry if the tortilla that you scrape up to stack on top of the other one sticks and tears a little bit or if it is not sitting evenly on top. Spoon some seared shrimp on top of each stack, gently fold with a spatula and continue cooking for a couple of minutes, until the cheese has completely melted and begun to ooze out and create a crust.
  • Remove from the heat and serve hot. Top with slices of ripe avocado.

Notes

Tacos Bravos de Toño

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada
Print Recipe
4.8 from 5 votes

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada

Sonoran Style Shrimp and Scallop Tostada recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 7 "Legends of the Sonoran Sea"
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Cachoreada, chiltepín chiles, mayonnaise, Mexico, pati’s mexican table, Salsa, Scallops, Shrimp, Sonora, Sonoran, tostadas
Servings: 6 to 8 big tostadas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the mayonnaise:

  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • Pinch of kosher or sea salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

For the tostadas:

Instructions

To make the mayonnaise:

  • In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise with the lime zest. Season with salt and black pepper. Mix well and set aside.

To make the tostadas:

  • Have the three salsas prepared and ready to use, and the tostadas within reach.
  • Season the shrimp and scallops with the salt and pepper. Heat 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon oil in a very large skillet over high heat. Once the butter has begun to foam, add the shrimp. Cook for 1 or 2 minutes per side, just until nicely seared and browned on the outside but not overcooked inside. Scrape into a bowl. Return the skillet to the heat, add the remaining butter and oil, and once the butter foams, add the scallops. Cook for a minute per side, until the tops and bottoms are browned and the middles are no longer translucent, and remove from the heat. The scallops should be medium rare. As soon as you can handle them, slice thin and set aside.
  • Spread about a tablespoon of the mayonnaise on each tostada, top with a layer of sliced scallops, a couple of tablespoons of the salsa bandera, and then a layer of the shrimp. Crown with avocado slices. Top the avocado slices with a couple of tablespoons of salsa negra and add apple chiltepin salsita or another hot sauce to taste. Serve immediately, passing more salsa negra around the table for people to add as desired.

Notes

Cachoreada

Beef, Potato and Anaheim Chimichanga

beef, potato, and anaheim chile chimichanga
Print Recipe
4 from 6 votes

Beef, Potato and Anaheim Chimichanga

Beef, Potato and Anaheim Chimichanga recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 6 "Sonoran Family Favorites for Sami"
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time2 hrs 30 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: beef, chimichanga, flour tortillas, mexican crema, Mexico, pati’s mexican table, Potato, queso fresco, Sonora, Sonoran
Servings: 8 to 12 chimichangas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the cooked meat:

  • 2 pounds beef chuck round or stewing meat, cut into 1- to 2-inch pieces
  • 1/2 white onion
  • 6 garlic cloves peeled
  • 2 teaspoons kosher or sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds

For the seasoned cooked meat:

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 cup chopped white onion
  • 3/4 pound, 3 medium, potatoes peeled and diced (about 2 cups)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt divided
  • 1/2 pound ripe roma tomatoes cored and diced
  • 4 fresh Anaheim chiles roasted, peeled, seeded and diced

For the chimichangas:

  • 8 to 12 large flour tortillas
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 cups shredded romaine or iceberg lettuce
  • 1 cup crumbled queso fresco
  • Mexican crema optional
  • Diced tomato optional
  • Ripe diced avocado optional
  • Sonoran Roasted Salsa or salsa of your choice

Instructions

To cook the meat:

  • Place the meat in a large soup pot or casserole and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Skim off any foam. Add the halved onion, garlic cloves, 2 teaspoons salt, black peppercorns, bay leaves, oregano, coriander and cumin seeds, and stir well. Reduce heat to medium low, cover and cook for 1 1/2 hours, or until the meat is fork tender and shreds easily. Remove from the heat.
  • Remove the meat from the broth, set aside, and strain the broth. Reserve 1 1/2 cups of the broth for later use and store or freeze the rest if you want to use it for something else. Once the meat has cooled enough to handle, shred or chop into smaller pieces.

To make the seasoned cooked meat:

  • Heat the oil in a large wide casserole or skillet over medium heat. Add the onion and the potatoes, season with 1/2 teaspoon salt, and cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the onions have softened and the potatoes have begun to brown. Stir in the tomatoes and cook for 3 to 5 minutes, or until the tomatoes are soft and mushy. Add the chiles and the other 1/2 teaspoon salt and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes, stirring often, until the mixture is nicely seasoned and blended together. Stir in the shredded meat and reserved meat broth and cook until the broth is mostly absorbed, the potatoes have completely softened, and the mixture is nicely amalgamated and delicious. It should be moist but not wet.

To make the chimichangas:

  • Heat a comal, griddle or skillet over medium low heat for at least 3 to 4 minutes. Heat the flour tortillas a couple at a time (or 1 at a time if that’s all you can fit in the skillet or on the griddle in a single layer) for about a minute per side, until completely heated through. Remove tortillas and one by one, top with a couple of generous spoonfuls of the shredded cooked beef. Roll to enclose the filling, and after the first roll, fold in the sides and continue to roll, making an elongated burrito-shaped package.
  • Once the packets are ready, heat 2 tablespoons oil in a skillet over medium heat. When the oil is hot, place the chimichangas in the pan seam side down and fry for a minute on each side, until lightly colored. Serve garnished with lettuce, queso, and if desired crema, tomato, avocado and salsa.

Notes

Chimichanga de Guisado de Res

My Favorite Queso Fundido paired with Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila

Jaw-dropping. As soon as you set it on a table it will fly off. Guaranteed. Especially if I am around!

Queso fundido is the epitome of an antojo. What we Mexicans call a food craving that can be eaten anytime of day as a quick snack, or a full meal if eaten in a big enough amount. Antojo literally translates to craving, and I don’t know a single Mexican that doesn’t drool over the thought of a queso fundido.

Queso fundido is not a cheese dip. Queso fundido is not a cheese sauce. Queso fundido is the real deal. It is real cheese. Tons of it. You throw a combination of deliciously flavorful melty cheeses onto a baking dish or a traditional earthenware cazuela. Then place it on a heat source — it can be on a burner, in the oven, under the broiler — until the cheese not only melts, but becomes super bubbly on top and starts making a crust all around the edges.

Wait. Then come the toppings. The most typical and popular toppings in restaurants in Mexico City, where I grew up, are poblano rajas, chorizo and mushrooms. They are separate offerings, so you choose if you want your queso with chorizo or with rajas or mushrooms. Different restaurants have their variations, for example, it can be rajas with caramelized onions, different kinds of chorizo, cultivated or wild mushrooms cooked with epazote or dried chiles, to name some.

When I make queso at home, I like to make a combo of my favorite toppings. No one can stop me and no one should stop you! My take combines caramelized onions and poblano chiles, throws in a bit of seeded and diced tomato for an added juicy bite and tons of crisp chunks of flavorful chorizo.

Most people I know like their queso fundido on flour tortillas. But it is you and your guests’ choice if they want corn tortillas, too. If you have some some salsas and guacamole, place them on the table for optional add ons.

Whichever way, have your Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila out to chase your queso fundido tacos and to wash down that queso fundido. I like to serve it neat or on the rocks as it has such a smooth taste.

Once everything is on the table, all bets are off. Run for it, if you want a chance to make a queso fundido taco before it disappears.

Poblano Rajas Chorizo Queso Fundido

poblano rajas chorizo queso fundido
Print Recipe
3.86 from 7 votes

Poblano Rajas and Chorizo Queso Fundido

The popular Mexican antojo, or craving, Queso Fundido topped with chorizo, onion, poblano rajas, and tomato. 
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time35 mins
Total Time50 mins
Course: Appetizer, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Chorizo, Queso Fundido
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil plus more to grease the baking dish
  • 1/3 pound Mexican chorizo casings removed, coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1/4 white onion halved and thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
  • 1 poblano chile roasted, sweated, peeled, cut into strips
  • 1 ripe Roma tomato cored, seeded, cut into small dice
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1 pound (or 4 cups) combination of shredded Mexican-style melty cheeses such as Asadero, quesadilla and Oaxaca (can sub with mozzarella, Muenster and Monterey Jack)
  • 8 to 10 flour or corn tortillas
  • 1 ripe avocado sliced
  • Serve with salsa of your choice optional
  • Pair with Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila neat or on the rocks

Instructions

  • Heat the oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the chorizo, cook for 4 to 5 minutes, breaking it into smaller pieces with a couple of spatulas or wooden spoons until crisp and brown. Remove from the heat and scrape into a bowl.
  • Set a rack on upper third tier of the oven and preheat to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Return the skillet to medium heat, add the butter and once it melts, add the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally and scraping the bottom of the pan, for 6 to 7 minutes, until they have wilted and begun to brown around the edges. Add the poblano pepper strips, tomato, and salt, and cook for another 3 to 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and transfer to a bowl.
  • Place shredded cheese in a gently oiled shallow baking dish that can comfortably hold it. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes, or until completely melted. Remove from the oven. Top with the crispy chorizo and poblano rajas mixture. Place back in the oven and bake for another 7 to 8 minutes, until cheese is oozing and browned along the edges and part of the top.
  • Meanwhile, preheat a comal or large skillet over medium-low heat. Heat the tortillas, making sure they are not on top of each other, until completely warmed, puffed and slightly browned. Place in a tortilla warmer or wrap in a clean cloth or kitchen towel.
  • Remove the queso from the oven and place on the table along with the warm tortillas, ripe avocado slices, and salsa of choice, if desired. Let everyone assemble their tacos!

Notes

Queso Fundido

Sonoran Hot Dogs

Sonoran Hot Dog
Print Recipe
3.67 from 6 votes

Sonoran Hot Dogs

Sonoran Hot Dogs, courtesy of Daniel Contreras of El Güero Canelo Restaurant, from Pati's Mexican Table, Episode 13, "How Do You Say Tucson?"
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Course
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: Arizona, bacon, Hot Dog, Mexican, Sonoran, Tucson, Turkey Hot Dog
Servings: 4 hot dogs
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 slices bacon
  • 4 turkey hot dogs
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 cup chopped white onion
  • 4 güero chiles or banana peppers
  • 4 hot dog buns
  • 1 cup cooked pinto beans warmed up

Toppings:

  • Chopped raw white onion
  • Chopped tomato
  • Jalapeño hot sauce or salsa of your choice
  • Mustard
  • Mayonnaise

Instructions

  • On a cutting board, roll one slice of bacon around each hot dog. Place the tip of the hot dog over one end of the bacon slice, then roll the hot dog around and around on the diagonal so that the bacon wraps around it and covers it entirely. If you get to the end of the hot dog and there is still some bacon left, roll back in the other direction until the whole strip of bacon is rolled around the hot dog.






  • Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the bacon-wrapped hot dogs and cook, turning every 2 to 3 minutes, until crisped and browned on all sides. Remove from the skillet and set aside.



  • In the same skillet, heat the vegetable oil and add the 1 cup chopped white onion. Sauté the onion until it softens and becomes translucent, about 5 minutes. Scrape into a small bowl and set aside.
  • Meanwhile, char the güero chiles on a hot comal or skillet set over medium heat for 3
    to 6 minutes. Turn it once or twice, until its skin has lightly charred. Remove from heat.

To assemble:

  • Place one bacon-wrapped hot dog in a bun, then spoon on a generous tablespoon of warm pinto beans and about a tablespoon of the cooked onion. Top with some chopped raw onion, chopped tomato, hot sauce or salsa, mustard, and mayonnaise. Repeat with the remaining hot dogs and serve each one with a charred güero chile on the side.

Notes

Courtesy Daniel Contreras, El Güero Canelo Restaurant

Canela Pumpkin Torito

Over the years, and traveling all around to different cities, I’ve realized it’s incredible how much you can learn about Mexican food being in the US. Because Mexicans you meet here come from so many different parts of Mexico, each with their own unique regional cuisine and traditions.

Such was the case when Nándo and Germán responded to my post on social media wondering if anyone in New York would be willing to invite me over for lunch, while I was there for work earlier this month.

Nándo and Germán generously welcomed me into their home in Brooklyn. Where their friends were waiting, including Cristina who traveled all the way from Arizona. I was so thrilled to meet them!

Germán, whose family is in Puebla, made his mom’s adobo for me. Meanwhile, since they were so kind to open their doors to me and do the cooking, drinks were on me. So I brought the tequila. I whipped up a version of a traditional drink from Veracruz for everyone, called a torito. A name I love because torito translates to “little bull,” which refers to the little kick it gives. It can be deceiving because it’s so sweet and creamy.

Since pumpkin is such an essential ingredient in Mexico, I did a pumpkin torito this time. It has pumpkin puree, canela or true cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, vanilla, and sweetened condensed milk. To give it that kick, I use Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila – its deep, rustic, caramelly flavor goes harmoniously with the pumpkin.

When the meal was ready, I felt like I was in a fonda back in Mexico. Nándo made my arroz rojo to go with Germán’s adobo chicken, and we had pinto beans on the side. It was phenomenal, really delicious and comforting.

I felt honored Germán made his mom’s adobo for me, as sharing family recipes truly means a lot.

If Nándo and Germán weren’t already kind enough, they let me bring along my production team and their cameras. So you can watch what happened in the video below…

And, of course, I want you to be able to try my spiced up canela pumpkin torito for the holidays. The recipe is below, so invite over some friends, grab a bottle of tequila, and whip up a batch.

Canela Pumpkin Tortito
Canela Pumpkin Torito
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Canela Pumpkin Torito

Since pumpkin is such an essential ingredient in Mexico, I did a pumpkin torito. It has pumpkin puree, canela or true cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, vanilla, sweetened condensed milk, and a splash of tequila (or leave it out if you choose).
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, cinnamon, cocktail, Fall, frappe, holiday, pumpkin, spiced, tequila, torito
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila
  • 2 12-ounce cans evaporated milk
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 3/4 cup smooth pumpkin puree
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground canela or true cinnamon
  • Pinch ground nutmeg
  • Pinch ground cloves
  • Ice to serve

Instructions

  • Place the tequila, evaporated milk, condensed milk, pumpkin puree, vanilla extract, canela or cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves in the blender and puree until smooth. Transfer to a pitcher, cover and refrigerate until chilled.
  • Alternatively, you may pour directly over ice cubes or add some ice cubes to your blender and make it a frappé! In any case, serve very cold.

Notes

Torito de Calabaza y Canela

Chilorio Sincronizadas

Chilorio Sincronizadas
Print Recipe
4 from 6 votes

Chilorio Sincronizadas

Chilorio Sincronizadas recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 9 "Mocorito, The Land of ChilorioMocorito, The Land of Chilorio"
Prep Time0 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Course: Antojos
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, cheese, chilorio, flour tortillas, Quesadilla, sincronizada, tortillas
Servings: 2 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 flour tortillas homemade or store-bought
  • 1/2 cup shredded melty cheese like Asadero, quesadilla, Oaxaca, or Monterey Jack
  • 1/2 cup Sinaloa Style Chilorio
  • 1 teaspoon chilorio fat or vegetable oil
  • Ripe avocado slices to serve
  • Guacamole or salsa of your choice to serve

Instructions

  • Preheat large skillet or comal over medium-low heat for at least 5 minutes. Place two of the flour tortillas on the heated skillet or comal and top each with a 1/4 cup of the cheese and 1/4 cup of the chilorio. Place the other two flour tortillas on top, and let them heat until the cheese starts to melt and the bottom tortillas begin to gently brown. Spread chilorio fat or vegetable oil on top of each, then flip and cook for another minute.
  • Transfer to plates and serve with slices of ripe avocado and the guacamole or salsa of your choice.

Notes

Sincronizadas de Chilorio

French Fries with Chiltepín Salt and Cotija

French Fries with Chiltepín Salt and Cotija
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

French Fries with Chiltepín Salt and Cotija

French Fries with Chiltepín Salt and Cotija recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 10 “Surfside Eats”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: chiltepín chiles, cotija cheese, fries, ketchup, lime, potatoes, tartar sauce
Servings: 4 to 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • Vegetable or peanut oil for frying
  • 4 russet potatoes washed and scrubbed
  • 1 teaspoon dried chiltepín chiles
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or sea salt
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 cup grated Cotija cheese
  • Habanero Tartar Sauce or ketchup for serving

Instructions

  • Fill a large Dutch oven or casserole a little less than halfway with oil. Place over medium heat and bring to 325°F degrees — or test by dropping in a small piece of potato, if the oil bubbles all around it, it’s ready.
  • While the oil is heating up, fill a large bowl with ice water. Place a cooling rack on a baking sheet lined with paper towels. Cut the potatoes into 1/4-inch to 1/3-inch matchsticks. Add them to the ice water immediately after cutting, stirring occasionally to make sure the potatoes are not sticking to each other.
  • Remove about a quarter of the potatoes from the water. Pat dry with clean kitchen towels or paper towels. Once dry, carefully add them to the hot oil and fry for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring with tongs or a spider to make sure they aren’t sticking to each other. The fries should start to look creamy and matte in color. If they begin to brown, take them out. Transfer the fries to the baking sheet with the cooling rack and repeat the process with the remaining potatoes.
  • When all the potatoes have been fried and transferred to the baking sheet with the rack, raise the heat of the oil to 375°F to 400°F, or raise the heat under the casserole to medium-high.
  • While the oil is heating, crush the chiltepín chiles and mix with the salt, lime zest, a few cracks of black pepper, and the Cotija cheese. Set aside.
  • Once the oil is ready, add the fries back into the oil in 4 batches. Cook each batch for 3 to 4 minutes, or until the fries are golden brown. Transfer the fries back to the baking sheet with the rack.
  • If you are not going to eat immediately, keep warm in a 250°F oven. Just before serving, toss the finished fries in the cheese mixture until coated. Serve with habanero tartar sauce and/or ketchup.

Notes

Papas Fritas con Sal de Chiltepín y Queso Cotija

Chocolate Dipped Orejas

Orejas
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Chocolate Dipped Orejas

Chocolate Dipped Orejas recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 8 “El Chepe, Railway to the Past”
Prep Time25 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, Chocolate, cinnamon, cookies, pati’s mexican table, puff pastry
Servings: 40 orejas approximately
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground canela or true cinnamon
  • 1 large pinch of kosher or sea salt
  • All-purpose flour for dusting the countertop and rolling pin
  • 1 recipe Easy Homemade Puff Pastry
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate chopped, or chocolate chips
  • Rainbow sprinkles optional

Instructions

  • Place racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 425°Line 4 baking sheets with parchment paper (or cook in batches).
  • Mix the sugar, cinnamon, and salt together in a bowl.
  • Sprinkle a light coating of flour on your countertop, then spread 1 cup of the cinnamon-sugar mixture on top, right where the puff pastry will go. Place the puff pastry in the center of the cinnamon-sugar mixture. Lightly flour your rolling pin and roll the puff pastry out into a large rectangle, about 12-by-26-inches with a 1/4-inch thickness, adding a bit of flour as needed while you roll. Sprinkle the top with the remaining cinnamon-sugar mixture.
  • Mark a line horizontally across the center of the puff pastry with a knife or ruler, without cutting all the way through. Roll the bottom of the puff pastry toward the center line, creating a layered spiral. Repeat with the top of the puff pastry, rolling in toward the center line, then press both rolls towards the center. The shape should resemble a pretzel.
  • Cut in half horizontally, across the two rolls, and wrap in plastic wrap. Place in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Scrape any leftover cinnamon-sugar mixture onto a small plate.
  • Slice the chilled rolls into 1/2-inch slices. Dip both sides of slices in the remaining cinnamon-sugar mixture and place on a baking sheet, making sure to leave about an inch between the slices.
  • Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, then remove from the oven, flip the orejas, and return to the oven (swapping the baking sheet that was on top with the bottom). Bake for 10 to 12 minutes more, until both sides are golden brown. Transfer to a metal cooling rack and cool completely.
  • While the orejas are cooling, bring the heavy cream to a simmer in a small pot. Place the chocolate in a medium heatproof bowl and pour the hot cream over the chocolate. Let sit for 5 minutes, then stir until smooth. If using rainbow sprinkles, place them on a small plate.
  • Dip the tops of the orejas in the chocolate. If using rainbow sprinkles, lightly press the chocolate-dipped side into the sprinkles and return to the rack. Repeat with about half of the remaining cookies, leaving some plain, some chocolate dipped, and some dipped and with sprinkles.
  • Note: If you do not want to bake all of them at once, you may store the rolled oreja dough tightly wrapped in the refrigerator for a couple days, or freeze in a tight plastic bag for up to a month. Thaw in the refrigerator before baking.

Notes

Orejas con Chocolate

Texas Caviar

Texas Caviar
Print Recipe
5 from 6 votes

Texas Caviar

Texas Caviar recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 3 “South by South of the Border with Vivian Howard”
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Antojos, Salad, Side Dish
Cuisine: American
Keyword: black eyed peas, brown sugar, field peas, oregano, parsley, scallions, serrano chiles, Tomatoes
Servings: 4 cups
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon light brown sugar
  • 2 cups dried field peas or black eyed peas cooked, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup small-diced cocktail tomatoes plus 1/4 cup of their liquid*
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced scallions
  • 1 serrano chile stemmed and chopped
  • 2 tablespoons chopped parsley
  • 1 tablespoon chopped oregano
  • 1/4 cup olive oil

Instructions

  • In a medium bowl, gently stir together the ingredients. Serve right away, or let the caviar marinate refrigerated overnight or up to 3 days before serving. Serve at room temperature with chips, endive, celery, or as a side.
  • *Note: If you don’t have cocktail tomatoes and would still like to make this caviar, marinate 1 cup of quartered cherry tomatoes in 2 tablespoons rice vinegar, 1 teaspoon honey, 1 teaspoon lemon juice and 1/2 teaspoon salt for 30 minutes.

Notes

Courtesy Vivian Howard

Homemade Horchata

Horchata
Print Recipe
4.86 from 7 votes

Homemade Horchata

Homemade Horchata recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 6 “El Fuerte, Magic Town”
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, ceylon, cinnamon, horchata, milk, pati’s mexican table, rice
Servings: 8 1/4 cups approximately
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Mahatma® Rice white rice
  • 1 stick canela ceylon or true cinnamon, broken into pieces
  • 3 cups boiling hot water
  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup sugar

Instructions

  • Place the rice and cinnamon in a heatproof bowl and cover with the hot water. Let sit anywhere from 2 to 8 hours.
  • When ready to puree the mixture, add the milk and sugar to the rice mixture and stir well. Place in a blender, in batches, and completely puree. Strain into a pitcher as you move along. Serve over ice filled glasses and/or store in the refrigerator.

Notes

Horchata Casera

Café Horchata

Cafe Horchata
Print Recipe
5 from 6 votes

Café Horchata

Café Horchata recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 6 “El Fuerte, Magic Town”
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, ceylon, cinnamon, coffee, espresso, horchata, milk, pati’s mexican table, rice
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Pour horchata into a glass filled with the ice. Pour in the espresso, stir and drink!

Notes

Horchata con Café

Grandma Hill’s Hoecakes

Grandma Hill's Hoecakes
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Grandma Hill’s Hoecakes

Grandma Hill’s Hoecakes recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 3 “South by South of the Border with Vivian Howard”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time25 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: buttermilk, cornmeal, onion, pati’s mexican table
Servings: 12 to 16 hoecakes
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup self-rising cornmeal
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup buttermilk
  • 1/4 yellow onion diced
  • 3/4 cup water divided
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil divided

Instructions

  • If you plan to serve these within 20 minutes of cooking, preheat your oven to 200°In a medium bowl, sift together the cornmeal, salt, and sugar. Put the buttermilk and the onion in a blender and puree till it’s a homogenous liquid. Pour that plus 1/2 cup of the water into the cornmeal mixture and whisk to combine.
  • You’re looking for something akin to slightly loose pancake batter — a batter that, when you drop it into the skillet, spreads on its own, bubbles up around the edges, splatters a little. If you need to add more water to accomplish this, add the remaining water increments.
  • Heat 1 tablespoon of the oil in a 10-inch cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Spoon 2 tablespoons of batter onto the edge of the pan to form 1 corn cake. If the batter sizzles a little, the pan’s ready. Continue to drop the batter around the perimeter of the pan, finishing off with one in the middle. Make sure you get as many of them in there as you can without letting them touch. Lower your heat slightly and cook on one side for about 3 minutes. When they’re brown on the cast-iron side and little bubbles are shooting up through the center of batter, flip and cook an additional 3 minutes. Transfer the browned hoecakes to a baking sheet and hold them in the oven till you’re ready to eat. Add another tablespoon of oil and continue with the next batch.
  • If you, like my grandma, want to make these ahead and serve them a few hours later, warm them in a 375°F oven for 12-15 minutes. Do not use a microwave. The results will disappoint.

Notes

Courtesy Vivian Howard

Melon Basil Margarita

I love that my work takes me to different cities throughout the United States. And I love having a chance to meet people I’ve connected with, whether through social media or email. Sometimes they will tell me they tried some of my recipes…

The last time I went to Los Angeles, one of our producers reached out to Liz and Ramon, who have watched my show for a long time, talk me regularly on Facebook, and even made the trip all the way from Los Angeles to San Diego to come to one of my live events. They were asked if they’d like to make some of my recipes on camera, but weren’t told that I was going to be there.

So it was a great surprise when I walked in. And it was so exciting for me to see how they have made my recipes their own and are now part of their weekly meals. They had invited their family and friends and were making my Cali-Baja Fish Tacos and my Queso Fundido with homemade chorizo from Ramon’s brother. I cannot even begin to tell you how delicious that chorizo was!

In return for them welcoming us into their home and feeding me and my team, well, drinks were on me! I decided come up with a new drink to share with them, a Melon Basil Margarita. It has the fresh taste of the basil, the sweet from the honeydew melon, and the tangy lime juice you crave in a margarita.

When I took out the bottle of Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila, Ramon told me it was the drink his father-in-law offered the first time he was invited into his home. Of course, I now had to know the story of how him and Liz met… Turns out, Ramon was planning to become a priest when he saw Liz for the first time in church and fell for her. Eight months later they were engaged and gone where Ramon’s plans to be a priest.

He wasn’t invited over to his father-in-law’s for that drink, until after he took Liz to church and married her. But it just goes to show how not only dishes, but ingredients, in this case the Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila, really tie families and friends together.

You can watch all that happened in the video below…

I loved that Melon Basil Margarita so much, I’m sharing it with all of you right here. I hope you’ll grab some tequila and give it a try.

Melon Basil Margarita
Melon Basil Margarita
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Melon Basil Margarita

This Melon Basil Margarita has the fresh taste of the basil, the sweet from the honeydew melon, and the tangy lime juice you crave in a margarita.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time0 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: albahaca, basil, cocktail, honeydew, lime, Margarita, melon, tequila
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 cup Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila
  • 1 cup orange liquor
  • 1 cup maple syrup
  • 3 cups diced fresh honeydew melon
  • 8 to 10 fresh basil leaves
  • 1 to 2 jalapeños coarsely chopped, seeds on (you can add jalapeño
    to taste)
  • 1 cup ice cubes
  • Lime quarters and coarse salt to rim glasses

Instructions

  • Rim glasses with lime and salt.
  • In the jar of a blender, pour the lime juice, tequila, orange liquor, and maple syrup. Incorporate the honeydew, basil, jalapeño and a cup of ice. Puree until completely smooth.
  • Pour into prepared glasses.

Notes

Margarita de Melón con Albahaca

Hora de Celebrar! Pomegranate, Tequila, Chile y Limón

The leaves have already turned orange, yellow, red and brown here in DC meaning it’s the most celebration-packed time of year. There is Hispanic Heritage Month, Fall and Harvest celebrations, Day of the Dead, Thanksgiving, Passover, Christmas and New Years, just to mention some. I did not even include all of the year end office, school, neighborhood and friend get-togethers.

Boy did this year fly by! I’ve had no time to think about my 2019 New Years resolutions. Not that I ever follow through on them, but I used to at least think about them…

Lately, I’m telling my boys how amazed I am at how fast the time passes. When I was in middle school like Juju, I remember feeling every hour of every day pass, as if churning ice cream by hand… so slow. Coming home from school was a long awaited haul, and getting to the weekend an eternity. As I got older though, time seemed to be marked by the weeks. By college the months seemed to run into each other, only to stop and catch their breath during school breaks.

When I got married and moved to the US, I was so stunned by the change of seasons. It was their passing the baton from one to the other that seemed to mark my pace. Witnessing the seasons changing was new to me having come from Mexico City, where there seems to be one eternal season with a crazy rainy interruption.

Well, the last few years I’ve barely been able to grasp what the marks of time are and can only feel it whirling on! I blink an eye and it’s summer. I blink again, and we seem to be speeding like mad to wrap up the year. I swear the entire year feels like what an hour used to feel like when I was Juju’s age. No surprise then, the faster the years seem to go, the more I want to celebrate anything and everything.

For us Mexicans, celebrating means having tequila around. We even joke about it. You got a promotion at work? Come over for some tequila! You are getting married? Do you have enough tequila?!? You have a dinner at home and are having me over? Can’t show up without your favorite tequila because, frankly, you probably don’t have enough.

Aside from sipping it neat, I love coming up with one new and fabulous cocktail every year to mark our holidays. It has become a trendy thing around here and now my friends expect it. So this year, this is the one. I was daring and bold and it paid off. I call it Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón and it is a delight! And it’s very easy to make. You could even make it ahead of time, too.

I start off with a flavored simple syrup. Many people seem baffled when they hear the term simple syrup. Mixologist jargon for sure, it sounds like something complex to prepare or something you get at a hard to find specialty store. But simple syrup is nothing more than sugar dissolved in water! And you can flavor it any way you want. For this cocktail, I flavor it with whole allspice berries, true cinnamon also known as canela, a whole clove, and the rind of a lemon. It makes for a simple syrup that is fragrant, citrusy, lightly spiced up, and has warm comforting tones from the canela. The more you let the simple syrup sit and become infused, the more the lemon rind will also absorb the simple syrup and become candied. Then it is a treat of a garnish to bite into as you sip your cocktail.

Once you have the spiced up simple syrup, you blend it with the lively and tart pomegranate juice, an entire fresh and grassy jalapeño – do not remove the seeds please – and fresh squeezed lemon juice. For the tequila, I use Gran Centenario Reposado, which is mildly fruity and teasingly sweet. It has a woody fragrance, and you can taste an echo of almond and vanilla in it that compliments the syrup and the pomegranate. They have a page on Facebook and Instagram, if you want to know more about them.

This Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón cocktail is so multilayered and irresistible it’s never an afterthought. You want to savor every single sip. It will claim its delicious place at center stage of your celebration.

spiced up pomegranate cocktail

Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón Cocktail
Print Recipe
4.25 from 4 votes

Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón Cocktail

This Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón cocktail is so multilayered and irresistible it’s never an afterthought. You want to savor every single sip. It will claim its delicious place at center stage of your celebration.
Prep Time15 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, lime, pomegranate, tequila
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 4 allspice berries
  • 1/2 stick (about a 1” piece) true cinnamon or canela
  • 1 whole clove
  • Rind of a lemon plus a quarter of the lemon to rim the glasses
  • 3/4 cup Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 1 1/2 cups pomegranate juice
  • 3/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 fresh jalapeño stemmed (seeding optional) more to taste
  • 2 cups ice
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground true cinnamon or canela

Instructions

  • In a small saucepan, combine the granulated sugar, water, allspice berries, cinnamon, whole clove and lemon rind. Set over medium heat and let the sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally for 3 to 4 minutes, until you cannot see the sugar granules anymore.
  • Remove from the heat. Let it steep anywhere from 30 minutes to 12 hours. When ready to use, strain the spiced syrup into a small bowl or measuring cup. Reserve the lemon peel and cut it into 6 pieces.
  • In the jar of a blender, add the tequila, pomegranate juice, lemon juice, jalapeño and strained spiced syrup. Puree until completely smooth. Add the ice and puree again.
  • On a small plate, combine the turbinado sugar, salt and ground cinnamon. Rub the top of 6 glasses with a quarter lemon or water and rim with the sugar mixture. Fill each glass with the pomegranate drink, garnish each with one piece of the sweetened lemon peel, and serve!

Notes

Coctel Picosito de Granada, Chile y Limón

Sardine Empanadas

Sardine Empanadas
Print Recipe
4.15 from 7 votes

Sardine Empanadas

Sardine Empanadas from Pati's Mexican Table, Season 7, Episode 7 "La Paz: The Heart of Baja Sur"
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time1 hr
Course: Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Empanadas, fish, pati's mexican table, sardines
Servings: 20 Empanadas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 pound frozen puff pastry
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup white onion chopped
  • 2 cups white button mushrooms cleaned and diced 8 ounces
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 cup ripe Roma tomatoes chopped about 1/2 pound
  • 1/2 cup manzanilla olives stuffed with pimientos chopped
  • 1/4 cup pickled jalapeños chopped
  • 2 cans (3-4 ounces) of sardines in oil broken into chunks
  • 2 eggs separated
  • All-purpose flour for rolling out puff pastry

Instructions

  • Remove the puff pastry from the freezer and let it thaw on your countertop.
  • Heat the oil in a medium casserole or a sauté pan set over medium heat. Once hot, cook the onion for 3 to 4 minutes until it softens. Incorporate the mushrooms, sprinkle in the salt and pepper, and cook for another 5 to 6 minutes, until the juices come out and they begin to dry out, and the mushrooms start browning a bit. Add the tomatoes and cook for 6 to 7 minutes, until they start breaking down and becoming mushy and soft. Add the olives and jalapeños, mix well, and cook for another minute.
  • Remove from the heat, add the sardines, combine well and set aside.
  • Separate the egg whites from the egg yolks in two small bowls. Use a fork or a whisk to beat them separately.
  • Place the racks in the lower and upper thirds of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a couple of baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • Lightly sprinkle flour on the countertop and rub some on the rolling pin. Roll out the puff pastry to thinner than 1/4-inch and use a 4-to-5-inch round mold to cut circles. Add a generous tablespoon of the sardine filling in the middle of each round. Brush a bit of the beaten egg white around the edges each round. Fold each one into a half moon shape and press the sides.
  • Using a fork, press the side of the empanada to help seal and decorate it. Brush the egg yolk on top of the empanadas and place them on the prepared baking sheets. Place the empanadas in the oven. Bake anywhere from 20 to 22 minutes, until the tops of the empanadas have puffed and are a shiny golden brown.

Notes

Empanadas de Sardina 

Mary-Mex Crab Dip

Mary-Mex Crab Dip
Print Recipe
4.25 from 4 votes

Mary-Mex Crab Dip

Mary-Mex Crab Dip, from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 13 "Mex’d Up American Regional Favorites"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time35 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Appetizer, Snack
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, chiles toreados, cotija cheese, crab, dip, Recipe, seafood
Servings: 6 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Mexican crema
  • 1/4 cup mayonnaise
  • 1/2 cup crumbled Cotija cheese divided
  • 1/2 cup shredded Muenster cheese
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 3 tablespoons chiles toreados chopped and drained
  • 1 pound jumbo lump crab meat picked through to remove any shells
  • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
  • Crackers, crostini, or chips for serving

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • In a medium bowl, stir together the crema, mayonnaise, ¼ cup of Cotija cheese, Muenster cheese, lime juice, Worcestershire and cayenne until combined.
  • Fold in the chiles, crab meat, and the white and light green parts of the scallions (reserve the rest for garnish), being careful not to break the crab up too much.
  • Transfer the mixture to an oven safe dish. Sprinkle remaining Cotija cheese on the top. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until it is bubbly and golden brown. Sprinkle on the reserved scallions. Serve with crostini, crackers or chips.

Notes

Dip de Cangrejo Mary-Mex

Story Goes… Governor Shrimp Tacos

The story goes, governor shrimp tacos, or tacos gobernador de camarón, were created in the state of Sinaloa in the early 1990s to surprise governor Francisco Labastida Ochoa, after he told a few friends how much he loved his wife’s shrimp tacos. That bit of information was passed on to the owners of Los Arcos in Mazatlán restaurant, before he headed there to visit.

The chef was given the quest not only try to match the governor’s wife’s tacos, which no one besides the governor had tried, but to beat them. So quite a few taco recipes were developed and tested. When the governor showed up to eat, he liked them so much he named them “tacos gobernador.”

Now, I do not know if that story is entirely true. But, what I do know is, these tacos became so popular you no longer only find them at Los Arcos in Mazatlán. They are all over Sinaloa and beyond. I had them as far away as Los Angeles and Miami.  Yet, I saw the most renditions on the 800 mile drive throughout the entire Baja Peninsula.

I felt more than obliged to offer my take on tacos gobernador, since my travels in Baja are featured on “Pati’s Mexican Table” in my new season premiering in a few weeks (you can watch the trailer here). And I am thrilled to share my recipe with you, as we all love these tacos in my home!

So what’s in tacos gobernador? First, a combination of shrimp and cheese makes them a cross between a taco and a quesadilla. A ton of cheese is really essential.

Second, cooked onion that is often accompanied by other vegetables, typically bell peppers and sometimes poblano chiles. If you ask me what I prefer, hands down, not even a second of hesitation, poblano chiles. I absolutely adore them. I feel lukewarm about green bell peppers to put it mildly. So my take has a combination of slivered onions and poblanos with just a bit of tomato.

Third, the seasonings. Some renditions have no sauce, only salt and pepper. Some have a simple to a more seasoned tomato sauce. I go for a seasoned, very thick sauce that is almost a paste, really. It combines tomato paste, La Costeña chipotles in adobo and the W sauce — Worcestershire — or as we call it in Mexico “salsa inglesa.”

Lastly, you can opt for corn or flour tortillas. There are no strict guidelines here, different from other kinds of tacos.

There are so many reasons why I like these tacos so much. They end up being a complete meal, they are so easy to prepare, they are irresistibly delicious and messy, the cheese creates an inviting crust as it melts… and they have a great story behind them. I do love a good story.

Governor Shrimp Tacos
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Governor Shrimp Tacos

Governor Shrimp Tacos recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 1 "Tijuana’s Culinary Revolution" 
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Antojo, Mexican, pati’s mexican table, Shrimp, Sinaloa, Taco
Servings: 6 Tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 1/2 white onion slivered
  • 2 poblano chiles stemmed, seeded, slivered
  • 5 garlic cloves finely chopped
  • 2 ripe Roma tomatoes cored, seeded, slivered
  • 3 tablespoons sauce from chipotles in adobo
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper or to taste
  • 1 1/2 pounds (about 11-15) shelled large shrimp cut into large chunks
  • 3 cups shredded Oaxaca, mozzarella, asadero or Muenster cheese
  • 6 to 8 flour or corn tortillas
  • Sliced avocado for garnish
  • 1 Chile Manzano sliced and mixed with the juice of a lime, 1/4 red onion and salt to taste

Instructions

  • Heat the butter in a large nonstick skillet set over medium-high heat. Once it melts and begins to bubble, add the onion and poblano and cook until wilted, about 3 minutes. Add the garlic, stir, and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Incorporate the tomatoes, cook for a minute, and as they begin to soften, add the sauce from the chipotles in adobo, tomato paste, Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper. Stir well, cook for another minute, then add the shrimp and cook just until they change color, about 1 to 2 minutes. Turn off heat and scrape into a bowl to prevent the shrimp from overcooking.
  • On a preheated comal set over low heat, heat the tortillas on both sides for a minute. Add about 1/2 cup of shredded cheese onto each one. Once the cheese begins to melt, add a generous amount of the shrimp mixture, fold in half and continue heating until cheese has completely melted and the tortillas have begun to lightly brown and create a crust.
  • Serve with sliced avocado and Manzano chiles and onion.

Video

Notes

Tacos Gobernador de Camarón

Sopes

The very first class I taught at the Mexican Cultural Institute, after I switched from being a policy analyst at the Inter American Dialogue, was October 18, 2007.

I remember the date exactly, because it was a day after Sami’s 6th birthday. For months, I had been teaching him and his two brothers, Alan who was then 8 and Juju who was just 1, how to make sopes every night for at least 3 months.

I had been so nervous about teaching in front of a live audience that, instead of telling them our usual bed time story about an imaginary and mischievous monkey called Waba-Waba, I had switched to a nightly cooking demo. They were as loving and kind and patient as they are with me to this day, did not complain, and pretended to be making sopes along with me.

I started the classes at the Institute in an attempt to share my love for Mexican cuisine and culture and to try to open a much wider window into its richness, diversity and surprising accessibility. I wanted to help break misconceptions about our food and our people and invite people north of the border to make use of our ingredients, techniques and recipes to enrich their own kitchens.

The very first dish that I shared was sopes. I even found a photo of that day… and you can see Rosa and I showing how to make sopes many ways, with our hands, using a rolling pin, with a tortilla press…

Pati and Rosa making sopes at the Mexican Cultural Institute

Why did I choose sopes? To begin with, because they are one of my favorite things to eat! But also, because sopes helped me shine a light on so many crucial elements of Mexican cuisine…

Sopes are part of a category of dishes we Mexicans call antojos, or antojitos, which translates to little cravings. An antojo is something you can eat anytime of day and can either be a quick bite or make a full meal, depending on what you top them with… and how many you eat.

Sopes are made of corn masa, which is a cornerstone of Mexican cuisine that has existed for thousands of years. Made of nixtamalized corn, corn masa renders corn nutritious and versatile. You don’t need to nixtamalize corn yourself, you can buy masa harina, which simply mixed with water makes masa!

Sopes show how playful and versatile masa can be. They are similar to a tortilla, but they are much thicker, and the rim around it that helps contain its garnishes. They are like little edible plates.

Sopes are easy to make. Different from a corn tortilla, someone who is making sopes for the first time, doesn’t need to worry about knowing how to use a tortilla press, the correct thickness, or the technique for making them puff up. They are much more forgiving.

Sopes are also accessible: you can make them ahead of time, vary the toppings, assemble in a few minutes, dress them up or dress them down. I always, always, add a layer of refried beans, a tasty salsa and either tangy, salty and crumbly queso cotija or queso fresco, crumbled on top.

To boot, sopes are super fun to make by yourself or with friends or with your kids.

So as you can see, sopes helped me achieve many things: they helped me show how accessible, forgiving, fun, filling, nutritious, versatile, rich and delicious Mexican food is.

You can follow along with this video too…

To this day, I am still proudly teaching at the Institute where I am the resident chef 11 years after I started. I am also serving sopes any chance I get.

Pati Jinich sopes
Print Recipe
3.8 from 5 votes

Sopes

Sopes recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 10 "How I Got to Now"
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time8 mins
Total Time18 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cotija, queso fresco, refried beans, sopes, Tomatillo Salsita
Servings: 12 sopes
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

To make the Sopes:

  • 2 cups masa harina or corn tortilla flour such as Maseca
  • 2 cups water more if needed
  • Pinch kosher or coarse sea salt

To serve:

Instructions

  • Heat a comal or skillet over medium heat until very hot.

To make the sopes:

  • Combine the masa harina, water and salt, kneading in a revolving motion with your hands. Knead for a couple of minutes, until dough is smooth and has no lumps. If it feels too dry, add a bit more water.
  • Divide the dough into 12 balls, each about 2-inches in diameter. Line the bottom of a tortilla press with circles cut from a thin plastic bag (like the ones from the produce section of your grocery store). One at a time, place a ball of dough onto the plastic lining the bottom of the tortilla press, and top with another layer of plastic. Press down to make a flat disk as thick as a pancake, about 1/4-inch thick (much thicker than a tortilla). You can also flatten and form them by hand. Repeat with all 12 balls.
  • As you make them, place each sope on the hot comal or skillet. Let them cook about one to two minutes on each side, until opaque and speckled, and they can be flipped without sticking.
  • Take them off the comal and place them on a chopping board. Using a kitchen towel to protect your fingers, make a rim around each sope by pressing and pinching with your fingers along the edges. Return them to the comal or skillet, and let them cook for one or two more minutes per side, until thoroughly cooked.
  • If eaten the same day, they may be kept wrapped in a clean kitchen towel. If not, wrap them in a kitchen towel or paper towel, and store inside a closed plastic bag in the refrigerator. They will keep for up to 3 days, afterwards they will turn too hard. Reheat on hot comal or skillet for a couple minutes before eating. They can also be frozen and kept for months.

To serve:

  • Once the sopes have been thoroughly cooked and warmed, place on a platter and add a generous tablespoon of refried beans, shredded lettuce, crumbled cheese, chopped onion and Quick Roasted Salsita. Salsa may be left on the side for people to add as much as they like.

Scallop Aguachile at the James Beard House

Mexican cuisine is riding such a high wave these days.

Compared to when I first moved to the US, 20 years ago, you can now find all the ingredients you need to prepare Mexican food. People are not only eating Mexican food out, but are bringing it into their home kitchens. There’s the #tacotuesday and the #taconight. Wherever you travel to in the US, there’s Mexican food to be found in airports, restaurants, hotels, fast food chains, and the offerings continue to increase and get better. It seems like the more people get to know Mexican cuisine, the more they want to taste it, to cook it, to explore its depth.

It is such a thrill to be part of this movement. I particularly enjoy traveling through the US to cook whenever I get an invitation. And I was beyond ecstatic when I got the request from the James Beard House in New York City to whip up their Cinco de Mayo dinner. What an honor! But of course, the pressure was on. What theme, which menu, what drinks? So much to share!

To be sure, Cinco de Mayo is not a big celebration in Mexico. It is a somber occasion honored in the state of Puebla, where the Cinco de Mayo Battle took place in 1862. It was a battle between a small Mexican militia against a big French army, and while the Mexicans won, with the odds stacked against them, the French won right back. Yet, move the clock forward a few years and Mexico regained its Independence.

Now, for whatever reason, which many have unsuccessfully tried to explain, Cinco has become the biggest Mexican-themed party abroad. I was bewildered at first when I started getting invites to Cinco de Mayo parties from our American friends. But then, of course, happily joined the excitement of the Cinco train. Listen, if there is an open door to celebrate anything and everything that we love and are proud of about Mexico, and share our food, cuisine and culture: count me in!

menu from the dinner at the James Beard House

Photo courtesy Clay Williams (@ultraclay)

As a Mexican immigrant, to be invited to the James Beard House, such a prestigious place and institution, made me feel proud and like my food is worth it. But, it also made me feel like Mexican food has really started to earn its rightful place in the eyes of the culinary world of the US.

You can see the menu above. Because I really couldn’t choose a Mexican region to focus on, I opted for what I called a Mexican culinary compass: different foods from different places from Mexico, a few childhood favorites, and a couple new dishes from my kitchen. Carnitas from Michoacán, caldo de camarón from Acapulco, gorditas from Oaxaca…

The first course of the formal sit-down dinner menu, after the cocktail hour, was a scallop aguachile inspired by the coastal region of the Sea of Cortez.

The team from the James Beard House is a joy to work with. We prepped the day before, as it was a long menu! Then my production team and I got so excited with the occasion that we decided to make it part of an episode of the next season of Pati’s Mexican Table, which will premiere in September 2018.

Pati Jinich plating her classic scallop aguachile at the James Beard House

Photo courtesy Clay Williams (@ultraclay)

But meanwhile, I leave you with the scallop aguachile recipe. It is SO GOOD. And it could not be simpler. It helps break so many myths about Mexican food. Not all Mexican food is fried, or laborious, or covered in cheese, or severely spiced up, or takes forever to prepare. In fact, most Mexican food is healthy, soulful, delicious, nutritious. It gives beautiful ingredients, like the plump, silky and sweet fresh sea scallops a chance to shine by just dressing them beautifully, lightly and kindly.

scallop aguachile

Photo courtesy Clay Williams (@ultraclay)

Mexican cuisine is indeed riding such a high wave today. And I can see the high tide ahead, with the wave getting even bigger and higher. So excited and honored to have the possibility to continue to ride it and bring the fruits of this journey to your shore.

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4.8 from 5 votes

Scallop Aguachile

The first course from Pati's Cinco de Mayo dinner at the James Beard House in New York was a scallop aguachile inspired by the Mexican coastal region of the Sea of Cortez.
Prep Time15 mins
Resting Time15 mins
Course: Appetizer
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Aguachile, Ceviche, jalapeno, lime, Scallops
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 pound large fresh scallops
  • 1/4 cup lime juice freshly squeezed
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/4 cup red onion slivered
  • 1 serrano or jalapeño chile thinly sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or more to taste

Instructions

  • In a bowl, combine the lime juice, olive oil, onion, serrano and salt. Whisk and let sit for at least 15 minutes, or cover and refrigerate up to 12 hours.
  • When ready to serve, remove lime juice mix from the refrigerator. Slice the fresh scallops thinly and horizontally, up to 1/8” width. Spread on a platter. Whisk the lime juice sauce and pour in its entirety over the scallops, arranging so that the onion and chile are spread evenly throughout. Serve immediately.

Notes

Aguachile de Callo de Hacha

Sardine Empanadas

What to do with a couple cans of sardines? Do what the people from landlocked Aguascalientes do: make the tastiest empanadas.

Over the past dozen years, I have been amazed by so many things, as I’ve ventured into a deep exploration of Mexico’s cuisine to share it with the world – or whoever will listen. Its richness, its diversity, its depth, its accessibility, its generosity… One thing that has also stood out, everywhere, is the resourcefulness of its people.

You know the saying, if all you have are lemons, make lemonade. That exponentially applies to the Mexican spirit.

Take the state of Nuevo Leon that is so rich in oranges. You will find everything from orange cake, orange cookies, orange drinks, orange chicken, orange candy, to amazing orange preserves.

Aguascalientes is a place deeply inland, with no water outside its borders and no water within its borders – no lakes, no rivers. Bien tierra adentro, as we say. Historically, the only fish and seafood that has been available there, for the most part, is that which can be preserved: salted, dried, pickled, or canned. Hence, these sardine empanadas, a dish that truly embellishes the sardines.

I was intrigued when I stumbled upon this recipe as a specialty of the region. It jumped out at me like a jack-in-the-box screaming: test me please! See, I inherited a deep taste for sardines. A funny ingredient to dig, I know. Pretty basic and not much glamour about them…

Oh, but it’s the lightly salty, oily, peculiar rich taste and kind of pasty consistency to them that I grew to appreciate from two men I love. My father, whose favorite torta – and he is a heck of a torta maker – has sardines, avocado, onion and pickled jalapeños. And my grandfather, my father’s father, who was an angel that happened to land on earth – ok, fine, he was a Polish man fleeing persecution, who found refuge in Mexico when he was merely a teen – loved eating sardines on saltine crackers smeared with butter.

Pati with her Grandpa
With my grandfather, like 25 years ago…

Turns out, you really only need basic ingredients to make these empanadas. And they end up gorgeous, inside and out.

Here is a bird’s eye view of the empanadas.

sardine empanadas

You know why they have such deep and shimmering golden brown color on the top? Because in Aguascalientes, they brush the empanadas with only the egg yolks. No worries, you won’t waste the egg whites. You can use them to help seal the inner seam of the empanada.

As far as the filling: Sardines are combined with mushrooms that are seasoned and browned over softened onions and mixed with mushy cooked tomatoes, olives and pickled jalapeños. The sardine flavor is nuanced by the combination, yet not hidden. It is embellished in a way.

The mushrooms are a non-competing companion that makes the filling more substantial and adds a nice soft bite. The puff pastry becomes the perfect wrapping to envelop the savory, lightly spicy, teasingly rich mixture.

Ok, here is an inside photo, so you can see the chunky and moist filling too.

sardine empanadas

You can make them for lunch or dinner and eat them with a green salad on the side. You can also make them mini and have them as appetizers. You can eat them hot, right out of the oven. Or you can eat them at room temperature. And you know I am going to say this: they are actually also delicious cold.

The best thing is, if you have leftovers, everyone will have a delicious to-go lunch for school or work.

Sardine Empanadas
Print Recipe
4.15 from 7 votes

Sardine Empanadas

Sardine Empanadas from Pati's Mexican Table, Season 7, Episode 7 "La Paz: The Heart of Baja Sur"
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time1 hr
Course: Snack
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Empanadas, fish, pati’s mexican table, sardines
Servings: 20 Empanadas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 pound frozen puff pastry
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup white onion chopped
  • 2 cups white button mushrooms cleaned and diced 8 ounces
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1 cup ripe Roma tomatoes chopped about 1/2 pound
  • 1/2 cup manzanilla olives stuffed with pimientos chopped
  • 1/4 cup pickled jalapeños chopped
  • 2 cans (3-4 ounces) of sardines in oil broken into chunks
  • 2 eggs separated
  • All-purpose flour for rolling out puff pastry

Instructions

  • Remove the puff pastry from the freezer and let it thaw on your countertop.
  • Heat the oil in a medium casserole or a sauté pan set over medium heat. Once hot, cook the onion for 3 to 4 minutes until it softens. Incorporate the mushrooms, sprinkle in the salt and pepper, and cook for another 5 to 6 minutes, until the juices come out and they begin to dry out, and the mushrooms start browning a bit. Add the tomatoes and cook for 6 to 7 minutes, until they start breaking down and becoming mushy and soft. Add the olives and jalapeños, mix well, and cook for another minute.
  • Remove from the heat, add the sardines, combine well and set aside.
  • Separate the egg whites from the egg yolks in two small bowls. Use a fork or a whisk to beat them separately.
  • Place the racks in the lower and upper thirds of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit. Line a couple of baking sheets with parchment paper.
  • Lightly sprinkle flour on the countertop and rub some on the rolling pin. Roll out the puff pastry to thinner than 1/4-inch and use a 4-to-5-inch round mold to cut circles. Add a generous tablespoon of the sardine filling in the middle of each round. Brush a bit of the beaten egg white around the edges each round. Fold each one into a half moon shape and press the sides.
  • Using a fork, press the side of the empanada to help seal and decorate it. Brush the egg yolk on top of the empanadas and place them on the prepared baking sheets. Place the empanadas in the oven. Bake anywhere from 20 to 22 minutes, until the tops of the empanadas have puffed and are a shiny golden brown.

Notes

Empanadas de Sardina 

Twice Spiced Deviled Eggs

I don’t know if I have shared this with you before, but I am obsessed with eggs. I just love them. In fact, many of my favorite childhood memories have eggs in them.

Like sitting next to my mom before she left for work, so many mornings, as she ate her usual scrambled eggs with ham, always cooked until tender, along with a piece of black toast with a thin spread of honey.

Like when my dad taught me how to crack a soft boiled egg, using a coffee spoon in such a way as to impeccably remove the top, revealing the still runny yolk that seemed to be waiting for soft butter and a sprinkle of salt to be mixed in. Then, he rushed to dip a piece of toast in the hot yolk and gave me the first bite.

Like the very first time my mom obliged my plea to let me cook and commissioned me to make the Sunday brunch scrambled eggs. She gave me the eggs. The bowl. The pan. The butter. The salt that she took from the spice cupboard and left it open. Temptation was too hard to resist, and I added more than a dash of every bottle in it. Bright red paprika, beautiful star anise, deep yellow cumin, fragrant crumbled cinnamon, and on and on… You know how those eggs turned out. Since then, I have tried to tame my enthusiasm when cooking.

I find eggs to be one of the most fascinating ingredients. They are affordable. They are beautiful. They are accessible. They are versatile, too, and can be eaten for any meal of the day, any time of day, taken for a sweet or savory spin, taking center stage or as a crucial ingredient. To boot, they are, along with milk and seeds, amongst the most nutritious foods on earth. Oh, and if that wasn’t enough, they can be used for so many purposes aside from being eaten as eggs: they can act as a binding ingredient (think meatballs), as a thickener (such as in chocolate mousse), as a volume booster (like in a soufflé!) or as the medium that makes other ingredients shine (like in a frittata or omelet).

It is no surprise then that I have a hard time starting my day without eggs. My most common quick breakfast is, like my mom, scrambled eggs with ham. Followed by Huevos a la Mexicana, sometimes straight and sometimes adding crunchy green beans, slightly sweet diced zucchini or thinly sliced woody mushrooms. I can’t resist huevos ahogados or drunken in one or another salsa, like salsa verde, martajada or in a chunky tomato and poblano rajas salsa. Enchiladas stuffed with one or another kind of scrambled eggs for a sumptuous brunch are king for when you have guests. Any form eggs can take for a morning concoction, such as breakfast crepes, tortas, sandwiches or tacos, I will eat them up.

OK: getting to the point of this post. I love eggs so very much that the fact that there is something such as deviled eggs makes me beyond ecstatic. One of the best ways to honor the egg that can be eaten post breakfast and is so pretty, tasty and a classic finger food.

If there are deviled eggs on a menu, you know I am ordering some. If there is a tray being passed around at a cocktail hour or party, you know who that crazy woman is trailing the deviled egg tray.

Here is my version: I called them Twice Spiced, as they benefit from two of my favorite spicy Mexican condiments: Chipotles in adobo sauce and pickled jalapeños. You know you have nowhere else to go than to the kitchen to whip some up.

Print Recipe
4.84 from 6 votes

Twice Spiced Deviled Eggs

My version of deviled eggs: I called them Twice Spiced, as they benefit from two of my favorite spicy Mexican condiments - Chipotles in adobo sauce and pickled jalapeños.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Appetizer, Hors d'oeuvre, Snack
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: bacon, Chipotle, Deviled, Eggs, jalapeno
Servings: 16 halves
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 8 eggs
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons Mexican crema
  • 1/2 teaspoon dijon mustard
  • 2 teaspoons sauce from chipotles in adobo sauce
  • 2 teaspoons pickling vinegar from pickled jalapeños
  • 2 teaspoons white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter
  • 1 scallion white and light green parts sliced
  • 1/2 teaspoon sugar
  • 3 bacon slices cooked until crisp and finely minced
  • Pickled jalapeños sliced or diced, for garnish

Instructions

  • Place the eggs in a saucepan and cover them with water by a couple inches. Bring to a boil over medium high heat. Let the water boil for a minute, turn off the heat, cover and let the eggs steep for 9 to 10 minutes. Remove the eggs from the water and let cool. Once they are cool enough to handle, peel and place on a chopping board. Using a sharp knife, slice each egg in half vertically.
  • With a spoon, remove the yolks and place them in a food processor. Along with the yolks, add the mayonnaise, crema, mustard, chipotles in adobo sauce, pickling vinegar from pickled jalapeños, white vinegar, unsalted butter, scallion and sugar. Process until completely smooth and fluffy. Give it a full minute of your time.
  • Place the egg yolk mixture in a pastry tube or use a plastic or piping bag. I like to use the star tip, but you can use a tip with whichever shape you like - you can also use a teaspoon. Add some of the minced bacon at the bottom of each white half. Pipe or spoon the egg yolk mixture on top. Garnish with the jalapeños and serve.

Notes

Huevos Rellenos Doblemente Sazonados

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tamales

Just when you think you completely understand something, life proves you wrong. Does that happen to you? It happens to me all the time, especially when it comes to food.

A cuisine as rich and diverse as Mexico’s needs for us to make an effort to preserve what has been passed on. But, you also have to keep an open mind to new ideas that may in turn become classics.

In that sense, I find the kitchen to be one of the most humbling places because food is always growing and evolving and taking you along, if you let it. You get to constantly learn, apply what you learn, share it, and then start all over again.

Take tamales for example. I have made countless kinds from all regions of Mexico and from different historical times. I have wrapped them in dried and fresh corn husks, banana leaves, hoja santa leaves…practically any and every edible leaf I know of in Mexico. I have learned to make them with raw masa, with masa colada, with rice flour masa, with normal wheat flour masa and even with no masa! I have done savory and sweet, with fillings that range from picadillo to marzipan and beyond. You name it, I have probably tried it.

I thought I had the tamales from the city of Oaxaca nailed down. Then, a few months ago, as we were filming Season 6 of Pati’s Mexican Table there, I was amazed to try a new tamal at Criollo, Chef Luis Arellano’s new restaurant. Its masa was made with pumpkin and filled with sweet refried beans laced with piloncillo. The only way to describe it is brilliant!

Back in my kitchen, I was inspired by the possibility of not only flavoring the masa, but enriching it with a starchy vegetable to lend taste, consistency and color. I came up with this sweet potato tamal filled with savory refried beans.

When the time came to test and play around with it, I was reminded of how important it is to appreciate the lessons that have stood the test of time. In the case of tamales: to review our technique for steaming, for assembling, for achieving a good masa. So we can still call our new creation something worthy of the name TAMAL.

Given the addition of the starchy sweet potatoes, I ended up having to test the idea quite a few times to achieve a very fluffy, yet tasty masa.

In the end, I am very happy with this one! The masa is puffy and moist, and its barely sweet flavor contrasts nicely with the savory, earthy taste of the refried beans. I also took the liberty of drizzling them with crema and topping with salty queso fresco.

And, because my friends from FUD USA and I want to hear what your favorite tamales are, and mostly, we want you to be able to make them for the holidays, we’re giving away 5 tamaleras and each with a copy of my cookbook. Are you in? Go right here to enter.

Pati Jinich sweet potato black bean tamales
Print Recipe
5 from 5 votes

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tamales

I thought I had the tamales from the city of Oaxaca nailed down. Then, a few months ago, as we were filming Season 6 of Pati’s Mexican Table there, I was amazed to try a new tamal at Criollo, Chef Luis Arellano’s new restaurant. Its masa was made with pumpkin and filled with sweet refried beans laced with piloncillo. The only way to describe it is brilliant! Back in my kitchen, I was inspired by the possibility of not only flavoring the masa, but enriching it with a starchy vegetable to lend taste, consistency and color. I came up with this sweet potato tamal filled with savory refried beans.
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time55 mins
Total Time2 hrs 25 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: black beans, pati's mexican table, queso fresco, sweet potato, Tamales
Servings: 12 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds sweet potatoes
  • 1 cup lard or vegetable shortening
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 2/3 cups corn masa flour or masa harina (such as Maseca)
  • 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable broth
  • 24 dried corn husks
  • 2 cups refried beans
  • 1 cup Mexican crema
  • 1 cup queso fresco crumbled

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Wrap the sweet potatoes in aluminum foil. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes or until completely cooked and soft. Remove from the oven. When cool enough to handle, cut open and scoop out the cooked pulp into a bowl. Set aside to cool.

To make the tamal masa:

  • Place the lard or vegetable shortening and 1/2 teaspoon of salt into a mixer, and beat over medium speed until very light, about 1 minute. Reduce speed to low, add baking powder and sugar, and take turns adding the corn masa flour and the broth. Raise speed back to medium and continue beating another 6 to 7 minutes, until the dough is homogeneous. In batches, add the cooled sweet potato pulp and continue beating for another 5 to 6 minutes, until the masa looks fluffed up.

To assemble the tamales:

  • Soak the dried corn husks in hot water for a couple minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. Lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. Spread about 1/3 cup masa into about a 2” to 3” square, the layer should be about 1/4” thick, leaving a border of at least 1/2” on the sides. Place about 2 teaspoons of refried beans in the middle of the masa square.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa starts to swaddle the filling) and fold them to one side, rolling them in same direction around tamal. Fold up the empty section of the husk with the tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open. Gently squeeze from the bottom to the top to even the filling out without pressing to hard. As you assemble all the tamales, place them as upright as you can in a container.

To prepare the tamalera or steamer:

  • Place water in the bottom pan of a steamer, so that water is under the steamer basket or rack, and bring it to a simmer. Line the steamer with one or two layers of soaked corn husks.

To cook the tamales:

  • When you have all tamales ready, place them as vertically as you can, into the prepared steamer with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, and steam covered with a lid for 55 minutes to an hour. You know the tamales are ready when they come easily free from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks – you will see the moisture, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead several days before and stored in refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.
  • You can serve with a spoonful of Mexican crema and crumbled queso fresco on top.

Notes

Tamales de Camote con Frijol

Chipotle Goat Cheese Spread

Pati Jinich chipotle goat cheese spread
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