Drinks

Frozen Tequila Piña Colada

Frozen Tequila Pina Colada
Print Recipe
4.6 from 5 votes

Frozen Tequila Piña Colada

My take on a Piña Colada. Being Mexican, I opted for Reposado tequila over rum and since I like it super smooth and creamy, I use coconut gelato.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: lime, pineapple, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 2-ounce scoops coconut gelato or sorbet
  • ½ cup frozen pineapple
  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 1 ounce pineapple juice
  • 1 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • ½ cup ice
  • 2 to 3 pieces candied pineapple on a skewer to garnish, optional
  • Flaky sea salt optional

Instructions

  • Put the gelato, frozen pineapple, tequila, pineapple juice, and lime juice in the blender and puree until smooth. Add the ½ cup of ice and pulse until desired consistency. Pour into a chilled glass. Garnish with candied pineapple on a skewer and a sprinkle with the sea salt, if desired.

Notes

Piña Colada con Tequila

Tequila Sunrise Spritz

Tequila Sunrise Spritz
Print Recipe
4.75 from 4 votes

Tequila Sunrise Spritz

A fizzy twist on the world-famous Tequila Sunrise, which I call a Tequila Sunrise Spritz because it’s topped off with sparkling white wine.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: lime, orange juice, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 3 ounces fresh squeezed orange juice
  • 1/2 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 ounce Aperol
  • 2 ounces Prosecco or any white sparkling wine
  • Splash seltzer water

Instructions

  • In a mixing glass, add the tequila, orange juice, and lime juice and stir to combine. Add ice to a tall chilled glass, such as a highball glass, and pour in the Aperol. Follow with the tequila mixture, and top with the Prosecco and a splash of seltzer.

Lime Paleta Charro Negro

Charro Negro with Lime Paleta
Print Recipe
2.75 from 4 votes

Lime Paleta Charro Negro

The name Charro Negro references the beautiful black suits that the Mexican horsemen or “charros” wear, and it’s made with Mexican cola, fresh lime juice, and tequila. I garnish it with a lime paleta that you can bite into at the end.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: lime, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Plata Tequila
  • 1/2 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • Mexican Cola to top
  • Lime paleta for garnish

Instructions

  • Add tequila and lime juice to a glass, stir, and top with Mexican Cola. Insert the lime paleta and serve. Eat the paleta as you sip the drink!

Notes

Charro Negro con Paleta de Limón

Tangerine Chile Gran Paloma

Tangerine Chile Gran Paloma
Print Recipe
3.6 from 5 votes

Tangerine Chile Gran Paloma

The Paloma is one of Mexico’s favorite ways to drink tequila, and I put my own spin on it using tangerine and a chile de árbol infused agave syrup.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: agave syrup, chile de arbol, tangerine, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the chile de árbol agave syrup:

  • 6 chiles de árbol
  • 1 cup agave nectar
  • ¾ cup water

For the paloma:

  • Lime slice to rim the glass
  • Salt to rim the glass
  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila
  • 1 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 2 ounces fresh squeezed tangerine juice
  • Seltzer water to top
  • Tangerine slice for garnish

Instructions

To make the chile de árbol agave syrup:

  • Add the chile de árbol, agave, and water to a small saucepan and set over medium heat, bring to a simmer. Lower heat to medium and let simmer for 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat, let cool to room temperature (do not refrigerate, the mixture will seize) and strain.

To make the paloma:

  • Rim a chilled glass with lime and salt. Add the tequila, lime juice, tangerine juice, and 1 ounce of the chile de árbol agave syrup to a shaker, add ice, and shake. Strain into the rimmed glass with ice. Top with a splash of seltzer water and garnish with a tangerine slice.

Notes

Gran Paloma de Mandarina con Chile

Honey Ginger Margarita

Honey Ginger Margarita
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Honey Ginger Margarita

A twist on the margarita with a delicious honey ginger syrup.
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ginger, honey, lime, orange, tequila
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the honey ginger syrup:

  • 1 cup honey
  • ¼ cup fresh ginger peeled and sliced
  • ½ cup water

For the margarita:

  • Salt to rim the glass
  • Crushed ice to put in the glass
  • 2 ounces Gran Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 1 ounce fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 ounce orange liqueur
  • 1 cup crushed ice
  • Lime wedge for garnish

Instructions

To make the honey ginger syrup:

  • Add the honey, ginger, and water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium heat. Lower heat to medium low and simmer for 3-5 minutes. Let cool to room temperature and strain before using.

To make the margarita:

  • Rim a glass by dipping it into honey ginger syrup and then into salt. Add crushed ice to the glass.
  • In a shaker add the tequila, lime juice, orange liqueur, and 1 ounce of the honey ginger syrup. Shake until well mixed. Pour into the rimmed glass with ice. Garnish with a lime wedge and serve.

Notes

Margarita de Miel con Jengibre

Tepache

Tepache
Print Recipe
3.8 from 5 votes

Tepache

Tepache recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 10, Episode 3 “Jalisco Classics”
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cinnamon, piloncillo, pineapple
Servings: 8 to 10 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 liters, or 16 cups, water
  • 1 pound piloncillo or dark brown sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1 ripe pineapple or about 3 cups
  • 1 cup lager beer

Instructions

  • Using the traditional big earthenware jug (or a large pot), bring to a boil the 16 cups water along with the piloncillo, cinnamon stick, and whole cloves. Simmer, stirring once in a while, for about 10 minutes or until the piloncillo has dissolved.
  • While the water is simmering, wash the pineapple thoroughly, and remove the stem and bottom. Cut it into 2 inch cubes, without taking off its rind.
  • Once the flavored water is ready, turn off heat and add in the pineapple chunks and cover. Let rest for 2 days, or 48 hours, in a warm area of your kitchen. The mixture will begin to ferment and bubble on the surface. Add a cup of lager beer, stir well, and let it sit for up to 12 hours more. Don’t let it ferment much longer, or you may end up with vinegar instead!
  • Strain tepache through a fine strainer or cheesecloth, and serve very cold. You can either refrigerate it or serve over ice cubes.

Notes

Pineapple Drink

Watermelon Grape Margarita

Watermelon Grape Margarita
Print Recipe
4.34 from 6 votes

Watermelon Grape Margarita

Watermelon Grape Margarita recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 10 "Sabores Norteños"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, Gran Centenario, grapes, jalapeno, lime, Margarita, sandía, serrano chiles, tequila, uva, watermelon
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Gran Centenario Plata Tequila or tequila blanco
  • 3/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 1 cup simple syrup more or less depending on how sweet your fruit is
  • 2 cups frozen Gummyberries grapes or red seedless grapes, plus a few fresh for garnish
  • 2 cups frozen watermelon
  • 1 cup ice
  • 2 slices jalapeño or serrano chile seeded (optional)

Instructions

  • Add all ingredients to a blender and blend until very smooth. Divide between 4 glasses and garnish with a wedge of lime and a few fresh grapes.

Notes

Margarita de Sandía con Uva

Canela Pumpkin Torito

Over the years, and traveling all around to different cities, I’ve realized it’s incredible how much you can learn about Mexican food being in the US. Because Mexicans you meet here come from so many different parts of Mexico, each with their own unique regional cuisine and traditions.

Such was the case when Nándo and Germán responded to my post on social media wondering if anyone in New York would be willing to invite me over for lunch, while I was there for work earlier this month.

Nándo and Germán generously welcomed me into their home in Brooklyn. Where their friends were waiting, including Cristina who traveled all the way from Arizona. I was so thrilled to meet them!

Germán, whose family is in Puebla, made his mom’s adobo for me. Meanwhile, since they were so kind to open their doors to me and do the cooking, drinks were on me. So I brought the tequila. I whipped up a version of a traditional drink from Veracruz for everyone, called a torito. A name I love because torito translates to “little bull,” which refers to the little kick it gives. It can be deceiving because it’s so sweet and creamy.

Since pumpkin is such an essential ingredient in Mexico, I did a pumpkin torito this time. It has pumpkin puree, canela or true cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, vanilla, and sweetened condensed milk. To give it that kick, I use Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila – its deep, rustic, caramelly flavor goes harmoniously with the pumpkin.

When the meal was ready, I felt like I was in a fonda back in Mexico. Nándo made my arroz rojo to go with Germán’s adobo chicken, and we had pinto beans on the side. It was phenomenal, really delicious and comforting.

I felt honored Germán made his mom’s adobo for me, as sharing family recipes truly means a lot.

If Nándo and Germán weren’t already kind enough, they let me bring along my production team and their cameras. So you can watch what happened in the video below…

And, of course, I want you to be able to try my spiced up canela pumpkin torito for the holidays. The recipe is below, so invite over some friends, grab a bottle of tequila, and whip up a batch.

Canela Pumpkin Tortito
Canela Pumpkin Torito
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Canela Pumpkin Torito

Since pumpkin is such an essential ingredient in Mexico, I did a pumpkin torito. It has pumpkin puree, canela or true cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, vanilla, sweetened condensed milk, and a splash of tequila (or leave it out if you choose).
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time0 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, cinnamon, cocktail, Fall, frappe, holiday, pumpkin, spiced, tequila, torito
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila
  • 2 12-ounce cans evaporated milk
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 3/4 cup smooth pumpkin puree
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground canela or true cinnamon
  • Pinch ground nutmeg
  • Pinch ground cloves
  • Ice to serve

Instructions

  • Place the tequila, evaporated milk, condensed milk, pumpkin puree, vanilla extract, canela or cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves in the blender and puree until smooth. Transfer to a pitcher, cover and refrigerate until chilled.
  • Alternatively, you may pour directly over ice cubes or add some ice cubes to your blender and make it a frappé! In any case, serve very cold.

Notes

Torito de Calabaza y Canela

Homemade Horchata

Horchata
Print Recipe
4.86 from 7 votes

Homemade Horchata

Homemade Horchata recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 6 “El Fuerte, Magic Town”
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, ceylon, cinnamon, horchata, milk, pati’s mexican table, rice
Servings: 8 1/4 cups approximately
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Mahatma® Rice white rice
  • 1 stick canela ceylon or true cinnamon, broken into pieces
  • 3 cups boiling hot water
  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup sugar

Instructions

  • Place the rice and cinnamon in a heatproof bowl and cover with the hot water. Let sit anywhere from 2 to 8 hours.
  • When ready to puree the mixture, add the milk and sugar to the rice mixture and stir well. Place in a blender, in batches, and completely puree. Strain into a pitcher as you move along. Serve over ice filled glasses and/or store in the refrigerator.

Notes

Horchata Casera

Café Horchata

Cafe Horchata
Print Recipe
5 from 6 votes

Café Horchata

Café Horchata recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 6 “El Fuerte, Magic Town”
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, ceylon, cinnamon, coffee, espresso, horchata, milk, pati’s mexican table, rice
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Pour horchata into a glass filled with the ice. Pour in the espresso, stir and drink!

Notes

Horchata con Café

Melon Basil Margarita

I love that my work takes me to different cities throughout the United States. And I love having a chance to meet people I’ve connected with, whether through social media or email. Sometimes they will tell me they tried some of my recipes…

The last time I went to Los Angeles, one of our producers reached out to Liz and Ramon, who have watched my show for a long time, talk me regularly on Facebook, and even made the trip all the way from Los Angeles to San Diego to come to one of my live events. They were asked if they’d like to make some of my recipes on camera, but weren’t told that I was going to be there.

So it was a great surprise when I walked in. And it was so exciting for me to see how they have made my recipes their own and are now part of their weekly meals. They had invited their family and friends and were making my Cali-Baja Fish Tacos and my Queso Fundido with homemade chorizo from Ramon’s brother. I cannot even begin to tell you how delicious that chorizo was!

In return for them welcoming us into their home and feeding me and my team, well, drinks were on me! I decided come up with a new drink to share with them, a Melon Basil Margarita. It has the fresh taste of the basil, the sweet from the honeydew melon, and the tangy lime juice you crave in a margarita.

When I took out the bottle of Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila, Ramon told me it was the drink his father-in-law offered the first time he was invited into his home. Of course, I now had to know the story of how him and Liz met… Turns out, Ramon was planning to become a priest when he saw Liz for the first time in church and fell for her. Eight months later they were engaged and gone where Ramon’s plans to be a priest.

He wasn’t invited over to his father-in-law’s for that drink, until after he took Liz to church and married her. But it just goes to show how not only dishes, but ingredients, in this case the Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila, really tie families and friends together.

You can watch all that happened in the video below…

I loved that Melon Basil Margarita so much, I’m sharing it with all of you right here. I hope you’ll grab some tequila and give it a try.

Melon Basil Margarita
Melon Basil Margarita
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Melon Basil Margarita

This Melon Basil Margarita has the fresh taste of the basil, the sweet from the honeydew melon, and the tangy lime juice you crave in a margarita.
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time0 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: albahaca, basil, cocktail, honeydew, lime, Margarita, melon, tequila
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 cup Gran Centenario Añejo Tequila
  • 1 cup orange liquor
  • 1 cup maple syrup
  • 3 cups diced fresh honeydew melon
  • 8 to 10 fresh basil leaves
  • 1 to 2 jalapeños coarsely chopped, seeds on (you can add jalapeño
    to taste)
  • 1 cup ice cubes
  • Lime quarters and coarse salt to rim glasses

Instructions

  • Rim glasses with lime and salt.
  • In the jar of a blender, pour the lime juice, tequila, orange liquor, and maple syrup. Incorporate the honeydew, basil, jalapeño and a cup of ice. Puree until completely smooth.
  • Pour into prepared glasses.

Notes

Margarita de Melón con Albahaca

Hora de Celebrar! Pomegranate, Tequila, Chile y Limón

The leaves have already turned orange, yellow, red and brown here in DC meaning it’s the most celebration-packed time of year. There is Hispanic Heritage Month, Fall and Harvest celebrations, Day of the Dead, Thanksgiving, Passover, Christmas and New Years, just to mention some. I did not even include all of the year end office, school, neighborhood and friend get-togethers.

Boy did this year fly by! I’ve had no time to think about my 2019 New Years resolutions. Not that I ever follow through on them, but I used to at least think about them…

Lately, I’m telling my boys how amazed I am at how fast the time passes. When I was in middle school like Juju, I remember feeling every hour of every day pass, as if churning ice cream by hand… so slow. Coming home from school was a long awaited haul, and getting to the weekend an eternity. As I got older though, time seemed to be marked by the weeks. By college the months seemed to run into each other, only to stop and catch their breath during school breaks.

When I got married and moved to the US, I was so stunned by the change of seasons. It was their passing the baton from one to the other that seemed to mark my pace. Witnessing the seasons changing was new to me having come from Mexico City, where there seems to be one eternal season with a crazy rainy interruption.

Well, the last few years I’ve barely been able to grasp what the marks of time are and can only feel it whirling on! I blink an eye and it’s summer. I blink again, and we seem to be speeding like mad to wrap up the year. I swear the entire year feels like what an hour used to feel like when I was Juju’s age. No surprise then, the faster the years seem to go, the more I want to celebrate anything and everything.

For us Mexicans, celebrating means having tequila around. We even joke about it. You got a promotion at work? Come over for some tequila! You are getting married? Do you have enough tequila?!? You have a dinner at home and are having me over? Can’t show up without your favorite tequila because, frankly, you probably don’t have enough.

Aside from sipping it neat, I love coming up with one new and fabulous cocktail every year to mark our holidays. It has become a trendy thing around here and now my friends expect it. So this year, this is the one. I was daring and bold and it paid off. I call it Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón and it is a delight! And it’s very easy to make. You could even make it ahead of time, too.

I start off with a flavored simple syrup. Many people seem baffled when they hear the term simple syrup. Mixologist jargon for sure, it sounds like something complex to prepare or something you get at a hard to find specialty store. But simple syrup is nothing more than sugar dissolved in water! And you can flavor it any way you want. For this cocktail, I flavor it with whole allspice berries, true cinnamon also known as canela, a whole clove, and the rind of a lemon. It makes for a simple syrup that is fragrant, citrusy, lightly spiced up, and has warm comforting tones from the canela. The more you let the simple syrup sit and become infused, the more the lemon rind will also absorb the simple syrup and become candied. Then it is a treat of a garnish to bite into as you sip your cocktail.

Once you have the spiced up simple syrup, you blend it with the lively and tart pomegranate juice, an entire fresh and grassy jalapeño – do not remove the seeds please – and fresh squeezed lemon juice. For the tequila, I use Gran Centenario Reposado, which is mildly fruity and teasingly sweet. It has a woody fragrance, and you can taste an echo of almond and vanilla in it that compliments the syrup and the pomegranate. They have a page on Facebook and Instagram, if you want to know more about them.

This Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón cocktail is so multilayered and irresistible it’s never an afterthought. You want to savor every single sip. It will claim its delicious place at center stage of your celebration.

spiced up pomegranate cocktail

Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón Cocktail
Print Recipe
4.25 from 4 votes

Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón Cocktail

This Spiced Up Pomegranate, Chile y Limón cocktail is so multilayered and irresistible it’s never an afterthought. You want to savor every single sip. It will claim its delicious place at center stage of your celebration.
Prep Time15 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, lime, pomegranate, tequila
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 4 allspice berries
  • 1/2 stick (about a 1” piece) true cinnamon or canela
  • 1 whole clove
  • Rind of a lemon plus a quarter of the lemon to rim the glasses
  • 3/4 cup Centenario Reposado Tequila
  • 1 1/2 cups pomegranate juice
  • 3/4 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/2 fresh jalapeño stemmed (seeding optional) more to taste
  • 2 cups ice
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground true cinnamon or canela

Instructions

  • In a small saucepan, combine the granulated sugar, water, allspice berries, cinnamon, whole clove and lemon rind. Set over medium heat and let the sugar dissolve, stirring occasionally for 3 to 4 minutes, until you cannot see the sugar granules anymore.
  • Remove from the heat. Let it steep anywhere from 30 minutes to 12 hours. When ready to use, strain the spiced syrup into a small bowl or measuring cup. Reserve the lemon peel and cut it into 6 pieces.
  • In the jar of a blender, add the tequila, pomegranate juice, lemon juice, jalapeño and strained spiced syrup. Puree until completely smooth. Add the ice and puree again.
  • On a small plate, combine the turbinado sugar, salt and ground cinnamon. Rub the top of 6 glasses with a quarter lemon or water and rim with the sugar mixture. Fill each glass with the pomegranate drink, garnish each with one piece of the sweetened lemon peel, and serve!

Notes

Coctel Picosito de Granada, Chile y Limón

Overloaded Mexican Chocolate Milkshake

Pati Jinich overloaded mexican chocolate milkshake
Print Recipe
5 from 5 votes

Overloaded Mexican Chocolate Milkshake

Overloaded Mexican Chocolate Milkshake recipe from Pati's Mexican Table, Season 6 Episode 11 "Juju’s Chocolate-Covered Life"
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Cajeta, Chocolate, ice cream, milkshake, pati's mexican table
Servings: 2 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 1 pint chocolate ice cream
  • 2 ounces Mexican chocolate plus more for garnish
  • 3 tablespoons Cajeta or dulce de leche divided
  • 4 chocolate graham crackers divided
  • Whipped cream for garnish

Instructions

  • To the jar of a blender, add the milk, ice cream, Mexican chocolate, 1 tablespoon of the cajeta or dulce de leche. Blend until smooth. Crumble two graham crackers into the jar and pulse a few times to combine.
  • Spread the remaining cajeta or dulce de leche on the remaining graham crackers and sandwich together. Break up into pieces and use for a garnish.
  • Split the milkshake between two glasses. Spoon a large dollop of whipped cream on top. Top with the graham cracker sandwich pieces and shave some Mexican chocolate on top.

Notes

Malteada de Chocolate Mexicano 

Chipotle Simple Syrup

Print Recipe
3.8 from 5 votes

Chipotle Simple Syrup

Chipotle Simple Syrup recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 604 "The Mezcal Trail"
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Chipotle, cocktail, pati's mexican table, simple syrup
Servings: 1 cup
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 dried chipotle chile

Instructions

  • In a small pot over medium heat, bring the sugar, water and chipotle to a boil. Stir until the sugar dissolves, then take off the heat. Pour into a heat-proof container and let cool.
  • Once cool, you may cover tightly and store in the refrigerator. Make it at least 48 hours ahead of time and if you can, a week ahead. It can store in the refrigerator for months. The more it sits, the more flavor it will have.

Notes

Jarabe Simple de Chipotle

Oaxacan Sour

Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Oaxacan Sour

Oaxacan Sour recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 4 "The Mezcal Trail"
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Chipotle, cocktail, lime, pati's mexican table, pineapple
Servings: 4 cocktails
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups mezcal
  • 3/4 cups freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/2 cup pineapple juice
  • 1/2 cup chipotle simple syrup
  • Lime peel for garnish

Instructions

  • Add all ingredients (except the lime peel) to a pitcher filled with ice. Stir vigorously and pour into a glass over ice. Garnish with the lime peel.
  • Note: Chipotle Simple Syrup is best if made 48 hours ahead of time.

Notes

Sour Oaxaqueño

Coco Fish

Coco Fish cocktail
Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

Coco Fish

Coco Fish recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 5, Episode 13 "José Andrés Takes Over"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, coconut, coconut water, gin, pati's mexican table
Servings: 2 drinks
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup water
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • About 10 leaves fresh mint coarsely chopped
  • 2 cups coconut water
  • 1/2 cup good quality gin
  • Ice cubes
  • Fresh coconut pulp sliced for garnish

Instructions

  • To make the simple syrup, combine the water and sugar in a small saucepan over low heat. Bring to a simmer and cook, stirring a few times, until sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and let cool. 
  • In a couple of glasses, muddle mint with the simple syrup and gin. Add ice, pour coconut water on top, stir, and garnish with the fresh and tender coconut pulp.  

Tropical Mint Pineapple Lime Smoothie

Tropical Mint Pineapple Lime Smoothie
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Tropical Mint Pineapple Lime Smoothie

Tropical Mint Pineapple Lime Smoothie recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 5, Episode 8 "Valladolid: A Day to Explore"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: lime, mint, pati's mexican table, pineapple
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 to 5 cups fresh pineapple cut into chunks
  • 1 lime zested and juiced
  • 1/4 cup mint leaves packed, plus extra for garnish
  • 1 cup ice
  • 1 tablespoon agave syrup (optional)

Instructions

  • Add all ingredients to a blender and puree until smooth. Garnish with mint and/or pineapple cubes and serve.

Notes

Licuado de Menta, Piña y Limón

Spinning Top Cocktail

spinning top cocktail
Print Recipe
4.8 from 5 votes

Spinning Top Cocktail

Spinning Top Cocktail recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 12 "Girls Just Wanna Have Fun"
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chile powder, cocktail, grapefruit, mezcal, mint, pati's mexican table, pineapple, tequila
Servings: 1 cocktail
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For rimming the glass:

  • 1 lime wedge (about 1/4 of a fresh lime)
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 2 tablespoons ground chile powder such as chile piquín, ancho, chipotle or a Mexican mix, or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons kosher or coarse sea salt

For the drink:

  • 11/2 cups Ice cubes
  • 4 tablespoons (2 ounces) mezcal or tequila
  • 3/4 cup grapefruit soda
  • 1/4 cup pineapple juice
  • 1 to 2 fresh mint leaves

Instructions

  • Run the lime wedge around the rim of a glass. Place the sugar, chile powder and salt on a small plate and dip the rim of the glass in the salt to coat.
  • Add the ice cubes to the glass, then pour in the mezcal, grapefruit soda and pineapple juice, stir gently. Tear the mint leaves into several pieces and drop them into the glass, stirring gently so they release their flavor into the drink.

Notes

Trompo Zacatecano

Malted Tequila Milkshake

Why a malted tequila milkshake, you may ask? Because we can!

And because it is outrageously delicious and silky and smooth and a true treat.

And because we have so much to celebrate: Mexican cuisine is stepping out of the “ethnic” denomination and proudly stepping into the mainstream as people’s appetite has increased to the point of wanting to get to know it better…

And because misconceptions about Mexicans, Mexican food and Mexican ingredients continue to be broken, and the beauty, diversity, richness and wealth of what “Mexican” encompasses is being acknowledged.

And because the myth that tequila is only worthwhile for being drunk as shots during Spring Break no longer holds true. There is not only good, but phenomenal quality tequila that can be sipped as the finest of whiskeys. To boot, it can also be used as a fine ingredient for mixed drinks, and it has so much versatility that there is even exquisite tequila liqueur that can be sipped as an apéritif or used for desserts.

And because we have the freedom to play in our kitchens, with much respect for our heritage and the ingredients that come along with it, I have taken the liberty of creating this glorious grown up milkshake! I wish I could have made it in time for inclusion in my upcoming cookbook Mexican Today. But every single recipe in there is a recipe I am proud of, whether a rediscovered classic or a new dish. My hope is you will savor every bite of what you try from it, as we do at home.

And because I want to make a toast to you all, with all my gratitude, for coming to this site to visit, for watching any or many of the episodes of my PBS series and  letting me come into your home. Hopefully, I will get to meet many of you during my upcoming 20-plus city book tour.

And because my promise to you is to keep on working as hard as I can to make every single recipe you try here completely worth it.

With much love,

Pati

 

malted tequila milkshake
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Malted Tequila Milkshake

Why a malted tequila milkshake, you may ask? Because we can! And because it is outrageously delicious and silky and smooth and a true treat. And because we have so much to celebrate: Mexican cuisine is stepping out of the “ethnic” denomination and proudly stepping into the mainstream as people’s appetite has increased to the point of wanting to get to know it better…
Cook Time5 mins
Course: Dessert, Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ice cream, malted milk, milkshake, pati's mexican table, tequila, vanilla
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 tablespoons Agavero Tequila Liqueur
  • 2 tablespoons malted milk powder
  • 1 1/4 cup good quality vanilla bean ice cream

Instructions

  • Pour the milk, vanilla extract, Agavero tequila liqueur, and malted milk powder in the blender and puree until completely blended. Incorporate the ice cream and blend on low speed, just until combined. Pour into a milkshake glass and serve along with a straw or large spoon.

Notes

Malteada de Tequila

Toritos: Peanut and Vanilla Aperitif

Print Recipe
5 from 2 votes

Toritos: Peanut and Vanilla Aperitif

Toritos: Peanut and Vanilla Aperitif recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 12 “Vanilla”
Prep Time2 mins
Cook Time3 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: aguardiente de caña, cane liquor, cocktail, coffee, evaporated milk, mexican vanilla, pati's mexican table, peanut butter, Sweetened Condensed Milk
Servings: 4 to 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 12-ounce cans evaporated milk
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 3/4 cup cane liquor (aguardiente de caña) or rum, more or less to taste
  • 3/4 cup smooth peanut butter (or espresso, if you want to make it coffee flavored)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Ice to serve

Instructions

  • Place the cane liquor, evaporated milk, condensed milk, peanut butter and vanilla extract in the blender and puree until smooth. Transfer to a jar, cover and refrigerate until chilled.
  • Alternatively, you may also pour directly over ice cubes or add some ice cubes to your blender and make it a Frappé! In any case, serve very cold.
  • NOTE: There are different Torito flavors. To make coffee Toritos, substitute peanut butter for a cup of strong coffee and add more sugar to taste. To make fruit Toritos, substitute peanut butter for about 2 cups of guaba or mango (or any fruit of your choice) pulp, and sugar to taste.

Notes

Torito: Bebida de Cacahuate y Vainilla

Spiced Sweet Mexican Coffee

spiced sweet mexican coffee or cafe de olla
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Spiced Sweet Mexican Coffee

Spiced Sweet Mexican Coffee recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 11 “Middle Eastern Influences”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cinnamon, coffee, mexican coffee, olla, pati's mexican table, piloncillo
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 6 cups water
  • 6 tbsp coarsely ground dark roasted coffee
  • 4 oz piloncillo can substitute for brown sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick

Instructions

  • Heat the water in a pot set over medium heat (using a clay pot is the traditional way to prepare it and it gives it a very unique flavor, but it isn’t necessary). When the water comes to a boil, lower the heat and add the coffee, piloncillo, and a cinnamon stick.
  • Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes, stirring until the piloncillo dissolves. Remove from the heat, let it stand covered for 5 to 10 minutes and strain before serving. Alternatively, you may remove the cinnamon and use a French press to strain the coffee as well.

Notes

Café de Olla

Horchata with Cinnamon and Vanilla

horchata
Print Recipe
4.63 from 8 votes

Horchata with Cinnamon and Vanilla

Horchata with Cinnamon and Vanilla recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 10 “Cinnamon”
Prep Time2 hrs
Cook Time2 mins
Total Time2 hrs 2 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ceylon, cinnamon, pati's mexican table, rice, vanilla
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups long or extra long white rice
  • 3 cups hot water
  • 1 cinnamon stick ceylon or true cinnamon, if you can
  • 1 tbsp vanilla extract
  • 4 cups milk
  • 1 1/4 cup sugar
  • Ground cinnamon to sprinkle on top optional

Instructions

  • Place the rice in a bowl and cover with hot water. Roughly crumble a piece of true cinnamon into the rice mix (cassia will not let you break it…) and let is all sit and rest anywhere from 2 to 8 hours outside of the refrigerator.
  • Place half of the rice mixture in the blender with half of the milk and vanilla and blend until smooth, then strain into a pitcher or container (if using cassia cinnamon, remove it). Place the other half of the rice mixture in the blender with the remaining milk and the sugar, pure until smooth and strain into the same pitcher or container.
  • Stir well and serve over ice cubes, or place in the refrigerator until it is cold. Serve with more ice cubes to your liking, and sprinkle some ground cinnamon on top if you wish.

Notes

Horchata: Agua de Arroz y Canela

Jamaica Water

jamaica water
Print Recipe
4.86 from 7 votes

Jamaica Water

Jamaica Water recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 6 "Hibiscus Flowers"
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: agua fresca, beverage, coconut water, drink, hibiscus, jamaica, Mexican, non-alcoholic, refreshing, water
Servings: 4 to 5 cups
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

Jamaica Concentrate (makes about 5 cups):

  • 8 cups water
  • 2 cups dried hibiscus or jamaica flowers about 2-3 ounces, depending on how tightly you pack the cups
  • 1 1/2 cups sugar or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice or to taste

Jamaica Water:

  • 1 cup of the Jamaica Concentrate
  • 3 to 4 cups water

Instructions

To make the concentrate:

  • In a saucepan, pour 8 cups of water and place over high heat. Once it comes to a boil, add the jamaica flowers, simmer at medium heat for 10 to 12 minutes and turn off the heat. Let it cool down and strain into a heat proof glass or plastic water jar. Add the sugar and lime juice, mix well, cover and refrigerate.
  • It will keep in the refrigerator for at least 3 months.

To make the jamaica water:

  • When ready to serve, dilute 1 cup concentrate with 3 to 4 cups water, or to your liking, and some ice cubes.

Notes

Agua de Jamaica

Avocado Martini

avocado martini
Print Recipe
4.67 from 3 votes

Avocado Martini

Avocado Martini recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 3 “Avocado”
Prep Time2 mins
Cook Time3 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, Cajeta, cocktail, martini, pati's mexican table, Sweetened Condensed Milk, vermouth, vodka
Servings: 1 martini
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 oz vodka
  • 1/2 oz dry vermouth
  • 1/2 cup ripe pulp from a Mexican avocado
  • 2 tbsp Cajeta or dulce de leche
  • 2 tbsp sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/4 cup milk

Instructions

  • Pour all of the ingredients into a blender and puree until smooth. Pour into a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake it and strain into chilled martini glasses.

Notes

Martini de Aguacate

Ancho Chile and Orange Juice Tequila Chaser

ancho chile chaser
Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

Ancho Chile and Orange Juice Tequila Chaser

Ancho Chile and Orange Juice Tequila Chaser recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 8 “Tequila!”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time12 mins
Total Time17 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: ancho chiles, cocktail, lime, onion, orange juice, pati's mexican table, tequila
Servings: 10 to 12 small servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 or 2 ancho chiles (about 1 ounce)
  • 3 cups fresh squeezed orange juice
  • 1/4 cup white onion chopped
  • 1 tablespoon fresh squeezed lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or sea salt or to taste

Instructions

  • Heat a comal or dry skillet over low-medium heat until hot.
  • Remove the stems, seeds and veins from the ancho chiles. Toast over the hot comal or dry skillet, over medium heat, for about 15 seconds per side, until chiles have softened and then begin to toast, have changed their color and released their aroma. Be careful not to burn them.
  • Place the chiles in a saucepan and cover them with water. Bring to a boil and simmer over medium heat for 10 minutes, until they rehydrate and look plump; let cool.
  • Place chiles and 1/2 cup of their cooking liquid in a blender along with the orange juice, lime juice, white onion and salt. Purée until smooth.
  • Serve as a drink alongside tequila in caballitos or straight, poured over ice cubes. Sangrita can be refrigerated for up to a week.

Notes

Sangrita

Derek Brown’s ‘Satin Sheets’ Cocktail

satin sheets cocktail
Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

Derek Brown’s ‘Satin Sheets’ Cocktail

Derek Brown’s ‘Satin Sheets’ Cocktail recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 8 “Tequila!”
Prep Time2 mins
Cook Time3 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: agave syrup, cocktail, lime, pati's mexican table, tequila, Velvet Falernum
Servings: 1 cocktail
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 oz silver tequila
  • 1/2 oz Velvet Falernum
  • 3/4 oz fresh lime juice
  • 1/2 oz agave syrup
  • ice
  • Fresh lime wheel

Instructions

  • Mix the liquors, lime juice, agave syrup and ice in a cocktail mixer. Strain and add the fresh lime wheel.

Notes

"Sábanas de Satín" de Derek Brown

Coco-Lime Margarita: Let’s Toast to Cinco (and a New Cookbook…)!

It is almost time for Cinco.

If you are a Mexican living in the US and you want to get attention, if you want to make some noise, if you feel that you have something good to share or say: Cinco de Mayo is your day!

My first cooking demo: Foods from Puebla during Cinco.

The first time I got invited to cook on TV: Chicken Tinga for Cinco.

My first radio interview: Do Mexicans celebrate Cinco?

The biggest sales day for my first cookbook: Cinco.

The day I was honored to be invited as guest chef to cook at the White House: You guessed it, Cinco!

Heck: you aren’t Mexican and hoping for an opportunity? Wait for Cinco anyway.

The funny thing is, in Mexico, Cinco de Mayo is a local celebration mainly in the city of Puebla, where a small Mexican militia beat a large French army in 1862. The French won right back and it took a few years for Mexico to shake itself off from an imposed European Monarchy.

Cinco is not a national holiday. There aren’t fiestas throughout the country that day. There isn’t Mariachi music on every corner. No margaritas generously poured in the middle afternoon specifically on that day. We don’t dress Mexican, partly because we are Mexicans every single day of the year, but mostly, because when we dress ourselves in the color of the Mexican flag it is either for Mexican Independence Day -September 16- or when Mexico is playing an international soccer match. And then, we dress the entire country as well.

But in the US, for whatever reason, Cinco de Mayo has become a day to celebrate anything and everything we love about Mexico, Mexicans and Mexican food. And thus, there are Mexican fiestas everywhere, Mariachi music playing on street corners, slushy margaritas of all kinds being poured in the middle of the afternoon, and people – be them Mexicans or not– dressing as Mexicans.

And for that: we need to toast and celebrate!

Any occasion to celebrate the beauty, the warmth, the richness of Mexican food and culture, the resilience of our people, is welcome by Mexicans everywhere.

To help celebrate, here is my gift for you this Cinco: A crazy good Coco-Lime Margarita. One that transports you to the beach where you can taste the salty sea breeze in the rim and munch on toasted sweetened coconut with a sprinkle of lime zest as you sip along a creamy and luscious Margarita.

It is a very special one for me, too, because I developed it for my next cookbook, which I am working on. It is called “Mexican Today” and will be published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. I am thrilled to be working with my same editor, Rux Martin, and so very thankful she considered publishing my second cookbook.

Please do look out for it! I am having so much fun with it and I know you will too. I am going wild in those pages… It will come out in 2016. Guess when? A month before Cinco!

From this Mexican to you, with all my gratitude and love, I hope you enjoy this Margarita.

Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Coco-Lime Margarita

Any occasion to celebrate the beauty, the warmth, the richness of Mexican food and culture, the resilience of our people, is welcome by Mexicans everywhere. To help celebrate, here is my gift for you this Cinco: A crazy good Coco-Lime Margarita. One that transports you to the beach where you can taste the salty sea breeze in the rim and munch on toasted sweetened coconut with a sprinkle of lime zest as you sip along a creamy and luscious Margarita.
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time2 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, coconut, lime, pati's mexican table, tequila
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup sweetened shredded coconut such as Bakers’ Coconut Angel Flakes
  • Pinch of kosher or coarse sea salt plus more for the glasses
  • 1 lime zested then quartered for the glasses
  • 1 1/2 cups cream of coconut
  • 1 cup white or silver tequila
  • 2/3 cup Triple Sec Cointreau or another orange liqueur
  • 1/3 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 2 cups Ice cubes for pouring on the rocks or making slushy style

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Spread the angel flakes on a small baking sheet, sprinkle with a pinch of salt and the lime zest, mix and spread again. Place in the oven and bake for 6 to 7 minutes, or until the coconut is just barely beginning to color. It should not brown. Remove from the oven and immediately transfer to a small bowl. Reserve.
  • Pour some salt onto a small plate. Rub the rims of the glasses with the quartered lime, squeezing some of the juice over them. Then gently dip in the salt, coating all around the rims. Set aside.
  • Combine the cream of coconut, tequila, orange liqueur and lime juice in a blender and puree until completely mixed and smooth. If making slushy style, add the 2 cups of ice and puree until almost smooth. Serve with the toasted flakes on top.
  • If serving on the rocks, fill each glass with about 1/2 cup ice cubes and pour in the margarita mixture. Top with the coconut flakes.

Notes

Margarita de Coco con Limón

Guava Spritzer

guava spritzer pati jinich
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Guava Spritzer

Guava Spritzer recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 13 “Backyard Picnic”
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: agave syrup, cocktail, grapefruit, guava, jalapeno, lime, pati's mexican table, tequila
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups freshly squeezed grapefruit juice chilled
  • 4 cups guava nectar chilled
  • 1/4 cup light agave syrup or to taste
  • 1 liter citrus sparkling mineral water chilled
  • 16 ounces tequila blanco optional for grown ups, 2 ounces per drink
  • Ice cubes for serving
  • Grapefruit supremes or slices for serving
  • Lime wedges for serving
  • Fresh jalapeño slices (optional for garnish)

Instructions

  • In a large pitcher, combine the grapefruit juice, guava nectar and agave syrup. Stir well to combine. Taste for sweetness and add more agave as necessary. Pour the juice mixture over ice into glasses for serving, top with a splash of mineral water and serve with a grapefruit supreme and lime wedge.
  • For the adults, pour the juice into an ice filled glass, add 2 ounces of tequila and a splash of mineral water. Garnish with a grapefruit or lime wedge and a fresh jalapeño slice and serve.

Notes

Bebida de Guayaba

Champurrado

Print Recipe
4.58 from 7 votes

Champurrado

Champurrado recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 5 “Tamaliza!”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: atole, Chocolate, cinnamon, masa, mexican chocolate, pati's mexican table, piloncillo
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup corn masa flour
  • 4 cups warm water
  • 4 cups milk
  • 8 ounces Mexican chocolate for drinking such as Abuelita, grated or cut into chunks (about 1 cup)
  • 2 ounces grated piloncillo or brown sugar (about 1/4 cup)
  • 1 cinnamon stick about 3-inches long

Instructions

  • Stir the corn masa flour into the warm water. Let it sit for a couple minutes and strain it onto a saucepan set over medium heat. Incorporate the milk and let it simmer for 3 to 4 minutes, so it will begin to thicken. Incorporate the piloncillo or brown sugar, the chocolate and the cinnamon stick. Simmer for about 5 minutes, stirring here and there, until the chocolate and the piloncillo dissolve. Serve hot.

Notes

Chocolate Atole

Juju’s Mango Smoothie

Print Recipe
4.84 from 6 votes

Juju’s Mango Smoothie

Juju’s Mango Smoothie recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 1 "Good Morning, Mexico!"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time3 mins
Total Time8 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: banana, breakfast, mango, orange juice, pati's mexican table, smoothie, vanilla
Servings: 3 cups
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups diced fresh mango or thawed from frozen
  • 1 teaspoon Mexican vanilla extract
  • 2 cups orange juice preferably fresh squeezed
  • 1 ripe banana sliced

Instructions

  • Combine the mango, vanilla, orange juice, and banana in a blender and puree until smooth. Add a couple handfuls of ice cubes and puree until well blended.

Ponche: Or My Mom’s New Year’s Warm Fruit Punch

My mom is the best cook I know.

Growing up in Mexico City, she used to make the most incredible ponche, or warm fruit punch, every New Year’s Eve. Just once a year.

My sisters and I used to pace up and down the kitchen as she peeled, diced and threw the ingredients – many of which were only available at this time of year in the markets – into a gigantic pot. To tame our impatience she would peel a few pieces of the fresh sugar cane meant to go into that pot, and cut it into smaller sticks, so we could chew and suck its sweetly tangy juice, ever so slowly, as we waited for the ponche to be served.

Coincidentally, the ponche was always ready as guests were about to walk in the door. Then, she would start ladling the ponche into big mugs as we each called out our requests. I asked for extra sugar cane and tejocotes, or crabapples, one of my sisters asked to have hers without raisins, another with no fruit but just the punch liquid, and another with extra fruit and no prunes.

After the kids were served, she would grab the bottle of rum and spike the ponche for the grown ups. Everyone held their cups with both hands, trying to sip as steam covered their faces with each attempt, as it used to be served so very hot.

As life sometimes goes, my parents divorced. A long time ago, actually. I must have been fourteen or so. Since then, my mom has only made ponche once for New Years Eve, at my in-laws in the small town of Valle de Bravo, after my oldest son was born. It was as crazy good a ponche, as ever.

ponche ingredients

I am very lucky though. Although my parents are divorced, and I don’t get to spend New Year’s with all my sisters and their families and my parents, as if they were a couple still, we get together as often as we can. We are all growing old, of course, but everyone is still here, tagging along.

Most years, I get to spend New Year’s with my in-laws and my husband’s entire family. Although they don’t make ponche, my mother-in-law makes one mean tamal casserole, and all her grandchildren (they are so many!) have a blast. This year, I am planning on making for them my mom’s New Year’s punch. Maybe my mom will come visit, one never knows.

I am even more lucky, and you are too, because I called my mom yesterday morning to get some extra details on the recipe.

So… I am sharing the recipe with you to say gracias. Thank you for allowing me to come into your homes with my recipes and stories. Thank you for taking the time to write and say hi. Thank you for sharing with me your stories; for telling me what you have tried or hope to try in your kitchen. Also for telling me what you don’t want to try.

Because food connects us all. And because the ponche tasted almost as sweet yesterday when I made it for my boys, as when my mom used to make it for her girls. I hope it tastes even sweeter to you, for whomever and whenever you decide to make it.

With my best wishes for the new year and with all my gratitude,

Pati

ponche

P.S. This recipe is to start you off. You can also use any other fruits you fancy. Pears are great, so is pineapple. Other fresh and dried fruits, and even nuts, work their wonders when being simmered all together in a warm drink with a base of piloncillo and the cinnamon.

ponche
Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

New Year’s Warm Fruit Punch

My mom is the best cook I know. Growing up in Mexico City, she used to make the most incredible ponche, or warm fruit punch, every New Year’s Eve. Just once a year. My sisters and I used to pace up and down the kitchen as she peeled, diced and threw the ingredients – many of which were only available at this time of year in the markets – into a gigantic pot.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time35 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: apple, apricot, ceylon, cinnamon, cocktail, crabapples, guava, orange, piloncillo, prunes, Recipe, rum, sugarcane, tejocotes
Servings: 10 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 8 ounces tejocotes or crabapples fresh or preserved
  • 3 quarts (12 cups) water
  • 2 true or ceylon cinnamon sticks
  • 8 ounces piloncillo about 1 cup packed if grated, or dark brown sugar
  • 1 pound sugarcane peeled and cut into pieces of 4" to 5” in height and ½" width, or thawed from frozen
  • 8 ounces yellow Mexican guavas cut into bite-sized chunks, or thawed frozen
  • 2 apples of your choice peeled, cored, cut into bite-sized chunks
  • 1/2 cup pitted prunes roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup dried apricots roughly chopped
  • 1/2 cup raisins or to taste
  • Rind of an orange
  • 1/2 cup rum sugar cane liquor, brandy or tequila, optional

Instructions

  • In a medium saucepan, bring a couple cups water to a boil. Add the tejocotes, remove from heat and let them sit for 5 minutes, drain. If using the preserved tejocotes, just drain. Once cool enough to handle, peel them, cut them in half and discard their seeds.
  • In a large pot or clay pot, pour 12 cups water with the cinnamon and piloncillo, set over medium-high heat. Once it comes to a simmer, reduce heat to medium and add the sugar cane, along with the guavas, apples, prunes, apricots, raisins and tejocotes. Simmer for 20 to 30 minutes, stirring every once in a while. Add the orange rind and simmer for another 10 minutes.
  • If you will take your ponche spiked, this is when you add the rum. Stir and cover until ready to serve.
  • Discard the cinnamon and orange rind before serving. Serve in mugs, trying to add a bit of each fruit.

Notes

Ponche de Año Nuevo

Mixed Melon, Lime and Coconut Agua Fresca

Mixed Melon Lime Coconut Agua Fresca
Print Recipe
4.41 from 5 votes

Mixed Melon, Lime and Coconut Agua Fresca

Mixed Melon, Lime and Coconut Agua Fresca recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 13 “My Piñata Party”
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time2 hrs
Total Time2 hrs 15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cantaloupe, coconut water, honey, lime, mint, pati's mexican table, watermelon
Servings: 16 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 12 cups (about 1 8-pound watermelon) seeded watermelon cubed
  • 4 cups cantaloupe cubed
  • 2 cups coconut water
  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice (about 6 limes juiced)
  • 1 liter seltzer water
  • Lime slices to garnish
  • mint leaves to garnish

Instructions

  • Working in batches, combine the watermelon, cantaloupe, coconut water, honey and lime juice in a blender. Pulse until well pureed. If desired, pass the mixture through a fine-mesh strainer. Refrigerate in a large punch bowl until well chilled, about 2 hours.
  • Serve with a splash of seltzer and garnish with lime slices and mint leaves.

Notes

Agua Fresca de Sandia, Melón, Limón y Coco

Cucumber Martini

cucumber martini
Print Recipe
4.5 from 4 votes

Cucumber Martini

Cucumber Martini recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 11 "Mex-Italian!"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time1 min
Total Time6 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, cucumber, gin, lemon, Limoncello, pati's mexican table, simple syrup
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 ounce gin
  • 1 ounce Limoncello
  • 1 slice of lemon to macerate
  • 1 slice of cucumber to macerate
  • 1/2 ounce simple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon diced cucumber

Instructions

  • In an empty shaker or martini mixer, combine the gin, limoncello, lemon and cucumber slices, and the syrup. Mix and macerate all the ingredients for about 5 minutes. If making a large quantity, let it sit in the refrigerator in a pitcher for up to 12 hours.
  • Fill the shaker with ice and shake vigorously for 1 minute. Strain and pour the liquid into a chilled martini glass. Decorate the martini with the small pieces of cucumber and a spiral of cucumber skin.

Notes

Martini de Pepino 

Spiced Sweet Mexican Coffee

spiced sweet mexican coffee or cafe de olla
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Spiced Sweet Mexican Coffee

Spiced Sweet Mexican Coffee recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 10 “Brunch at the Jinich House”
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: brown sugar, ceylon, cinnamon, coffee, pati's mexican table, piloncillo
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 8 cups water
  • 6 tablespoons coarsely ground dark-roasted coffee beans
  • 8 tablespoons grated or finely chopped piloncillo or dark brown sugar or to taste
  • 1 ceylon or true cinnamon stick

Instructions

  • Bring the water to a rolling boil in a pot. Reduce the heat to low and add the coffee, piloncillo and cinnamon stick. Simmer partially covered for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, then turn off the heat and let sit, covered, for 5 minutes.
  • Strain through a fine sieve or cheesecloth and serve. Alternatively, remove the cinnamon stick and pour the drink into a French press; press down on the plunger and serve.

Notes

Café de Olla

Dressed Up Mexican Beer

dressed up Mexican beer or michelada
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Dressed Up Mexican Beer

Dressed Up Mexican Beer recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 9 “Pot Luck Party”
Prep Time1 min
Cook Time2 mins
Total Time3 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: beer, hot sauce, lime, Maggi sauce, pati's mexican table, soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce
Servings: 1 beer
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 beer mug chilled
  • Kosher or sea salt for coating the rim
  • 1 lime wedge
  • Ice cubes (optional)
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 beer preferably Mexican, chilled
  • Dash of hot sauce like Tabasco Cholula or Valentina (optional)
  • Dash of a salty sauce like soy sauce Worcestershire or Maggi Sauce (optional)
  • Pinch of freshly ground black pepper (optional)
  • Pinch of kosher or coarse sea salt (optional)

Instructions

  • Pour a layer of salt onto a small plate. Rub the rim of a chilled beer mug with the lime wedge and dip the rim gently into the salt to coat. Place the ice cubes, if using, into the mug. If making a basic michelada, add the lime juice on top of the ice, then pour in the beer.
  • If making a michelada especial, salt the rim of a chilled beer mug as directed above, then place the optional ingredients, to taste, into the mug. Stir the mixture lightly then pour in the beer.

Notes

Michelada

Sriracha Mezcal Cocktail

Sriracha Mezcal Cocktail
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Sriracha Mezcal Cocktail

Sriracha Mezcal Cocktail recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 8 “Asian Influences in Mexican Cooking”
Prep Time2 mins
Cook Time3 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, hot suace, lime, mezcal, pati's mexican table, Sriracha sauce
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cup mezcal joven (young mezcal)
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed lime juice plus more for coating the glass rims
  • 1 liter lime- or lemon-flavored sparkling soda
  • 1/4 cup Sriracha sauce
  • kosher or coarse sea salt for coating the glass rims

Instructions

  • Mix the mezcal, lime juice, soda and Sriracha sauce in a large pitcher. Stir well and add a few ice cubes.
  • Pour a layer of salt onto a small plate. Onto another small plate, squeeze enough lime juice to wet the top rims of the serving glasses. And, one by one, gently dip the top rims of the glasses first into the lime juice, then into the salt to coat. Add a few ice cubes to each glass and pour the cocktail.

Notes

Cocktail de Mezcal con Sriracha

Grilled Pineapple Margarita

grilled pineapple margarita pati jinich
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Grilled Pineapple Margarita

Grilled Pineapple Margarita recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 5 “Family Fiesta”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: agave syrup, cilantro, cocktail, grill recipes, jalapeno, lime, pati's mexican table, pineapple, piquí­n chiles, tequila
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil for greasing the grill
  • 1 pineapple peeled, cored, and cut into 1/2-inch rings, crosswise
  • 1 jalapeño chopped, or more to taste
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro leaves and upper stems
  • 3 cups pineapple juice
  • 1 cup white or silver tequila
  • 3/4 cup freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/2 cup agave syrup or simple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons ground piquín chile or Mexican dried ground chile
  • 1/2 cup turbinado or dark brown sugar

Instructions

  • Preheat a grill to medium-high heat. Brush the grill with oil and place the pineapple rings flat on the grill, and cook, flipping once, until charred on both sides, about 3 minutes. Set aside to cool while you mix the cocktail.
  • In a large pitcher, add the jalapeño, cilantro and 2 tablespoons of the brown sugar. Using a muddler or the handle of a wooden spoon, begin to muddle or crush the ingredients together. Chop all but 2 pieces of the pineapple (will be used for garnish) into 1-inch pieces and muddle those with the jalapeño mixture. Add the tequila, pineapple juice, lime juice and syrup and stir well to combine. Let sit for at least 10 minutes or place in the refrigerator until ready to serve.
  • In a small saucer, combine the remaining sugar, salt and chile powder. Dip the rims of the margarita glasses into another saucer with water to wet the rims, alternately rub rims with half a lime, then dip into the sugar, salt and chile mixture. Fill each glass with the chunky margarita (making sure you are adding the chunks of muddled fruits and vegetables) and garnish with a wedge of pineapple.

Notes

Margarita de Piña Asada

Totally Unexpected: Cucumber Martini

I had fallen for the city of Puebla almost 20 years ago. And you know how that goes, sometimes when going back to things you loved while young and are nostalgic about, there’s a risk of disappointment.

Just the first night I was back, I felt myself fall for it all over again. After days of scouting, eating, researching, testing and filming with Cortez Brothers, I left with a disorganized mental list of things I didn’t even had the chance to try.

See, the charm is everywhere: from the history inhaled in each corner; to the talavera tiles splattered all over buildings, tables, vases and plates; to the food which makes you want to lick the plates clean, be it paper plates at markets – like this one holding cumin tamales with a side of peanut atole…

Cucumber Martini 1

…or fine talavera holding Mole Poblano enchiladas,

Cucumber Martini 2

at El Mural de los Poblanos, one of the city’s top restaurants with to-die-for food.

Cucumber Martini 3

But what I fell for the most, were Poblanos-namely the people from Puebla. Poblanos will give you their time and attention, no matter how busy their schedule may be. And they will do it wholeheartedly with care and sweet enthusiasm.

No wonder why, in the midst of a city where just about any random street gives you a thousand photo shots to aim at, Poblanos are falling all over each other.

Cucumber Martini 4

Seriously: There are people hugging everywhere…

Cucumber Martini 5

…despite posts, whether it rains or shines, and no matter what time of day.

I mean, forget about hugging, there seemed to be a lot of kissing too (I am all for public displays of affection, because hey, we have just so much time on this earth and if someone is lucky to be with whom they love and they want to show it, I say go for it).

Cucumber Martini 6

So, I fell for Puebla, which was to be expected. But what was totally unexpected in my hunt for tasting more scrumptious Mexican food, which is found in every corner of this city, was finding some of the best Italian food I have ever tried.

That’s right.

In the middle of the heart of Puebla.

And what do you know? There had to be a love story involved…

Cucumber Martini 7
photo Nacho Guani

Luis Carpintero, the owner, had worked in restaurants and bars for most of his life -since he was a kid in his mother’s small restaurants. He fell in love with Monica and for years their dream was to open up a restaurant together. Since Puebla has such extraordinary Mexican food wherever you turn, they opted for Italian, which is their favorite after Mexican (like me…).

A friend of a friend of a friend of Luis knew of a Mexican woman, who had gone to Italy 3 decades ago. She had fallen in love with an Italian chef named Piero Giangrande and dragged him to Tlaxcala, a neighboring state of Puebla, where he opened up shop. Luis and Monica sought him out and for ten years planned this Italia Mia endeavor.

There is a large wooden oven for pizza and pasta made from scratch. About that pasta: I had such a hard time choosing which to have that I ended up sampling from everyone’s plates and still couldn’t decide. Chef Piero, watches over the staff as they roll out every single sheet of pasta. That one right there is stuffed with veal, pork, Parmesano Reggiano and Prosciutto, and it is served with a white truffle sauce that is as delicate in your tongue and as strong in its intensity after you swallow.

Cucumber Martini 8

Luis and Monica put their lifetime savings and the entirety of their hopes and hard work into this place. And you can feel it: sparks fly when they light up the bar (photo does not do justice to it really, it was taken with my phone).

They have a Martini menu with 22 options where they serve, as Luis calls, tragos coquetos – flirty drinks. And flirt they do!

Cucumber Martini 9

The Cucumber Martini that Luis and Monica suggested I try bewitched me so, that as soon as I had the chance back in DC I ran to the liquor store to get Limoncello, one of its main ingredients. I even made it at a function last week and guests were marveling about it.

Cucumber in a Martini?!? Yeah, that’s what I thought. Try it: you will not believe how charming it tastes. Just like Puebla, anything that I tried there, whether Mexican or not, makes me want to come back for more.

Cucumber Martini 10

As you take each sip, you get the chance to munch on the diced cucumber, which has been soaking in the martini. When you try it, you will find the experience to be totally unexpected too.

Cucumber Martini main
Print Recipe
4.67 from 3 votes

Cucumber Martini

The Cucumber Martini that Luis and Monica suggested I try bewitched me so, that as soon as I had the chance back in DC I ran to the liquor store to get Limoncello, one of its main ingredients. I even made it at a function last week and guests were marveling about it. Cucumber in a Martini?!? Yeah, that’s what I thought. Try it: you will not believe how charming it tastes.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time1 min
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cocktail, cucumber, gin, lemon, Limoncello, Recipe, simple syrup
Servings: 1 martini
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 ounce Bombay Gin or gin of your choice
  • 1 ounce Limoncello
  • A slice of lemon and cucumber to macerate
  • 1/2 ounce natural or simple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon diced cucumber

Instructions

  • In an empty shaker or martini mixer combine all the liquors, slices of lemon and cucumber, and the syrup. Mix and macerate all the ingredients for about 5 minutes. If making a large quantity, let it sit in the refrigerator in a pitcher up to 12 hours.
  • Fill the shaker with ice and shake vigorously for 1 minute. Strain and pour the liquid into a chilled martini glass. Decorate the martini with the small pieces of cucumber and a spiral of cucumber skin.

Notes

Martini de Pepino

Crazy for Tepache

I am crazy for Tepache. Gently sweet, with an innocent hint of home brewed alcohol, a deep freshness and a gorgeous amber color.

Tepache: A home made fermented drink that comes from the state of Jalisco – also breeding ground of other Mexican symbols like Tequila, Charros and Mariachis. Tepache has a base of fresh pineapple, true cinnamon, piloncillo and water and has been drank in Mexico since Pre-Colonial times.

I have made it many times throughout my life.

First, when Daniel and I moved to Texas, to celebrate our finding piloncillo at a U.S. grocery store. Later, when we moved to DC, to soothe the heat of that first long summer and to make our new home, feel like home. A couple years ago, I brewed liters to share with a large crowd for a class I taught on foods from Jalisco.

Then, I forgot about it. Until this summer, when we moved, the heat started pumping up and I unpacked my old clay pot from Tlaquepaque, Jalisco. A pot that is perfect for brewing Tepache, which is so simple to make. That is, if you can keep an eye on it.

You need to find a ripe pineapple. Almost entirely yellow and soft to the touch.

Tepache 1

After you rinse it, remove the top.

Tepache 2
Do away with the bottom too…

Tepache 3

 

Cut into thick slices, whichever way you want, horizontal or vertical, including the peel. The peel will help the drink ferment and give it an interesting depth of flavor.

Tepache 4

 

Cut the slices into thick chunks (yeah, I do love my knife…)

Tepache 5
There you go, the gorgeous work of a fine, loyal knife…(I so, so, so, love my knife)

Tepache 6
Pour water into the pot. If you don’t have a clay pot, use any kind of large pot…

Tepache 7
Drop in a cinnamon stick, preferably true cinnamon, if handy…

Tepache 8

 

Drop in the piloncillo, which gives anything it touches that rustic small Pueblo flavor. Just throw it all in there. No need to chop. No need to shred. It will dilute in the water as you bring it to a simmer.

Tepache 9
Oh…, and five or six whole cloves, for that touch of spice.

Tepache 10
Bring it to a boil and simmer for about 10 minutes. You know the liquid is ready when the piloncillo has diluted and you get this lovely light brown color…

Tepache 11
Light amber.

Here, you can see the color of the liquid better with my grandmother’s glass spoon. Light amber.

Gorgeous amber.

And it gets even better after you add the pineapple…

Tepache 12

 

Turn off the heat, and add the pineapple chunks.

Tepache 13
Cover the pot and let the mixture sit and rest, and begin to ferment, for two days, or about 48 hours. Any area of your kitchen is fine, preferably the warmest area, where you won’t have to move the pot around for that period of time.

Tepache 14
After two days, the liquid will begin to show some bubbles. That’s when its ready for you to pour in the beer to speed up the fermentation process. You can go the old fashioned way, and not add any beer and let it sit for another week, or more…

Tepache 15
Any lager that you like. Dos Equis works for me.

Tepache 16
Cover the mix, and let it sit for about 12 to 15 hours more.

Now, remember I just said Tepache is so simple to make, if you can keep an eye on it? Well, right after I poured the beer in this step above, I had to leave for New York. My husband was left in charge of keeping an eye on the Tepache, but he was too busy keeping an eye on our three monsters.

So the Tepache ended up tasting like vinegar.

The trick is, right after you pour the beer, don’t let it sit for more than 12 to 15 hours. After that time, strain it and either drink it or place it in a big pitcher in the refrigerator.

Tepache 17
So there I went again… and this time, we were all keeping an eye on the Tepache. It went so fast!

Now we are at it again, once more… But my lesson learned: you have to watch your own Tepache.

Print Recipe
4.25 from 4 votes

Tepache

Tepache: A home made fermented drink that comes from the state of Jalisco – also breeding ground of other Mexican symbols like Tequila, Charros and Mariachis. Tepache has a base of fresh pineapple, true cinnamon, piloncillo and water and has been drank in Mexico since Pre-Colonial times.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time2 d 12 hrs
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: beer, cinnamon, cloves, cocktail, piloncillo, pineapple, Recipe
Servings: 8 to 10 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 ripe pineapple or about 3 cups
  • 4 liters water or 16 cups
  • 1 pound piloncillo or dark brown sugar
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 5 whole cloves
  • 1 cup lager beer

Instructions

  • Using the traditional big eathenware jug (or a large pot), bring to a boil the 16 cups water along with the piloncillo, cinnamon stick, and whole cloves. Simmer, stirring once in a while, for about 10 minutes or until the piloncillo has dissolved.
  • While the water is simmering, wash the pineapple thoroughly, and remove the stem and bottom. Cut it into 2 inch cubes, without taking off its rind.
  • Once the flavored water is ready, add in the pineapple chunks and cover. Let rest for 2 days, or 48 hours, in a warm area of you kitchen. The mixture will begin to ferment and bubble on the surface. Add a cup of lager beer, stir well, and let it sit for up to 12 hours more. Don't let it ferment much longer, or you may end up with vinegar instead!
  • Strain tepache through a fine strainer or cheesecloth, and serve very cold. You can either refrigerate it or serve over ice cubes.

Ancient Ways for Comfort on Cold Days: Mexican Hot Chocolate

Story goes, that for centuries, a woman could find a mate in many Mexican regions if she was able to make a good and considerable amount of foam when making hot chocolate. Otherwise, suitors would not turn their heads to her direction regardless of any other virtue. What’s more, it was the mother of the groom to be, who judged how good the foam was.

Thankfully, my mother in law (who loves to dip Conchas into hot chocolate) didn’t abide by that tradition or I wouldn’t have gotten married. When I met my husband, the best I could whip up were some decent scrambled eggs and an extremely sweet limeade. Forget about a worthy, frothy, delicate, silky foam to top a rich tasting chocolate.

But it turns out that producing an admirable chocolate foam may be a sign of things to come: it may show how hardworking, dedicated, focused, energetic and skilled a person can be. Not only do you have to break a sweat, but also develop an effective technique and then there is also the matter of style…

No easy feat: Think cappuccino foam, with no machine. Using an ancient tool passed down through generations just for this purpose always helped, and does to this day.

molinillo

The molinillo is made from a single piece of wood, with moving rings, shapes and indentations carved into its different parts, a sturdy bottom base to rest on a pot, a soft round handle for an easy rubbing of the hands, plus gorgeous decorations. All with the aim of being able to make the best quality, and most amount, of foam.

A whisk is not the same. But if you don’t have a molinillo, you can substitute. Just use it as you would a molinillo, with a vertical tilt and rub it between your hands as if you were trying to warm them up. Photos are sometimes better than words…

frothing Mexican hot chocolate
You have to beat like mad.

Crazy, really.

frothing Mexican hot chocolate

Leaving the foam aside, what matters most is the flavor of Mexican chocolate. Which I want to get to fast, because it is about to snow again, it is cold, and there are few things that are as comforting, filling and soothing as a Mexican hot chocolate.

Mexican style chocolate bars are made with toasted cacao beans ground with white sugar, almonds, cinnamon, and sometimes vanilla. There are other variations, but I think this is the basic one. In Mexico, there are molinos, or mills, that are dedicated to doing only this and they smell like chocolaty heaven.

If you find Mexican chocolate bars already prepared, like the authentic Oaxacan chocolate of El Mayordomo (though there is an increasing number of new makers) or more easily available  and tasty ones like Chocolate Abuelita or Ibarra, you only need to add it to milk or water, heat it, mix it, and if you want some foam, work out a little.

Mexican hot chocolate disc

If you can’t find them, here is how you can get the same rich result.

Grab a couple ounces bittersweet chocolate of good quality, a small piece of True cinnamon, white sugar and almond meal…

Mexican hot chocolate ingredients

Almond meal is the already finely ground almonds. But you can also finely grind your own. Trader Joe’s has an excellent one, which as the label says, its good for baking & breading and I guess they can also add For Mexican Style Hot Chocolate too…

almond meal for Mexican hot chocolate
Place those ingredients in a sauce pan and add milk, which is my preference, or water or a combination of both, and some vanilla extract.

milk and vanilla for Mexican hot chocolate

Set the pan over medium heat, and once the chocolate dissolves remove from the heat. Beat the chocolate with a molinillo or a whisk, I really recommend that part.

In Mexico there are tall pots made specially for beating the chocolate, called chocolateros, but any sauce pan will do…

frothing Mexican hot chocolate

Forget about being worthy of a mate…. The satisfaction of drinking that hot, thick, creamy and tasty chocolate, at the same time as the frothy, cloudy and delicate foam touches your lips, is worth the while.

finished cup of Mexican hot chocolate

Mexican hot chocolate
Print Recipe
4.8 from 5 votes

Mexican Hot Chocolate

Story goes, that for centuries, a woman could find a mate in many Mexican regions if she was able to make a good and considerable amount of foam when making hot chocolate. Otherwise, suitors would not turn their heads to her direction regardless of any other virtue. What’s more, it was the mother of the groom to be, who judged how good the foam was.
Cook Time5 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almond, ceylon, cinnamon, cocktail, Dessert, mexican chocolate, milk, Recipe, vanilla
Servings: 2 cups
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups milk and/or water
  • 2 ounces Mexican style chocolate such as Abuelita, Ibarra, Mayordomo

If you can’t find Mexican chocolate substitute for:

  • 4 ounces bittersweet chocolate of good quality
  • 1 true cinnamon stick of about 2 inches
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 4 tablespoons almond meal or finely ground almonds
  • 4 tablespoons sugar more or less to taste

Instructions

  • In a saucepan add the milk or water with the Mexican chocolate or the substituting ingredients.  Set over medium heat until the chocolate has completely dissolved and the liquid is simmering. 
  • Remove the pan from heat, and if you so are inclined, beat with a whisk or molinillo, until the hot chocolate has a thick layer of foam on top. Serve while very hot. 

Notes

Chocolate Caliente