Breakfast & Brunch

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales
Print Recipe
3.67 from 6 votes

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales

Corn, Cheese and Chile Verde Tamales recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 9, Episode 10 "Sabores Norteños"
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time1 hr 40 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: anaheim chiles, cheese, chile verde, Corn, corn husks, elote, masa, Mexico, pati’s mexican table, poblanos, queso, rajas, Sonora, Sonoran, tamal, Tamales
Servings: 15 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the fresh corn masa:

  • 4 cups white corn kernels fresh or thawed frozen
  • 1/2 cup evaporated milk
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 cup corn flour for tamales or masa harina
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon vegetable oil

For the filling:

  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 cup slivered white onion
  • 1 pound fresh Anaheim chiles roasted, sweated, peeled, stemmed, seeded and cleaned, sliced into thin strips
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

To assemble the tamales:

  • 30 dried corn husks plus more for lining the steamer
  • 1 1/2 cups grated melting cheese such as asadero, quesadilla, Oaxaca, Monterey Jack, or mozzarella

Instructions

To make the fresh corn masa:

  • Coarsely puree the corn kernels along with the evaporated milk in a food processor or blender. The mixture should be a bit chunky, not completely smooth.
  • Combine the butter and sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, and beat at medium speed until very soft and creamy, about 2 minutes. Scrape down the bowl and beaters.
  • In a medium bowl, combine the masa harina, the baking soda and 1/2 teaspoon of salt.
  • Reduce the mixer speed to low and alternate adding the ground corn mixture with the masa harina mixture. Once all is incorporated, add 1 teaspoon of vegetable oil, increase the speed to medium and continue beating until completely amalgamated, creamy and fluffy, about 7 to 8 more minutes.

To make the filling:

  • Heat 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil in a skillet or sauté pan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook, stirring often, until it begins to soften, about 3 to 4 minutes. Stir in the sliced roasted Anaheim chiles, sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt, and continue to cook for another 3 to 4 minutes, stirring often, until the onions are very soft and all of the flavors have combined. Remove from the heat and scrape into a bowl.

To assemble the tamales:

  • Remove about 30 good size corn husks from the package and place in a large bowl of hot water. Soak for a couple of minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. One by one, lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. If the husks seem thin, layer a second corn husk on top. Leaving a 1 to 1 1/2-inch space at the bottom, a minimum of 1/2 inch space on the sides and a little more than that at the top, spread about 1/4 cup masa into an approximately 2×3-inch rectangle. The masa layer will be a little thicker than 1/4 inch. Place a very generous tablespoon of the Anaheim and onion filling along with a very generous tablespoon of the grated cheese lengthwise down the middle of the masa.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa swaddles the filling) and fold the joined edges to one side, rolling them around the tamal. Fold up the empty tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open. If the tamale won’t hold, you can tear strips from unused tamale wrappers and tie them around the bottom. Gently press from the bottom to the top to even the filling out, without squeezing too hard.
  • If not steaming right away, place on a plate or sheet pan, cover with plastic, and refrigerate. You can assemble them a day ahead of steaming. You can also steam them ahead and reheat (see below).
  • To prepare the tamalera or steamer: Place water in the bottom pan of a steamer, so that water is under the steamer basket or rack, and bring it to a simmer. If you want to be reassured that the water hasn’t all evaporated during the long steaming time, place a penny in it so you can hear it dancing around. Line the steamer with one or two layers of soaked corn husks.

To cook the tamales:

  • When you have all tamales ready, place them as vertically as you can in the prepared steamer with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, cover tightly with a lid, and steam covered for 1 1/2 hours. Allow the finished tamales to rest for 10 to 15 minutes. You know the tamales are ready when they come away easily from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks, you will see the moisture, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead and stored for several days in the refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.

Notes

Tamal de Elote con Rajas y Queso

Lobster Chilaquiles

Lobster Chilaquiles
Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

Lobster Chilaquiles

Lobster Chilaquiles recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 6 "El Fuerte, Magic Town"
Prep Time25 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chilaquiles, Chipotle, cilantro, corn tortillas, jalapeno, lobsters, mexican crema, morita chiles, onion, pati’s mexican table, queso fresco, tomatillos, Tomatoes, tortilla chips
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the salsa:

  • 2 to 3 dried morita or chipotle chiles
  • 1 1/2 pounds about 6 ripe Roma tomatoes
  • 1 1/2 pounds about 12 tomatillos, husked and rinsed
  • 1/2 white onion cut into large pieces
  • 2 to 3 fresh jalapeños stemmed
  • 3 unpeeled garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil

For the tortilla chips:

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 12 corn tortillas cut into triangles
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt or to taste

For the lobsters:

  • 4 1- and-a-quarter to 1-and-a-half pound live lobsters or you can substitute thawed lobster tails

For the toppings:

  • 1 cup crumbled queso fresco
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped white onion
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro
  • Mexican crema to taste

Instructions

To make the salsa:

  • Place the morita chiles in a small bowl, cover with hot water, and let them sit and soften for at least 10 minutes.
  • Place the tomatoes, tomatillos, onion chunks, jalapeños, and unpeeled garlic cloves on an aluminum foil lined baking sheet. Place under the broiler and roast 12 to 15 minutes, flipping a couple times in between, until the skin of tomatoes and tomatillos has completely blistered and charred, they seem very mushy, and their juices have started to come out. The garlic cloves and chiles must also have blackened and charred. Remove from the broiler and let cool.
  • When cool enough to handle, peel the garlic cloves and place in a blender along with the jalapeños, tomatoes, tomatillos, and onion. Take the morita chiles out of the soaking water, remove their stems and seeds, and add to the blender with the rest of the ingredients. Add salt and puree until completely smooth. If you want, you can add the chiles one at a time and taste for heat.
  • In a medium saucepan, heat one tablespoon oil over medium heat. Once hot, pour in the salsa and quickly cover partially with a lid, as it will splatter all over the place. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring a couple times in between.

To make the tortilla chips:

  • Place rack in the middle of oven and preheat to 375°F.
  • Brush a baking sheet with a couple tablespoons oil. Spread the tortilla pieces all over and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt or to taste. Bake the tortilla chips for 25 to 30 minutes or until crisp and golden brown, flipping in between. Remove from the oven when ready.

To cook the lobsters:

  • Place lobsters on a baking sheet in the freezer for 10 minutes before cooking.
  • When ready to cook, place a lobster in the center of a chopping board with the head towards you (you can put some paper towels or a thin kitchen towel under so it will be steady and will soak up any juices that come out). Hold the lobster tightly in place by the tail and place the tip of a very sharp knife where the head separates from the body, with the sharp edge of the knife facing the head. With much determination jab the tip of the knife in and pull the blade down straight between the eyes and onto the chopping board. Repeat with the other 3 lobsters.
  • Then, flip the lobsters over and cut the tail right down the middle. Clean the inner parts with a spoon.
  • Preheat an outdoor or indoor grill, or grill pan, on medium-high heat. Generously brush the lobsters with the prepared salsa. Place cut side down flat on the grill and cook for 5 to 6 minutes. Flip to the other side, and cook for another 5 to 6 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  • Leave 4 halves of the lobsters intact, just as they came off the grill. Remove the meat from the remaining 4 halves, both from the tail and the claws and coarsely chop.

To make the queso topping:

  • In a small bowl, combine the crumbled queso, white onion, and cilantro.

To assemble:

  • Pour the salsa into a large bowl, add the tortilla chips and chopped lobster meat and toss. Divide the chilaquiles among 4 plates and place one of the intact lobster halves on each. Top with the queso topping and Mexican crema to taste.

Notes

Chilaquiles con Langosta

Sinaloa Steak and Eggs over Potato Hash with Roasted Salsita

Sinaloa Steak and Eggs over Potato Hash with Roasted Salsita
Print Recipe
4.34 from 6 votes

Sinaloa Steak and Eggs over Potato Hash with Roasted Salsita

Sinaloa Steak and Eggs over Potato Hash with Roasted Salsita recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 8 “El Chepe, Railway to the Past”
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: anaheim chiles, Chorizo, Eggs, onion, pati’s mexican table, potato hash, steak
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 5 tablespoons vegetable oil divided
  • 1 pound Mexican chorizo casings removed, chopped
  • 2 cups thinly sliced white onion
  • 3/4 pound about 4 Anaheim chiles roasted, sweated, peeled, and cut into small strips
  • 2 pounds sirloin steak fat trimmed and cut into bite-sized pieces
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 6 eggs
  • Butter or oil for cooking eggs
  • Potato Hash Cake
  • Roasted Tomato and Jalapeño Salsita

Instructions

  • In a large casserole or saute pan set over medium-high heat, add 2 tablespoons of the oil. Once hot, cook the chorizo for 6 to 7 minutes, breaking it into smaller pieces with the help of a couple wooden spoons or spatulas, until crisped and browned. Transfer the cooked chorizo to a bowl, leaving the fat in the pan.
  • Put another tablespoon of oil in the same pan, add the onion and cook for 4 to 5 minutes until it wilts and starts to brown along the edges. Incorporate the roasted Anaheim chiles and cook for another minute. Scrape into the bowl with the chorizo.
  • Add the remaining 2 tablespoons of oil to the hot pan and raise the heat to high. Season the steak with salt and pepper. Once the oil is very hot, add the steak and cook for 2 to 3 minutes, turning, until browned all over. Incorporate the chorizo, chile, and onion mix, stir well, and turn off the heat.
  • Cook the eggs, sunny side up, until desired doneness. Serve with a piece of potato hash cake
  • To serve, place a piece of potato hash cake on each plate, spoon on a generous amount of the steak and chorizo mixture, and top with sunny side up eggs and roasted tomato and jalapeño salsita.

Notes

Carne y Huevos con Hash de Papa y Salsita Asada

Potato Hash Cake

Potato Hash Cake
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Potato Hash Cake

Potato Hash Cake recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 8 “El Chepe, Railway to the Past”
Prep Time30 mins
Cook Time40 mins
Total Time1 hr 10 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: onion, pati’s mexican table, potato hash, potatoes
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • Unsalted butter to grease the baking dish
  • 4 pounds red bliss potatoes peeled and grated
  • 1/2 white onion grated
  • 3 tablespoons all-purpose flour plus more to dust the baking dish
  • 3 eggs lightly beaten
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • Olive oil to brush the top of the potato hash

Instructions

  • Grease a small baking dish or quarter sheet pan with butter and dust all over with flour, shaking off any excess flour.
  • Set rack in the middle of the oven and preheat at 400°F.
  • Place the grated potatoes in a strainer and press out as much moisture as you can — repeat a couple times until almost dry. In a medium bowl, mix the strained potatoes, onion, flour, eggs, salt, pepper, and baking powder very well.
  • Press the potato mixture into the prepared baking dish. Brush olive oil generously over the top.
  • Place in the oven and bake until completely cooked and golden brown on top and bottom, about 40 to 45 minutes.

Notes

Hash de Papa al Horno

Chocolate Dipped Orejas

Orejas
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Chocolate Dipped Orejas

Chocolate Dipped Orejas recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 8 “El Chepe, Railway to the Past”
Prep Time25 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: canela, Chocolate, cinnamon, cookies, pati’s mexican table, puff pastry
Servings: 40 orejas approximately
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground canela or true cinnamon
  • 1 large pinch of kosher or sea salt
  • All-purpose flour for dusting the countertop and rolling pin
  • 1 recipe Easy Homemade Puff Pastry
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 4 ounces dark chocolate chopped, or chocolate chips
  • Rainbow sprinkles optional

Instructions

  • Place racks in the upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 425°Line 4 baking sheets with parchment paper (or cook in batches).
  • Mix the sugar, cinnamon, and salt together in a bowl.
  • Sprinkle a light coating of flour on your countertop, then spread 1 cup of the cinnamon-sugar mixture on top, right where the puff pastry will go. Place the puff pastry in the center of the cinnamon-sugar mixture. Lightly flour your rolling pin and roll the puff pastry out into a large rectangle, about 12-by-26-inches with a 1/4-inch thickness, adding a bit of flour as needed while you roll. Sprinkle the top with the remaining cinnamon-sugar mixture.
  • Mark a line horizontally across the center of the puff pastry with a knife or ruler, without cutting all the way through. Roll the bottom of the puff pastry toward the center line, creating a layered spiral. Repeat with the top of the puff pastry, rolling in toward the center line, then press both rolls towards the center. The shape should resemble a pretzel.
  • Cut in half horizontally, across the two rolls, and wrap in plastic wrap. Place in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes. Scrape any leftover cinnamon-sugar mixture onto a small plate.
  • Slice the chilled rolls into 1/2-inch slices. Dip both sides of slices in the remaining cinnamon-sugar mixture and place on a baking sheet, making sure to leave about an inch between the slices.
  • Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, then remove from the oven, flip the orejas, and return to the oven (swapping the baking sheet that was on top with the bottom). Bake for 10 to 12 minutes more, until both sides are golden brown. Transfer to a metal cooling rack and cool completely.
  • While the orejas are cooling, bring the heavy cream to a simmer in a small pot. Place the chocolate in a medium heatproof bowl and pour the hot cream over the chocolate. Let sit for 5 minutes, then stir until smooth. If using rainbow sprinkles, place them on a small plate.
  • Dip the tops of the orejas in the chocolate. If using rainbow sprinkles, lightly press the chocolate-dipped side into the sprinkles and return to the rack. Repeat with about half of the remaining cookies, leaving some plain, some chocolate dipped, and some dipped and with sprinkles.
  • Note: If you do not want to bake all of them at once, you may store the rolled oreja dough tightly wrapped in the refrigerator for a couple days, or freeze in a tight plastic bag for up to a month. Thaw in the refrigerator before baking.

Notes

Orejas con Chocolate

Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains

Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains
Print Recipe
5 from 6 votes

Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains

Traditional Capirotada with Mango and Plantains recipe from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 8, Episode 7 “Jinetes, Adventure in the Mountains”
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time1 hr 5 mins
Total Time1 hr 20 mins
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: baguette, banana, bolillo, bread, brown sugar, canela, capirotada, ceylon, cinnamon, cloves, cotija cheese, mango, pati’s mexican table, Peanuts, piloncillo, Plantains, raisins, star anise, telera
Servings: 10 to 12 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter divided
  • 5 to 6 bolillos teleras or Portuguese buns, or 1 large baguette cut into 1-inch slices
  • 1 pound piloncillo grated, or substitute for 2 cups packed dark brown sugar
  • 1 stick canela ceylon or true cinnamon
  • 1 whole star anise
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 1/4 cup raisins
  • 2 quarts (or 8 cups) water
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 3 ripe plantains peeled and cut into 1/2-inch diagonal slices (about 3 cups)
  • 1 to 2 large ripe mangoes peeled and sliced (about 2 cups)
  • 1 cup finely crumbled or grated queso Cotija
  • 2/3 cups roasted peanuts
  • Confectioners’ sugar for serving

Instructions

  • Place racks on upper and lower thirds of the oven and preheat to 350°F.
  • Melt 4 tablespoons of the butter in a small pan. Brush the surface of two large baking sheets with some of the melted butter and place the bread slices onto the buttered baking sheets in a single layer. Use the remaining butter to brush on top of the bread slices. Bake for 20 minutes until golden brown on the bottom and remove from the oven.
  • In a medium saucepan, place the piloncillo, cinnamon, star anise, cloves, and raisins, cover with the 8 cups of water, and set over medium-high heat. Once it comes to a simmer, stir occasionally, and let simmer for 30 minutes or until reduced by half. Turn off the heat. With a slotted spoon, remove the cinnamon stick, star anise, and, cloves and discard. Set the piloncillo syrup aside.
  • Add 1 tablespoon butter and 1 tablespoon oil to a large saute pan set over medium-high heat. Once the pan is hot, cook the plantain slices in a couple batches for about a minute per side, or until golden brown on both sides. Place the browned plantains on a paper towel covered plate and set aside.
  • Use the remaining tablespoon of butter to grease a 9×13-inch baking dish. Add a third of the bread to make the first layer covering the bottom of the baking dish. Distribute all around half of the plantains, half of the mango, half of the Cotija, and half of the peanuts. Pour on about a third of the piloncillo syrup. Start another layer, adding a third of the bread and the remaining half of the plantains, mango, Cotija, and peanuts. Pour another third of the syrup, trying to get all of the raisins in. Finally, cover with the remaining third of the bread and pour the rest of the syrup on top. Cover with aluminum foil.
  • Set oven rack in the middle of the oven. Bake the capirotada for 25 minutes, then remove it from the oven, carefully uncover, and press down with a spatula so it all bakes in the syrup. Cover again with aluminum foil and return to the oven. After another 25 minutes, carefully remove the foil, and bake for about 10 minutes more so the top browns. Cool slightly before serving and sprinkle with confectioners’ sugar.

Notes

Capirotada con Mango y Plátano Macho

Border Pintos

Border Pintos
Print Recipe
4.72 from 7 votes

Border Pintos

Border Pintos from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7,  Episode 4 "Baja Breakfast"
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time1 hr 20 mins
Course: Breakfast, Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Chorizo, pati's mexican table, pinto beans
Servings: 6 to 8 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 pound pinto beans rinsed
  • 1/2 white onion
  • 2 teaspoons kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/2 pound Mexican chorizo casings removed, chopped
  • 1/2 pound thick sliced bacon chopped
  • 1 ripe Roma tomato cored and diced
  • 2 to 3 poblano chiles charred, sweated, skin removed, cut into strips
  • 1 cup queso fresco crumbled, for garnish

Instructions

To cook the pintos:

  • Place rinsed pintos in a large pot, cover with 3 liters of water, drop in the onion half and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce heat to medium and keep at a constant simmer, covering partially with a lid, for an hour. Check the beans from time to time to make sure they are not drying out. If they are, add a couple cups of hot water. Once they are cooked and soft, and should be very soupy, add the salt, remove the onion, stir and set aside.

Note:

  • You may substitute for 2 15-ounce cans of already cooked pintos. Heat with 2 cups water, season with salt to taste and set aside.

To make the Border Pintos:

  • Heat the oil in an extended skillet or casserole over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the chorizo and cook for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring occasionally, until it has started to brown and has rendered its fat. Add the bacon, stir and cook for 3 to 4 minutes, until it begins to brown. Add the tomato and poblanos, stir and cook for a couple minutes. Incorporate the cooked pintos and all their cooking broth, let them come to a simmer, then reduce to medium heat and cook for 7 to 8 minutes. Until the beans are nicely seasoned, all the flavors have come together, and you see some lovely puddles of red fat over the top. Turn off heat. Crumble the queso fresco over the top before serving.

Notes

Frijoles Fronterizos

Dance with your Wife Guajillo Migas

Dance with your Wife Guajillo Migas
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Dance with your Wife Guajillo Migas

Dance with your Wife Guajillo Migas recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 4 "Baja Breakfast"
Prep Time20 mins
Cook Time25 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, Brunch, Eggs, Guajillo, Mexican, Migas, Tomato
Servings: 4 to 5 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the tortilla chips:

  • 12 Corn Tortillas cut into rectangles or bite size pieces
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • Kosher or sea salt to season the chips

For the guajillo salsa:

  • 3 guajillo chiles stemmed and seeded
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 3/4 pound (or 12 ounces) ripe Roma tomatoes
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped cilantro leaves and upper part of the stems
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt

For the migas:

  • 5 large eggs lightly beaten
  • 3 scallions white and light green parts thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1 ripe avocado pitted and sliced

Instructions

To make the tortilla chips:

  • Heat enough oil to reach 1” in a heavy bottomed skillet or casserole, set over medium heat, for at least 5 minutes. Test the oil with a tortilla piece, once the oil is actively bubbling around the tortilla, it is ready. Add a batch of the cut tortillas without overcrowding the pan; they shouldn’t be on top of each other. Fry for 2 to 3 minutes, until they crisp up and achieve a golden color (don’t let them brown or they will burn). Remove with a slotted spoon or spider and place on a plate covered with paper towels to drain. Immediately sprinkle on salt to taste and continue with the rest of the tortilla pieces in batches until done. Reserve the frying oil.

To make the guajillo salsa:

  • Place the chiles, garlic and tomatoes in a saucepan, cover with water and set over medium-high heat. Simmer for 10 minutes, until the tomatoes are cooked and mushy, and the chiles are rehydrated. Place the cooked chiles, garlic and tomatoes into the jar of a blender, along with ½ cup of their cooking liquid, the cilantro, and salt, and puree until completely smooth.

To make the migas:

  • In an extended skillet or casserole, heat 1 tablespoon of the oil from frying the tortilla pieces and set over medium heat. Once hot, add all the tortilla chips and let them reheat for a minute or two. Pour in the beaten eggs, and once they begin to set, add the guajillo salsa. Gently begin to fold until everything is covered with the salsa, and the eggs are cooked, just a couple minutes. Remove from the heat, top with scallions, cilantro and avocado. Serve.

Notes

Baila con tu Mujer

Dulce de Leche Ricotta Pancakes

Dulce de Leche Caramel Ricotta Pancakes
Print Recipe
4 from 6 votes

Dulce de Leche Ricotta Pancakes

Dulce de Leche Ricotta Pancakes from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 4 "Baja Breakfast"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: Cajeta, Caramel, Dulce de Leche, pancakes, pati's mexican table, ricotta
Servings: 10 to 12 small pancakes
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup ricotta or requesón cheese
  • 1 cup Dulce de Leche or Cajeta
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon lime zest
  • Butter or vegetable oil to cook pancakes
  • confectioners' sugar
  • Fruit of your choice such as berries, mango or bananas

Instructions

  • In a medium bowl, mix the ricotta cheese, Dulce de Leche and eggs until smooth. Add the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt, mix well until completely incorporated. Lastly, add the lime juice and zest, mix again.
  • Preheat a large nonstick skillet or griddle over medium-low heat for at least 5 minutes. Once hot, add enough butter or oil to cover surface. Ladle ¼ cup pancake batter per pancake, cook for 2 to 3 minutes on the first side, flip and cook for 1 to 2 minutes on the second side. Serve sprinkled with confectioners’ sugar and fruit of your choice.

Notes

Pancakes de Ricotta con Dulce de Leche

Bananas and Raspberries in Lime Syrup

Bananas and Raspberries in Lime Syrup
Print Recipe
4.6 from 5 votes

Bananas and Raspberries in Lime Syrup

Bananas and Raspberries in Lime Syrup from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 4 "Baja Breakfast"
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: banana, fruit, lime, pati's mexican table, raspberries
Servings: 4 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 bananas peeled, sliced
  • 1 cup raspberries
  • 1 tablespoon lime juice
  • 1 teaspoon lime zest
  • 1 tablespoon grated piloncillo or brown sugar or to taste
  • 1 tablespoons fresh mint torn

Instructions

  • Add banana and raspberries to a medium bowl. Sprinkle in the lime juice, lime zest, and piloncillo over the fruit and toss until coated. Sprinkle with fresh mint.

Notes

Plátano y Frambuesas con Jarabe de Limón

Dulce de Leche Banana Bread

Dulce de Leche Caramel Banana Bread
Print Recipe
3.72 from 7 votes

Dulce de Leche Banana Bread

Dulce de Leche Banana Bread from Pati’s Mexican Table Season 7, Episode 2 "Tijuana: Stories from the Border"
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time1 hr
Total Time1 hr 15 mins
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: American, Mexican
Keyword: banana bread, Cajeta, Dulce de Leche, pati's mexican table
Servings: 8 to 10 Servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup (or 1 stick) unsalted butter at room temperature plus more to grease the pan
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 1/2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 2 ripe bananas peeled, sliced and completely mashed
  • 1/2 cup Dulce de Leche or Cajeta
  • 1/4 cup boiling water
  • For garnish confectioners' sugar

Instructions

  • Place rack in the middle of the oven and preheat to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grease a 9”x5” nonstick loaf pan with butter.
  • In the bowl of a standing mixer, set with the paddle attachment, beat the butter at medium speed until light and fluffy, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the brown sugar and granulated sugar and continue beating until smooth. Add the eggs and vanilla and continue beating for a couple minutes.
  • In a bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt. Reduce the mixer speed to low, and add the flour mixture ¼ cup at a time. Continue beating until well incorporated. You will have a very dry batter.
  • Remove a third of the batter and set aside in a separate bowl. Add the mashed bananas to the remaining batter in the mixer bowl and continue beating until the batter is fluffy and mixed. Pour the banana batter into the prepared pan.
  • Rinse the mixer bowl and paddle attachment. Add the reserved batter and the Dulce de Leche to the mixer bowl and beat at medium speed, for a minute, until blended. Reduce speed, pour in the boiling water and continue beating until completely smooth. Pour the dulce de leche caramel batter in the pan over the banana batter.
  • Place in the oven and bake for an hour, until the top is puffed up, golden brown and a toothpick comes out moist but not wet on a corner of the bread. Remove from the oven, let cool and flip out of the pan onto a platter. Garnish with confectioners’ sugar. Once it has cooled completely, cover it, so it retains and even gains more moisture.

Notes

Pan de Plátano con Dulce de Leche

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tamales

Just when you think you completely understand something, life proves you wrong. Does that happen to you? It happens to me all the time, especially when it comes to food.

A cuisine as rich and diverse as Mexico’s needs for us to make an effort to preserve what has been passed on. But, you also have to keep an open mind to new ideas that may in turn become classics.

In that sense, I find the kitchen to be one of the most humbling places because food is always growing and evolving and taking you along, if you let it. You get to constantly learn, apply what you learn, share it, and then start all over again.

Take tamales for example. I have made countless kinds from all regions of Mexico and from different historical times. I have wrapped them in dried and fresh corn husks, banana leaves, hoja santa leaves…practically any and every edible leaf I know of in Mexico. I have learned to make them with raw masa, with masa colada, with rice flour masa, with normal wheat flour masa and even with no masa! I have done savory and sweet, with fillings that range from picadillo to marzipan and beyond. You name it, I have probably tried it.

I thought I had the tamales from the city of Oaxaca nailed down. Then, a few months ago, as we were filming Season 6 of Pati’s Mexican Table there, I was amazed to try a new tamal at Criollo, Chef Luis Arellano’s new restaurant. Its masa was made with pumpkin and filled with sweet refried beans laced with piloncillo. The only way to describe it is brilliant!

Back in my kitchen, I was inspired by the possibility of not only flavoring the masa, but enriching it with a starchy vegetable to lend taste, consistency and color. I came up with this sweet potato tamal filled with savory refried beans.

When the time came to test and play around with it, I was reminded of how important it is to appreciate the lessons that have stood the test of time. In the case of tamales: to review our technique for steaming, for assembling, for achieving a good masa. So we can still call our new creation something worthy of the name TAMAL.

Given the addition of the starchy sweet potatoes, I ended up having to test the idea quite a few times to achieve a very fluffy, yet tasty masa.

In the end, I am very happy with this one! The masa is puffy and moist, and its barely sweet flavor contrasts nicely with the savory, earthy taste of the refried beans. I also took the liberty of drizzling them with crema and topping with salty queso fresco.

And, because my friends from FUD USA and I want to hear what your favorite tamales are, and mostly, we want you to be able to make them for the holidays, we’re giving away 5 tamaleras and each with a copy of my cookbook. Are you in? Go right here to enter.

Pati Jinich sweet potato black bean tamales
Print Recipe
5 from 4 votes

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tamales

I thought I had the tamales from the city of Oaxaca nailed down. Then, a few months ago, as we were filming Season 6 of Pati’s Mexican Table there, I was amazed to try a new tamal at Criollo, Chef Luis Arellano’s new restaurant. Its masa was made with pumpkin and filled with sweet refried beans laced with piloncillo. The only way to describe it is brilliant! Back in my kitchen, I was inspired by the possibility of not only flavoring the masa, but enriching it with a starchy vegetable to lend taste, consistency and color. I came up with this sweet potato tamal filled with savory refried beans.
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time55 mins
Total Time2 hrs 25 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: black beans, pati's mexican table, queso fresco, sweet potato, Tamales
Servings: 12 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds sweet potatoes
  • 1 cup lard or vegetable shortening
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 2/3 cups corn masa flour or masa harina (such as Maseca)
  • 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable broth
  • 24 dried corn husks
  • 2 cups refried beans
  • 1 cup Mexican crema
  • 1 cup queso fresco crumbled

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Wrap the sweet potatoes in aluminum foil. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes or until completely cooked and soft. Remove from the oven. When cool enough to handle, cut open and scoop out the cooked pulp into a bowl. Set aside to cool.

To make the tamal masa:

  • Place the lard or vegetable shortening and 1/2 teaspoon of salt into a mixer, and beat over medium speed until very light, about 1 minute. Reduce speed to low, add baking powder and sugar, and take turns adding the corn masa flour and the broth. Raise speed back to medium and continue beating another 6 to 7 minutes, until the dough is homogeneous. In batches, add the cooled sweet potato pulp and continue beating for another 5 to 6 minutes, until the masa looks fluffed up.

To assemble the tamales:

  • Soak the dried corn husks in hot water for a couple minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. Lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. Spread about 1/3 cup masa into about a 2” to 3” square, the layer should be about 1/4” thick, leaving a border of at least 1/2” on the sides. Place about 2 teaspoons of refried beans in the middle of the masa square.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa starts to swaddle the filling) and fold them to one side, rolling them in same direction around tamal. Fold up the empty section of the husk with the tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open. Gently squeeze from the bottom to the top to even the filling out without pressing to hard. As you assemble all the tamales, place them as upright as you can in a container.

To prepare the tamalera or steamer:

  • Place water in the bottom pan of a steamer, so that water is under the steamer basket or rack, and bring it to a simmer. Line the steamer with one or two layers of soaked corn husks.

To cook the tamales:

  • When you have all tamales ready, place them as vertically as you can, into the prepared steamer with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, and steam covered with a lid for 55 minutes to an hour. You know the tamales are ready when they come easily free from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks – you will see the moisture, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead several days before and stored in refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.
  • You can serve with a spoonful of Mexican crema and crumbled queso fresco on top.

Notes

Tamales de Camote con Frijol

Señor Breakfast Sandwich

Print Recipe
5 from 5 votes

Señor Breakfast Sandwich

Señor Breakfast Sandwich recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 12 "Cheesy" 
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chipotles in adobo, Eggs, ham, Oaxaca cheese, pati's mexican table
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the chipotle béchamel:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter plus more to butter baking sheet
  • 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
  • 1 1/3 cup cold milk
  • 1 tablespoon dijon mustard
  • 2 tablespoons sauce from chipotles in adobo sauce or chopped chipotles in adobo
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt more to taste
  • Freshly ground black pepper to taste

For the sandwiches:

  • 8 slices of sandwich bread
  • 1 1/3 cup shredded Oaxaca cheese or 8 slices of muenster
  • 8 thin slices of baked ham
  • 8 eggs
  • Vegetable oil for cooking the eggs
  • Slices of ripe avocado for garnish

Instructions

To make the chipotle béchamel:

  • In a small saucepan set over medium heat, melt the butter. Once it begins to bubble, incorporate the flour. Cook for a couple of minutes, stirring constantly, until it turns into a paste and begins to smell toasty, and the color begins to turn amber.
  • Add the cold milk and continue cooking, stirring occasionally, until the sauce thickens, another 2 to 3 minutes. Add the Dijon, chipotles in adobo, salt, and pepper to taste, and mix well. Once it has reached the desired thickness, about the consistency of a pudding, turn off the heat and set aside.

To make the sandwiches:

  • Pre-heat the oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Butter a baking sheet.
  • Place the slices of bread on the baking sheet and spread a couple tablespoons of the chipotle béchamel onto 4 slices. Put a couple slices of ham onto each of the other 4 slices of bread. Top all 8 slices of bread with cheese, splitting about 1/3 cup of shredded cheese per sandwich. Place in the oven and bake until bread is toasty and cheese is melted, about 5 to 6 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, set small skillet over low heat. Once hot, add a few drops of oil. Once the oil is hot, 2 at a time, crack the eggs into the skillet and season with salt and pepper. Cover with a lid and cook until desired doneness. I do about 4 minutes for sunny side up eggs with runny yolks and set egg whites.
  • Remove the sandwiches from oven, close the sandwiches and put a pair of sunny side up eggs on top.

Notes

Señor Sándwich

Sopes

Pati Jinich sopes
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Sopes

Sopes recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 10 "How I Got to Now"
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time8 mins
Total Time18 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cotija, queso fresco, refried beans, sopes, Tomatillo Salsita
Servings: 12 sopes
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

To make the Sopes:

  • 2 cups masa harina or corn tortilla flour such as Maseca
  • 2 cups water more if needed
  • Pinch kosher or coarse sea salt

To serve:

Instructions

  • Heat a comal or skillet over medium heat until very hot.

To make the sopes:

  • Combine the masa harina, water and salt, kneading in a revolving motion with your hands. Knead for a couple of minutes, until dough is smooth and has no lumps. If it feels too dry, add a bit more water.
  • Divide the dough into 12 balls, each about 2-inches in diameter. Line the bottom of a tortilla press with circles cut from a thin plastic bag (like the ones from the produce section of your grocery store). One at a time, place a ball of dough onto the plastic lining the bottom of the tortilla press, and top with another layer of plastic. Press down to make a flat disk as thick as a pancake, about 1/4-inch thick (much thicker than a tortilla). You can also flatten and form them by hand. Repeat with all 12 balls.
  • As you make them, place each sope on the hot comal or skillet. Let them cook about one to two minutes on each side, until opaque and speckled, and they can be flipped without sticking.
  • Take them off the comal and place them on a chopping board. Using a kitchen towel to protect your fingers, make a rim around each sope by pressing and pinching with your fingers along the edges. Return them to the comal or skillet, and let them cook for one or two more minutes per side, until thoroughly cooked.
  • If eaten the same day, they may be kept wrapped in a clean kitchen towel. If not, wrap them in a kitchen towel or paper towel, and store inside a closed plastic bag in the refrigerator. They will keep for up to 3 days, afterwards they will turn too hard. Reheat on hot comal or skillet for a couple minutes before eating. They can also be frozen and kept for months.

To serve:

  • Once the sopes have been thoroughly cooked and warmed, place on a platter and add a generous tablespoon of refried beans, shredded lettuce, crumbled cheese, chopped onion and Quick Roasted Salsita. Salsa may be left on the side for people to add as much as they like.

Eggs in Salsa Martajada

Pati Jinich eggs in salsa martajada
Print Recipe
3.84 from 6 votes

Eggs in Salsa Martajada

Eggs in Salsa Martajada recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 9 "Oaxaca Breakfast: Messy & Delicious"
Prep Time25 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: banana chiles, chiles de agua, Eggs, pati's mexican table, Tomatoes
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds ripe Roma tomatoes
  • 5 banana chiles or 2 chiles de agua
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt plus more to season the eggs
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil plus 2 teaspoons to cook the eggs
  • 12 eggs

Instructions

  • Place the tomatoes and chiles on a sheet pan and under the broiler, or on an already heated comal, griddle or skillet set over medium heat. Roast or char for 10 minutes, flipping in between, until completely charred, cooked and mushy.
  • Place the chiles in a plastic bag, close tightly and let them sweat. After 10 to 15 minutes, peel off their skin under a thin stream of water. Then make a slit down the sides of the chiles with a knife and remove the seeds. Cut them into horizontal slices.
  • In the jar of a blender, place the charred tomatoes and their juices, 1 of the cleaned banana peppers, and the salt. Pulse for only a few seconds, until coarse, rustic and chunky (not a smooth puree).
  • Heat the oil in a large skillet or casserole set over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the salsa and incorporate the remaining slices of chile. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, beat the eggs in 2 batches of 6 eggs each and season with salt. Heat one teaspoon oil in a non-stick skillet set over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the first batch of 6 scrambled eggs and cook as you would a messy omelet. Once cooked but still tender, about 2 to 3 minutes later, scrape onto casserole with salsa. Repeat with the second batch of eggs. Cover the eggs with the salsa and serve.

Notes

Huevos en Salsa Martajada

Oaxaca Style Refried Beans

Print Recipe
4.25 from 8 votes

Oaxaca Style Refried Beans

Oaxaca Style Refried Beans recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 9 "Oaxaca Breakfast: Messy & Delicious"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time2 hrs
Total Time2 hrs 5 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: black beans, epazote, pati's mexican table, queso fresco, refried beans
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 pound black beans rinsed
  • 1 white onion halved
  • 1 tablespoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • A couple sprigs fresh epazote or cilantro
  • 5 dried avocado leaves
  • 3 dried chiles de arbol
  • 2 tablespoons lard or vegetable oil
  • 1/2 cup white onion finely chopped
  • For garnish queso fresco
  • For garnish ripe avocado

Instructions

  • Place the black beans and the onion in a large soup pot or casserole and add enough water to cover by at least 2- to 3-inches. Bring to a rolling boil over high heat and cover with a lid, leaving it slightly open. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook for an hour to an hour and 15 minutes – making sure there is always sufficient water (if you need to add a cup, make sure it is boiling hot).
  • Once the beans are cooked and tender, add 1 tablespoon salt and a couple sprigs of fresh epazote or cilantro. Cook for another 15 minutes. Turn off heat.
  • In a hot comal or skillet set over medium heat, toast the avocado leaves and chiles de arbol for a couple of minutes until fragrant and browned, flipping as they toast. Remove from the heat. Break the leaves into pieces. Remove the stem from the chiles and break into pieces without discarding the seeds.
  • Working in batches if necessary, add the cooked beans and at least 1 1/2 cups of their cooking liquid (or add water if need be) to the jar of a blender, as well as the avocado leaves and chiles. Puree until a little chunky.
  • In a large skillet or casserole set over medium-high heat, heat the lard or vegetable oil. Once hot, but not smoking, add the chopped onion. Cook until translucent and edges are beginning to brown, about 6 to 7 minutes. Incorporate pureed beans and reduce heat to medium. Cook, stirring occasionally, until they thicken to your liking. I cook them for about 10 to 12 minutes.

Notes

Frijoles Oaxaqueños

Pan de Yema

Pati Jinich Pan de Yema
Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Pan de Yema

Pan de Yema recipe from Pati's Mexican Table, Season 6 Episode 9 "Oaxaca Breakfast: Messy & Delicious"
Prep Time3 hrs
Cook Time20 mins
Total Time3 hrs 20 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: bread, pati's mexican table
Servings: 16 buns
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 envelopes active dry yeast granules
  • 2/3 cup sugar, plus 1 teaspoon
  • 1 1/4 cup lukewarm water
  • 6 cups all-purpose flour, divided,
    plus more for shaping dough
  • 1 cup unsalted butter, plus more for greasing a large bowl and baking sheets
  • 9 egg yolks
  • 2 large eggs plus 1 for egg wash
  • Pinch of kosher or coarse sea salt

Instructions

  • In a small bowl, combine the yeast granules with the 1 teaspoon of sugar and the lukewarm water (make sure it is not cold or hot, or the yeast will not react). Stir, let it sit in a warm area of your kitchen with no wind drafts, and after a few minutes, mix to dissolve. Let it sit again (in the same place) for a couple minutes more, until the mixture has reacted and looks frothy on top. Incorporate 1 cup of the flour and mix well. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and let it rise for an hour.
  • In a mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, beat the butter with the 2/3 cup sugar on medium speed until soft and creamy. Reduce speed to low, add yeast mixture along with the egg yolks, 2 eggs, the rest of the flour, and a pinch of salt.
  • After a few minutes, switch the paddle attachment for the hook attachment. Let the mixer knead the dough on low to medium speed for about 10 to 12 minutes, until the dough is very soft, smooth and shiny, and you can gather it into a ball.
  • Butter a large bowl. Gather the dough into a ball and place it in the bowl. Cover with a clean kitchen towel and place in the warm area of your kitchen with no drafts. Let it rise for about an hour until it doubles in size.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit and butter 3 baking sheets.
  • Uncover the dough and punch it down. Divide it in half, and consecutively halve the pieces until you have 16 pieces of dough. Roll each one into a ball and set on the buttered baking sheets. Place in the warm area of your kitchen for 45 minutes to an hour for a final rise.
  • In a small bowl, beat the remaining egg with a tablespoon of water. Make a 3 slashes on the top of each bun and brush with egg wash. Bake for 20 minutes, until cooked through and browned on top.

Notes

Oaxacan Yolk Bread

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tamales

Pati Jinich sweet potato and black bean tamales
Print Recipe
4 from 6 votes

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tamales

Sweet Potato and Black Bean Tamales recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 6, Episode 2 "History of Oaxaca Cuisine"
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time55 mins
Total Time2 hrs 25 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: masa, mexican crema, pati's mexican table, sweet potato, Tamales
Servings: 12 to 16 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds sweet potatoes
  • 1 cup lard or vegetable shortening
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 2/3 cups corn masa flour or masa harina (such as Maseca)
  • 1/2 cup chicken or vegetable broth
  • 24 dried corn husks
  • 2 cups refried beans
  • 1 cup Mexican crema
  • 1 cup queso fresco crumbled

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Wrap the sweet potatoes in aluminum foil. Bake for 45 to 50 minutes or until completely cooked and soft. Remove from the oven. When cool enough to handle, cut open and scoop out the cooked pulp into a bowl. Set aside to cool.

To make the tamal masa:

  • Place the lard or vegetable shortening and 1/2 teaspoon of salt into a mixer, and beat over medium speed until very light, about 1 minute. Reduce speed to low, add baking powder and sugar, and take turns adding the corn masa flour and the broth. Raise speed back to medium and continue beating another 6 to 7 minutes, until the dough is homogeneous. In batches, add the cooled sweet potato pulp and continue beating for another 5 to 6 minutes, until the masa looks fluffed up.

To assemble the tamales:

  • Soak the dried corn husks in hot water for a couple minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. Lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. Spread about 1/3 cup masa into about a 2” to 3” square, the layer should be about 1/4” thick, leaving a border of at least 1/2” on the sides. Place about 2 teaspoons of refried beans in the middle of the masa square.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa starts to swaddle the filling) and fold them to one side, rolling them in same direction around tamal. Fold up the empty section of the husk with the tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open. Gently squeeze from the bottom to the top to even the filling out without pressing to hard. As you assemble all the tamales, place them as upright as you can in a container.

To prepare the tamalera or steamer:

  • Place water in the bottom pan of a steamer, so that water is under the steamer basket or rack, and bring it to a simmer. Line the steamer with one or two layers of soaked corn husks.

To cook the tamales:

  • When you have all tamales ready, place them as vertically as you can, into the prepared steamer with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, and steam covered with a lid for 55 minutes to an hour. You know the tamales are ready when they come easily free from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks – you will see the moisture, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead several days before and stored in refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.
  • You can serve with a spoonful of Mexican crema and crumbled queso fresco on top.

Notes

Tamales de Camote con Frijol

Tamales Coloraditos

Tamales are practically required on so many December holidays. Take Posadas. And Christmas. Not to mention New Year’s. Wait, of course, that spills over to January with Día de Reyes. Then it continues in February for Día de la Candelaria

There’s also any morning after a big Mexican wedding… and all Mexican weddings are big! I could go on with every month of the year, but tamales are especially craved in December.

Of course, tamales are also everyday food for Mexicans. All sorts of tamales are found daily in lots of places, from markets, to food stands, to restaurants. Why then, if they can be eaten everyday, is there that crucial need for having tamales in December?

Well, I do not know. But what I can say is that I can eat tamales every day of the year and then feel the desperate need to have them for Christmas. To the point that it can be a pretty sad Christmas if tamales aren’t there.

Since the tamal love is spreading beyond Mexico, let me give you the recipe for a tamal I am pretty sure you haven’t tried. Unless you are Norteño, from the Mexican north.

The tamal coloradito, which translates to “infused with color,” takes its name from the filling of meat cooked in a mole sauce by the same name, coloradito. It has an intense color and a deep, rich, complex taste. It is made with ancho and guajillo chiles, tomatoes, onion, garlic, cinnamon, cumin and cloves. Then it coats the meat and simmers with olives, almonds and raisins, resulting in a teasingly sweet/spicy, savory and crunchy mix. The full-blown exotic flavors of the filling contrast beautifully with the mild, fluffy tamal dough.

It seems to me that this tamal is particularly festive because, aside from tamales screaming out for celebration on their own, even with no filling, this one is filled with quite a stunner of a mole sauce. And moles are cause for celebration, too! Pair the two into one bite, and you have a happy crowd.

tamales coloraditos
Print Recipe
4.6 from 5 votes

Tamales Coloraditos

The tamal coloradito, which translates to "infused with color," takes its name from the filling of meat cooked in a mole sauce by the same name, coloradito. It has an intense color and a deep, rich, complex taste. It is made with ancho and guajillo chiles, tomatoes, onion, garlic, cinnamon, cumin and cloves. Then it coats the meat and simmers with olives, almonds and raisins, resulting in a teasingly sweet/spicy, savory and crunchy mix. The full-blown exotic flavors of the filling contrast beautifully with the mild, fluffy tamal dough.
Prep Time1 hr
Cook Time50 mins
Total Time1 hr 50 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Ancho, Coloraditos, Guajillo, Mole, pork, Tamales, Tomato, Tomatoes
Servings: 25 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the tamal dough or masa:

  • 1 cup lard vegetable shortening, or seasoned oil*
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 3 1/2 cups homemade chicken broth or store bought, divided, more as needed
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 pound (about 3 1/4 cups) instant corn masa flour preferably for tamales

For the filling:

  • 3 guajillo chiles stemmed, halved and seeded
  • 3 ancho chiles stemmed, halved and seeded
  • 1 ripe Roma tomato
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano preferably Mexican
  • 2 whole cloves
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground ceylon cinnamon or canela
  • Pinch cumin
  • 1 tablespoon white distilled vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/3 cup white onion chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic finely chopped
  • 1 pound pork tenderloin diced **
  • 3/4 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • Freshly ground pepper to taste
  • 1 1/2 cups homemade chicken broth or store bought
  • 1/3 cup raisins
  • 1/3 cup slivered almonds
  • 1/3 cup manzanilla olives stuffed with pimientos chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 25 dried corn husks

Instructions

To make the tamal dough or masa:

  • Place the lard or vegetable shortening in a mixer and beat until very light, about 1 minute. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt and a tablespoon of the broth and continue to beat until it is white and fluffy, about 2 more minutes. Add the baking powder and beat in, then take turns adding the instant corn masa and the broth in 3 or 4 additions. Continue beating for about 10 minutes at medium speed, until the dough is homogeneous and very fluffy and aerated.
  • To test to see if the tamal masa is ready, drop 1/2 teaspoon into a cup of cold water. It should float. If it does not, beat for an additional 4 or 5 minutes and do the test again.

To make the filling:

  • Heat a comal or skillet over medium heat and toast the guajillo and ancho chiles for about 1 minute, flipping them over a few times, until they become more pliable, lightly toasted, fragrant and their inner skin turns opaque. Transfer to a medium saucepan. Add the tomato, cover with water and bring to a simmer over medium heat. Simmer for 10 to 12 minutes, or until the tomato is very soft and the chiles are fully hydrated, plumped up and soft.
  • Place the chiles, tomato and 1/2 cup of the chile simmering water in a blender jar. Add the oregano, whole cloves, cinnamon, cumin and vinegar, and puree until smooth.
  • Heat the oil over medium high heat in a large, deep skillet. Add the onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender and the edges begin to brown, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the meat, season with salt and pepper, and cook, stirring occasionally, until lightly browned, about 8 to 10 minutes.
  • Reduce heat to medium, pour the chile puree over the meat, and stir in the broth. Add the raisins, almonds, olives and brown sugar, stir together, reduce the heat to medium low, cover and cook for 12 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. The mixture should cook down and have the consistency of chile con carne.

To assemble the tamales:

  • Soak the dried corn husks in hot water for a couple minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. Lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. Spread about 3 tablespoons of masa into about a 2 to 3-inch square, the layer should be about 1/4-inch thick, leaving a border of at least 1/2-inch on the sides. Place 1 tablespoon of filling in the middle of the masa square.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa starts to swaddle the filling) and fold the folded sides to one side, rolling them in same direction around tamal. Fold up the empty section of the husk, with the tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open.
  • Assemble all the tamales and place them as vertically as you can in a container.

To prepare the tamalera or steamer:

  • Place water in the bottom pan of a steamer (so that water is under the steamer) and bring it to a simmer. Line the steamer with one or two layers of soaked corn husks.

To cook the tamales:

  • When you have all tamales ready, place them, again as vertically as you can, into the prepared steamer with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, and steam covered with a lid for 50 minutes to an hour. You know the tamales are ready when they come easily free from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks, you will see the moisture, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead several days before and stored in refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.
  • * Note: To make seasoned oil, in a medium saucepan, heat 1 cup vegetable oil over medium heat, add a thick slice of onion and 4 garlic cloves. Cook for 15 minutes until completely browned. Remove onion and garlic before using the oil.
  • ** Note: You can substitute the pork for any other meat of your choice, you can also combine different kinds of meat, like ground beef and diced pork, like my mother does.

Fried Egg Taco with Pine Nut Pipián

fried egg taco
Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Fried Egg Taco with Pine Nut Pipián

Fried Egg Taco with Pine Nut Pipián recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 5, Episode 13 “José Andrés Takes Over”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Chorizo, fried egg, pickled red onions, Pine Nut Pipián, radish, tacos
Servings: 4 tacos
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

Instructions

  • Prepare the chorizo: With a knife cut the chorizo link on one side, allowing it to split open. Squeeze the meat from the casing. In a pot over medium heat, gently cook the chorizo for 4 to 5 minutes, until cooked through and lightly browned. Set aside.
  • Heat a non-stick pan over medium heat. Add a generous amount of olive oil. Once the pan is hot, gently crack open the egg into the middle of the oil, tilting the pan to allow the yolk to be centered. Cook on medium heat, using a slotted spoon to prevent egg from sticking to the pan. Cover if needed to allow the white to cook through, leaving the yolk runny, about 1 1/2 minutes. Using the slotted spoon, scoop egg out of the frying oil, dab on a towel to allow any excess oil to drain away, and place the fried egg on a plate. Repeat cooking process for each of the four eggs.
  • Cut off a 4-inch piece from the baguette. Slice off the crust and then slice the inner bread into 1/2-inch strips. Toast in a pan with oil.
  • Top each egg taco with slice of toasted bread, radish, cilantro, Pickled Red Onion Slices, Pine Nut Pipián, and chorizo. Serve immediately.

Notes

Recipe courtesy José Andrés

Chicken in Green Salsa Tamal

chicken in green salsa tamal
Print Recipe
4.67 from 6 votes

Chicken in Green Salsa Tamal

Chicken in Green Salsa Tamal recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 5 “Tamaliza!”
Prep Time45 mins
Cook Time35 mins
Total Time1 hr 20 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chicken, masa, pati's mexican table, salsa verde, Tamales
Servings: 18 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the tamal dough or masa:

  • 3/4 cup lard, vegetable shortening, or seasoned oil (see note at end of recipe)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon cold water
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 pound (about 3 1/4 cups) instant corn masa flour (masa harina) for tortillas or tamales
  • 3 1/2 cups homemade chicken broth add more if needed

For the filling:

  • 1 batch salsa verde
  • 2 cups shredded cooked chicken from homemade chicken broth

To assemble the tamales:

  • 25 dried corn husks soaking in hot water

Instructions

To make the tamal dough or masa:

  • Place lard, vegetable shortening or seasoned oil in an electric mixer and beat until very light, about 1 minute. Add salt and 1 teaspoon of cold water and continue beating until it is white and spongy, a couple more minutes. Add the baking powder and then alternate adding the instant corn masa and the chicken broth a little at a time. Continue beating until dough is homogeneous and as fluffy as can get. You know the tamal masa is ready when you can drop 1/2 teaspoon of the masa in a cup of cold water and it floats.

To make the filling:

  • Combine the salsa verde with the cooked shredded chicken.

To assemble the tamales:

  • Soak the dried corn husks in hot water for a couple minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. Lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. Spread about 3 tablespoons of masa into about a 2 to 3-inch square, the layer should be about 1/4-inch thick, leaving a border of at least 1/2-inch on the sides. Place 1 tablespoon of filling in the middle of the masa square.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa starts to swaddle the filling) and fold the folded sides to one side, rolling them in same direction around tamal. Fold up the empty section of the husk, with the tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open.
  • Assemble all the tamales and place them as vertically as you can in a container.

To prepare the tamalera or steamer:

  • Place water in the bottom pan of a steamer (so that water is under the steamer) and bring it to a simmer. Line the steamer with one or two layers of soaked corn husks.

To cook the tamales:

  • When you have all tamales ready, place them, again as vertically as you can, into the prepared steamer with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, and steam covered with a lid for 50 minutes to an hour. You know the tamales are ready when they come easily free from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks, you will see the moisture, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead several days before and stored in refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 20 minutes and about 45 minutes for frozen tamales.
  • Note: To make seasoned oil, in a medium saucepan, heat 1 cup vegetable oil over medium heat, add a thick slice of onion and 4 garlic cloves. Cook for 15 minutes until completely browned. Remove onion and garlic before using the oil.

Notes

Tamales de Pollo con Salsa Verde

Rabo de Mestiza: Poached Eggs in a Tomato and Poblano Rajas Sauce

rabo de mestiza
Print Recipe
4.5 from 4 votes

Rabo de Mestiza: Poached Eggs in a Tomato and Poblano Rajas Sauce

Rabo de Mestiza: Poached Eggs in a Tomato and Poblano Rajas Sauce recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 1, Episode 8 “Mexican Brunch”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time35 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Brunch, corn tortillas, Eggs, onion, pati's mexican table, piloncillo, poblanos, queso fresco, Tomatoes
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs roma tomatoes
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 3 tbsp corn or safflower oil
  • 1/2 cup white onion slivered or thinly sliced
  • 3/4 lb poblano chiles or about 3, charred, sweated, skinned, stemmed, seeded, cut into about 2″ slices (may soak in hot water with 2 tbsp brown sugar or piloncillo to tame heat)
  • 1/4 tsp dried marjoram
  • 1 tsp kosher or sea salt more or less to taste
  • 8 eggs
  • 1 cup queso fresco crumbled, my substitute for farmers or a mild feta
  • Corn tortillas or toast optional

Instructions

  • Place the tomatoes along with the garlic and bay leaves in a medium saucepan. Cover with water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat, simmer until thoroughly cooked, about 10 minutes. Remove bay leaves and place tomatoes and garlic in the blender and puree until smooth.
  • In a large, heavy bottomed pan set over medium heat, pour in the oil. Once hot, cook the onion, stirring now and then, until soft and translucent, about 4 to 5 minutes. Stir in the poblano rajas and let them cook for 1 or 2 minutes. Pour in the tomato sauce, sprinkle the marjoram, salt and pepper, and let it season and thicken for about 10 to 12 minutes. You can make this sauce ahead of time and refrigerate for up to 4 days.
  • When ready to make the eggs, reheat the sauce, then lower the heat to medium-low and add the eggs one by one. It is easier if you crack the eggs into a small bowl or cup and slide them into the sauce. Sprinkle a bit of salt on top of each egg and cover the pan with its lid. Let the eggs poach until cooked. I like the yolks, still runny, which takes like 4 to 5 minutes.
  • Serve on plates and sprinkle crumbled cheese on top. Have warm corn tortillas or toast on the side.
  • Note: The sauce can be made ahead of time and the dish cooked right before you want to eat it.

Notes

Huevos Rabo de Mestiza: con Salsa de Jitomate y Rajas de Poblano

Fluffy Plantain and Pecan Bread

fluffy plantain bread
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Fluffy Plantain and Pecan Bread

Fluffy Plantain and Pecan Bread recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 13 “Naturally Vegetarian Mexican”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time55 mins
Total Time1 hr 5 mins
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: banana bread, pati's mexican table, pecans, Plantains, vanilla
Servings: 1 10-inch loaf
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 sticks or 6 oz unsalted butter plus more for the pan
  • 2/3 cup granulated sugar
  • 4 large eggs at room temperature
  • 1 pound ripe plantains peeled, sliced, and roughly mashed (about 1 1/2 cups mashed)
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 cup roughly chopped pecans

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
  • Butter sides and bottom of the loaf pan and lightly dust it with flour; set it aside.
  • In the bowl of an electric mixer, beat the butter on medium-high speed for about 3 to 4 minutes, or until soft. Stir in the sugar and keep beating until fluffy. Beat in the eggs until well mixed.
  • In a large bowl, sift together the flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt. Lower the speed on the mixer. Alternate between adding the plantains and the sifted dry ingredient mixture.
  • Add the vanilla and pecans and mix until thoroughly combined.
  • Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan and gently place a piece of aluminum foil on top. Place the pan in the oven and cook for 40 minutes. Remove the foil and cook for an additional 15 to 18 minutes, or until the top of the bread looks golden brown and puffed-out. If you inset a toothpick, it should come out moist but not wet.

Notes

Pan de plátano macho y nuez

Green Chilaquiles in Roasted Tomatillo Sauce

chilaquiles verdes
Print Recipe
4 from 6 votes

Green Chilaquiles in Roasted Tomatillo Sauce

Green Chilaquiles in Roasted Tomatillo Sauce recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 7 “Family-Style Breakfast"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time40 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cotija cheese, feta, garlic, jalapeno, mexican crema, onion, queso fresco, serrano chiles, tomatillos, tortilla chips
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 18 5″ corn tortillas
  • 2 pounds green tomatillos husked and rinsed
  • 1/2 of a large white onion
  • 1 or 2 serrano or jalapeño chiles
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 2 or 3 cilantro sprigs
  • 2 cups vegetable or chicken broth
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil plus more for brushing tortillas

To garnish:

  • 1/2 cup onion thinly sliced
  • 1/4 cup cilantro chopped
  • 1/2 cup queso fresco or cotija or substitute with Farmer’s cheese or mild feta, crumbled
  • 1/4 cup Mexican cream

Instructions

To prepare the tortillas:

  • Heat the oven to 300 degrees. Cut the tortillas into 2-inch, bite-sized pieces, lightly brush with oil, sprinkle salt. Set them on a baking tray and bake in the oven until crispy, about 15 to 20 minutes. Let the pieces cool. Alternately, you can fry the tortilla pieces.

To prepare the tomatillo sauce:

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place the tomatillos, onions, garlic and serrano chiles in a bowl. Add about 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil and rub all the ingredients until everything has a light coat of oil. Lay the ingredients in a baking tray. Sprinkle with salt.
  • Bake until tomatillos are soft and plump and all the ingredients look charred. Let the ingredients cool. Add the charred vegetables, the cilantro and the broth to a blender and mix well.
  • Heat a pan over medium heat, adding one additional tablespoon of oil. When the oil is hot, add the sauce from the blender and finish cooking over medium heat for about 10 minutes. Season to taste.

To serve:

  • When the sauce is hot, quickly but carefully add the tortillas. Stir the tortillas into the mixture so that they are fully coated with the sauce.
  • Serve the tortillas and salsa in a large platter, garnished with the sliced onions, crumbled Mexican queso fresco, drizzle with the cream, garnish with chopped onion and cilantro. Eat immediately.

Notes

Chilaquiles verdes

Mexican French Toast Rolls

Mexican French toast rolls
Print Recipe
4.5 from 4 votes

Mexican French Toast Rolls

Mexican French Toast Rolls recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 7 “Family-Style Breakfast”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Cajeta, cinnamon, Dulce de Leche, french toast, nutella, pati's mexican table
Servings: 8 French toast rolls
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 8 slices white or wheat sandwich bread
  • Cajeta dulce de leche, nutella, almond or peanut butter, or any preserves
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 cup milk
  • 1/8 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Pinch kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon unsalted butter

Instructions

  • Trim the crust from the bread. Flatten the slices slightly with a rolling pin. In the center of each bread slice, add about 1 teaspoon of the filling of your choice and spread.
  • Roll the bread like a cigar or a rolled taco; set aside until you finish all of the slices.
  • In a bowl mix the egg, the cup of milk, vanilla, and salt, and whisk until well combined. In another bowl, mix the sugar with the cinnamon.
  • Set a skillet over medium heat. Once hot, add a tablespoon of butter.
  • Soak the bread rolls in the milk mixture until fully coated. Add them to the hot pan, which should have the butter already melted. Cook the rolls until they’re golden brown and look fully cooked, flipping a few times as they cook to brown on all sides. Roll the fingers in the sugar and cinnamon mixture; they are ready to eat!

Notes

Dedos gitanos

Cajeta Crepes with Toasted Pecans

cajeta crepes
Print Recipe
5 from 2 votes

Cajeta Crepes with Toasted Pecans

Cajeta Crepes with Toasted Pecans recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 3 “A French Twist on Mexico”
Prep Time1 hr 45 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time1 hr 50 mins
Course: Breakfast, Dessert
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Cajeta, Crepes, Dulce de Leche, ice cream, pati's mexican table, pecans, rum
Servings: 10 12 9-inch crêpes
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/3 cup unsalted butter melted
  • Pinch Kosher or sea salt or to taste
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • Extra butter to oil the pan
  • 2 cups Cajeta or dulce de leche
  • 1 1/2 cups milk
  • 1 tablespoon rum optional
  • 1/2 cup pecans chopped and toasted, to garnish
  • Vanilla ice cream optional

Instructions

To make the Crepes:

  • In a small pan, heat the butter over low heat until it melts. Set it aside. Place flour, eggs, milk, sugar, salt and melted butter in the blender and purée until smooth, for about 10 seconds. Add water and blend again until smooth. You can also mix the ingredients by hand, following the same order.
  • Place batter in a container, cover and refrigerate for at least half an hour, up to 12 hours. Once ready to make the crêpes, whisk the batter well with a fork or a whisk.
  • Set a crêpe pan or nonstick skillet over medium-high heat for a couple of minutes. Butter the bottom of the pan and ladle about ¼ cup of batter onto it. Instead of working from the center to the sides, tilt the pan and pour the batter over one side and spread it as quickly as possible to the rest of the pan, so that it covers the entire surface.
  • Cook for about 20 to 25 seconds, until edges are cooked and begin to dry out and the bottom of the crêpe is lightly browned. With a small spatula or fork, lift one edge of the crêpe and turn it over quickly with your fingers. Cook the second side for about 10 to 15 seconds, or until it has lightly browned. Flip the crêpe onto a plate.
  • Repeat with the rest of the batter. After 3 or 4 crêpes, you may need to butter the pan again. If it isn’t a nonstick pan, you may need to do it for every one. Stack crêpes on top of each other with the first, darker side down. That darker side will become the outer layer of the crêpe once you fill them up or fold them.
  • If you aren’t going to use all of the crêpes at once, or if you are making them ahead of time, wrap them in plastic wrap and place them in a closed plastic bag and store in the refrigerator up to 4 days, or in the freezer for weeks.

To make the Sauce:

  • Pour the cajeta and the milk in a saucepan. Heat over medium heat, stirring and gently simmering it for a couple of minutes until it is completely mixed together and well dissolved.

To Assemble:

  • Place a crêpe on a plate and spread a couple tablespoons cajeta sauce all over the surface. Fold crêpe in half, add a couple more tablespoons of sauce into the middle of the half-moon shape. Fold the crêpe again to make a triangle shape (with a rounded bottom) and pour a few more tablespoons of sauce on top.
  • Garnish with the toasted pecans and serve. You may want to add a scoop of vanilla ice cream too…

Notes

Crepas de cajeta con nuez

Blissful Corn Torte

blissful corn torte
Print Recipe
4.17 from 6 votes

Blissful Corn Torte

Blissful Corn Torte recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 2, Episode 3 “A French Twist on Mexico”
Prep Time15 mins
Cook Time45 mins
Total Time1 hr
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Corn, corn bread, cornbread, pati's mexican table, rice flour, Torta
Servings: 12 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1/2 pound unsalted butter
  • 3/4 cup sugar
  • 8 eggs separated
  • 4 cups corn kernels
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 3/4 cup rice flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or coarse salt

Instructions

  • Place rack in the middle of oven and heat to 360 degrees. Butter a 9×12-inch pan.
  • Beat the butter with the sugar until creamy. Slowly add 8 egg yolks, one by one, until incorporated. Add the cream, rice flour and baking powder.
  • In a blender, process the milk with the corn kernels, then, incorporate it into the mix above. Place the mixture in a big mixing bowl.
  • Separately, beat the egg whites with salt until stiff peaks are formed. Add 1/5 of the egg whites to the butter/corn mix and blend carefully. Slowly blend the rest of the egg whites until everything is mixed, it is ok if the mixture looks streaky, don’t over work it or it will lose volume. Pour onto baking dish.
  • Bake until torte is springy to the touch and lightly browned, 45 to 50 minutes. Once it cools a little, cut into squares. It can be served either warm or cold; it can be covered and kept at room temperature for an entire day, or covered and stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Notes

Torta de elote

Baked Fruit Mixiote

baked fruit mixiote
Print Recipe
5 from 2 votes

Baked Fruit Mixiote

Baked Fruit Mixiote recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 12 “Baked!”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Side Dish
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: baked fruit, banana leaves, blackberry, blueberries, fruit, mint, orange juice, pati's mexican table, peaches, vanilla, Vegetarian
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 cups freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • 1 tablespoon agave or maple syrup or honey
  • 2 large peaches pitted and cut into 6 wedges each
  • 1 cup blueberries
  • 1 cup blackberries
  • Banana leaves thawed from frozen
  • 12 fresh mint leaves
  • kosher or coarse sea salt
  • Kitchen twine

Instructions

  • In a small saucepan set over medium heat, bring the orange juice, vanilla and agave syrup to a simmer. Leave it at a steady simmer for 15 minutes or until it has reduced by half (to about 3/4 cup). Remove from the heat.
  • In a bowl, place all the fruit. Pour in the orange juice syrup and gently toss.
  • Pass the banana leaves over the open flame, steadily, without toasting them. Pass them slowly, just until you see them shine and they become fragrant. It’s steady and slow and should only take a few seconds.
  • Preheat the oven to 375 degrees.
  • Place one banana leaf in the bottom of a large baking dish.
  • Cut 12 pieces of about 14-inches in length. They should be between 8 and 10-inches wide. Arrange two cut pieces on top of each other, crossing one another. Place about 1/6 of the fruit mixture right in the middle, place a couple mint leaves on top and add a pinch of salt. Close as in a bundle, making a package and tying a piece of twine around it to close the package. Repeat with each bundle and place them in the baking dish.
  • Bake in the oven for about 20 to 25 minutes. Remove from the oven. Serve the bundles by themselves, or alongside ice cream, pound cake or cinnamon rolls.

Notes

Mixiote de Frutas 

Cajeta & Pecan Cinnamon Rolls

Print Recipe
4.86 from 7 votes

Cajeta & Pecan Cinnamon Rolls

Cajeta & Pecan Cinnamon Rolls recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 12 “Baked!”
Prep Time1 hr 45 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time2 hrs 15 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: bread, Cajeta, canela, cinnamon, dough, pati's mexican table, pecans, Sweetened Condensed Milk, vanilla
Servings: 12 generous sized rolls
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the starter:

  • 1/2 cup lukewarm water
  • 3/4 cup lukewarm milk
  • 1/4 packet (2 1/4 teaspoons) active dry yeast
  • 1 tablespoon sugar

For the dough:

  • 2 eggs lightly beaten
  • 4 cups all-purpose flour plus more to knead the dough
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • Pinch of kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter melted, plus more to butter the bowl

For the filling:

  • 1/4 cup unsalted butter cut into 1/4 -inch dice
  • 3/4 cup Cajeta or dulce de leche
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon or canela
  • 3/4 cup roughly chopped pecans

For the glaze:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter melted
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/3 cup sweetened condensed milk
  • 1/3 cup confectioners' sugar

Instructions

To make the starter:

  • Place the lukewarm milk and water in a small bowl. Be careful as it shouldn’t be hot or cold, or the yeast will not react. Sprinkle the yeast over the liquid along with a tablespoon of sugar. Stir and let rest until it puffs up and becomes foamy, about 10 minutes.

To make the batter:

  • Place the flour in a large mixing bowl. Make a hole in the middle and pour in the beaten eggs, foamy yeast starter, sugar, and salt. Start combining the ingredients with a rubber spatula or wooden spoon. After a few strokes, add the melted butter. Mix with energy, until fully combined. The dough will be very sticky and gooey.
  • Sprinkle your counter or work surface very generously with all-purpose flour. Turn the sticky dough onto the surface, and knead until it transforms from being sticky and gooey to soft and elastic, about 3 to 4 minutes. Add a bit more flour to the counter, if needed, and use a bench scraper to gather the sticky dough from the counter as you knead the dough, and it becomes malleable and soft. Shape the dough into a ball.
  • Butter a large bowl, place the ball of dough in it, cover it with a clean kitchen towel, and let it rest in a warm area of your kitchen with no drafts or air currents, for about 1 to 1 1/4 hours, or until it doubles in size.

To make the rolls:

  • Butter a 9x13-inch baking pan.
  • Sprinkle your counter or working surface generously with all-purpose flour. Place the dough on the floured counter and knead gently to begin to form a rectangle. Sprinkle a rolling pin with flour and use it to roll the dough into a long rectangle of about 10-inches wide by 24-inches long.
  • Leaving a 1-inch frame around the rectangle spread the dulce de leche across the length of the dough to form a centered and long 6-inch stripe. Sprinkle the chopped pecans, the cinnamon, and the butter chunks all over the surface, except for that 1-inch frame.
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees.
  • Working lengthwise, roll up the rectangle tightly. Brush the top 1 inch edge of the rectangle, with water, and close the roll up. Cut into 12 rolls: I like to cut the log in half first, then that half in half, and each of those quarters into 3 rolls. Place them in the buttered baking dish. Cover the baking dish with a kitchen towel, and let them rest in a warm area of your kitchen with no drafts or air currents, until they double in size, about an hour.
  • Bake the cinnamon rolls for 27 to 30 minutes, until they are fully cooked and golden brown on top. Remove from the oven.

To make glaze:

  • In a medium bowl, combine the melted butter with the vanilla, lime juice, and sweetened condensed milk and mix with a whisk or spatula. Incorporate the confectioners sugar and mix until fully combined. Pour freely all over the rolls.
  • If you add the glaze while the rolls are still hot, they will turn out even better. Eat as soon as glaze has set, or at least try; it will be just a few minutes.

Notes

Roles de Canela y Cajeta

Baked Egg Casserole

baked egg casserole pati jinich
Print Recipe
4.58 from 7 votes

Baked Egg Casserole

Baked Egg Casserole recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 12 “Baked!”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time15 mins
Total Time20 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cheese, Eggs, ham, Monterrey Jack cheese, mozzarella, Oaxaca cheese, pati's mexican table, refried beans, Salsa, Tomatoes, turkey
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • Vegetable oil for frying eggs
  • 8 eggs
  • To taste kosher or coarse sea salt
  • 3 cups refried beans
  • 8 slices of turkey or ham
  • 1 batch salsa ranchera
  • 2 cups (about 8 ounces) grated cheese such as Oaxaca, mozzarella or Monterrey Jack

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • In a medium skillet set over medium-low heat, heat a teaspoon of vegetable oil. Once hot, crack in 4 eggs, sprinkle with salt, and cover with a lid. Cook for about 3 minutes, until eggs are set, but not fully done, and the yolk is gooey. Repeat with the remaining 4 eggs, or make two skillets at once.
  • In an individual casserole, ovenproof bowl or large ramekin, spoon 3/4 cup refried beans, add a slice of turkey or ham, and a pair of the cooked eggs. Ladle in a generous amount of salsa ranchera to completely cover, and add shredded cheese on top. Assemble the rest of the casseroles. Alternatively, it can be made in a large casserole for everyone to share.
  • Place in the oven until the cheese has completely melted, about 4 to 5 minutes.

Notes

Cazuela de Huevos Rancheros

Champurrado

Print Recipe
4 from 7 votes

Champurrado

Champurrado recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 5 “Tamaliza!”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time15 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: atole, Chocolate, cinnamon, masa, mexican chocolate, pati's mexican table, piloncillo
Servings: 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 cup corn masa flour
  • 4 cups warm water
  • 4 cups milk
  • 8 ounces Mexican chocolate for drinking such as Abuelita, grated or cut into chunks (about 1 cup)
  • 2 ounces grated piloncillo or brown sugar (about 1/4 cup)
  • 1 cinnamon stick about 3-inches long

Instructions

  • Stir the corn masa flour into the warm water. Let it sit for a couple minutes and strain it onto a saucepan set over medium heat. Incorporate the milk and let it simmer for 3 to 4 minutes, so it will begin to thicken. Incorporate the piloncillo or brown sugar, the chocolate and the cinnamon stick. Simmer for about 5 minutes, stirring here and there, until the chocolate and the piloncillo dissolve. Serve hot.

Notes

Chocolate Atole

Juju’s Mango Smoothie

Print Recipe
4.84 from 6 votes

Juju’s Mango Smoothie

Juju’s Mango Smoothie recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 1 "Good Morning, Mexico!"
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time3 mins
Total Time8 mins
Course: Drinks
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: banana, breakfast, mango, orange juice, pati's mexican table, smoothie, vanilla
Servings: 3 cups
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 2 cups diced fresh mango or thawed from frozen
  • 1 teaspoon Mexican vanilla extract
  • 2 cups orange juice preferably fresh squeezed
  • 1 ripe banana sliced

Instructions

  • Combine the mango, vanilla, orange juice, and banana in a blender and puree until smooth. Add a couple handfuls of ice cubes and puree until well blended.

Big Brunch Enchiladas

Print Recipe
4.5 from 6 votes

Black Bean Sauce Egg Enchiladas with Chorizo and Queso Fresco

Black Bean Sauce Egg Enchiladas with Chorizo and Queso Fresco recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 4, Episode 1 “Good Morning, Mexico!”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, black beans, chipotles in adobo, Chorizo, corn tortillas, cotija, Eggs, Enchilada, goat cheese, pati's mexican table, Pickled Jalapeños, queso fresco
Servings: 12 enchiladas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked black beans and their cooking broth or 2 cans black beans, drained, plus 1 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons adobo sauce from chipotles in adobo sauce
  • 1 chipotle chile in adobo sauce seeded, optional
  • 2 tablespoons vinegary sauce from pickled jalapeños or escabeche
  • 1 pound Mexican chorizo casings removed, roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1/3 cup chopped scallions plus extra for garnish
  • 8 large eggs beaten with a fork or whisk until foamy
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 12 corn tortillas
  • 1 cup crumbled queso fresco cotija, farmer’s cheese, or goat cheese
  • 4 to 6 Pickled jalapeños seeded and chopped, optional as garnish
  • Ripe avocado slices optional

Instructions

  • Place the cooked black beans and their cooking broth, or water if using canned beans, in a blender along with the sauce from the chipotles in adobo and the vinegary sauce from the pickled jalapeños, puree until smooth. Place the puree in a medium saucepan and heat over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until very hot. Reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting and keep warm. The puree should have the consistency of heavy cream.
  • Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Once it is hot, add the chorizo and cook, crumbling as it cooks with a wooden spoon or spatula, until it has browned and crisped, about 5 to 6 minutes. Scrape into a bowl, cover and set aside.
  • Pre-heat a comal or cast iron skillet over medium heat.
  • Meanwhile, heat the oil in a medium, or 10-inch, nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking. Add the scallions and cook until soft and translucent and the edges begin to brown lightly, about 3 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low, pour in the beaten eggs, sprinkle with the salt, and cook, stirring often and gently, until desired doneness. I like to stop cooking the eggs when they are still soft and tender, not dry, which takes about 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  • Heat the corn tortillas, a pair at a time, on the pre-heated comal or skillet about 30 seconds to 1 minute per side. You want them to be completely heated and even slightly toasted. (Alternatively, the tortillas can be quickly “passed through hot oil,” that is quickly fried, 10 seconds per side, in pre-heated oil in a medium skillet over medium heat.) One by one, place the heated tortillas on a plate and spoon about 3 tablespoons of the scrambled eggs onto each tortilla. Roll and place on a platter seam side down. Continue with the remaining tortillas.
  • When all the tortillas are stuffed, rolled, and set on the platter, pour the bean puree on top. Cover with the cooked chorizo, crumbled queso and extra scallions. Add as much chopped pickled jalapeño as you like, as well as avocado slices.

Notes

Enchiladas de Huevo con Salsa de Frijol con Chipotle, Chorizo y Queso Fresco

Big Brunch Enchiladas

An intrinsically Mexican dish, enchiladas are not one but a multitude of possibilities that can dress up a corn tortilla. Simply the sound of the word enchilada makes any Mexican’s mouth water in less than a millisecond and is cause for celebration.

One of the dearest antojos or antojitos (translate to whims or little whims), enchiladas are corn tortillas that may be heated up or lightly fried, either folded or rolled, with or without a variety of fillings, always bathed in a salsa or sauce, and garnished with a a few from a long list of possible toppings. From crumbled queso fresco and a drizzle of crema, to raw or pickled onion, chiles or other vegetables, Mexican avocado, chorizo, shredded lettuces and cabbage, just to name some.

Considering the variations of fillings, salsas, and toppings, enchiladas not only embody different regional cuisine’s identities, but also the whims of different cooks…

Here is my latest one; I call it the Big Brunch Enchilada.


Before filling the corn tortillas with soft scrambled eggs, seasoned with sautéed scallions, I opted to quickly fry the tortillas. As we Mexicans say, pasamos las tortillas por aceite caliente: we dip the tortillas in very hot oil for a couple seconds to make them malleable and even more resilient to withhold the sauce and garnishes. If the oil is very hot, the tortilla will not absorb the oil, but will be transformed. You can opt to not fry and instead heat the tortillas on a hot comal, skillet, or griddle, for a minute per side until thoroughly hot and barely crisp.

However, please: for the love of anyone or anything you love the most, don’t use flour tortillas to make enchiladas.

Just, please, don’t? I am begging here.

Flour tortillas are sweeter than corn tortillas, they are less resilient to withhold sauce, fillings, and garnishes and become a mushy mess of the worst sorts if given the enchilada treatment.

Please, please, please, proudly stick to corn tortillas.

big brunch enchiladas
As for the salsa or sauce, the most well known enchiladas are verdes soaked in a salsa verde, enchiladas rojas soaked in a red salsa, and enchiladas de mole. All, of course, with their multiple variations.

For my Big Brunch ones, I am bathing them with a rich, thick and earthy black bean sauce, common in the Mexican Gulf Coast. I tend to have trouble deciding whether to eat my black beans with chipotles in adobo sauce or pickled jalapeños. Truth is, if I use one, I usually end up adding the other one too and mixing them up. So here, I am adding and combining both. The homemade black beans, or store bought ones if you don’t have time to cook them, are seasoned with the smoky, sweet and spicy adobo sauce from chipotles in adobo, as well as the vinegary pickling sauce from the pickled jalapeños. I couldn’t be happier with the result.

Forget about a light garnish, add tons of meaty and crisp bites of Mexican chorizo.

big brunch enchiladas
Fresh, tart and slightly salty crumbled queso fresco.

big brunch enchiladas

Bright fresh scallions (I love scallions…) that contrast with the cooked scallions scrambled with the eggs.

big brunch enchiladas
To finish off, punchy chopped pickled jalapeños go on top.

big brunch enchiladas
I liked these enchiladas so much, I couldn’t even decide on an ending photo for the blog post. So I am showing you the view from the top and from the side.

big brunch enchiladas
These enchiladas ended up being not an antojito but an antojote, a huge antojo of mine. Made to be eaten for a big brunch, they passed the critical approval of all my boys to the point that they were fighting for each piece on this plate. This is the one time when I don’t complain about them fighting.

Since this is a sign of success in my kitchen, the recipe is now yours!

I hope you give it a try for your Cinco de Mayo fiesta, your Mother or Father’s day brunch, or anytime you may want to indulge. As complex as they may sound, they are super easy and fast to make. Here’s how.

big brunch enchiladas
Print Recipe
4.6 from 5 votes

Enchiladas with Chipotle Black Bean Sauce, Chorizo and Queso Fresco

An intrinsically Mexican dish, enchiladas are not one but a multitude of possibilities that can dress up a corn tortilla. Simply the sound of the word enchilada makes any Mexican’s mouth water in less than a millisecond and is cause for celebration. One of the dearest antojos or antojitos (translate to whims or little whims), enchiladas are corn tortillas that may be heated up or lightly fried, either folded or rolled, with or without a variety of fillings, always bathed in a salsa or sauce, and garnished with a a few from a long list of possible toppings. 
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Course: Antojos, Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, black beans, chipotles in adobo, Chorizo, corn tortillas, Eggs, Enchilada, pati's mexican table, Pickled Jalapeños, queso fresco
Servings: 12 enchiladas
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 cups cooked beans and 1cup of their cooking broth or 2 drained cans black beans plus 1 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons adobo sauce from chipotle chiles in adobo sauce
  • 2 tablespoons vinegary sauce from pickled jalapeños in vinegar or escabeche
  • 1 pound Mexican chorizo casings removed, roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil plus more oil if frying the tortillas
  • 1/3 cup chopped scallions plus extra for garnish
  • 9 large eggs beaten with a fork or whisk until foamy
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 12 corn tortillas
  • 1 cup crumbled queso fresco cotija, farmer’s cheese, or goat cheese
  • 6 to 8 pickled jalapeños seeded and chopped, for garnish
  • Ripe Mexican avocado slices optional

Instructions

  • Place the cooked black beans and cooking broth (or water if using canned) in a blender, along with the sauce from the chipotles in adobo and the vinegary sauce from the pickled jalapeños, and puree until smooth. Place in a medium saucepan, heat over medium-low heat, stirring occasionally, until very hot. Reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting and keep warm. The puree should have the consistency of heavy cream.
  • Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Once it is hot, add the chopped chorizo and cook, crumbling as it cooks with a wooden spoon or spatula into small bite sized pieces, until it has browned and crisped, about 5 to 6 minutes. Scrape into a bowl, cover and set aside.
  • Pre-heat a comal or cast iron skillet over medium heat.
  • Heat the oil in a medium 10-inch nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot but not smoking. Add the scallions and cook until soft and translucent and the edges begin to brown lightly, about 4 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium-low, pour in the beaten eggs, sprinkle with the salt, and cook, stirring often and gently, until desired doneness. I like to stop the cooking when the eggs are still soft and tender, not dry, which takes about 4 to 5 minutes. Remove from the heat.
  • Heat the corn tortillas, a pair at a time, in the pre-heated comal or skillet, about 1 minute per side, until completely heated through and even slightly toasted. Alternatively, you can heat enough oil to have 1/2" in a medium skillet set over medium heat, once very hot but not smoking, quickly pass each tortilla through the oil (4 to 5 seconds) and place on a plate or drying rack covered with paper towels. You know the oil is ready if when you dip a tortilla, the oil bubbles actively all around the edges and the tortillas begin to puff up after a few seconds.
  • One by one, place on a plate and spoon about 2 generous tablespoons of the scrambled eggs onto the center of tortilla. Roll it into a soft taco and place in a platter, seam side down.
  • When all the tortillas are stuffed and rolled on the platter, pour the bean puree on top. Cover with the cooked chorizo, crumbled queso and extra scallions. Add as many chopped pickled jalapeños as you like. Decorate with ripe avocado slices if you want to take those enchiladas way over the top.

Notes

Enchiladas de Huevo con Salsa de Frijol con Chipotle, Chorizo y Queso Fresco

Yucatán Style French Toast: Ultra Decadent

It’s ironic. The farthest away from Mexico I’ve been, the closest I’ve felt to my home country and the more I’ve gotten to know it.

Namely, there are 2,419 miles between my home in the DC area and the home I was born and raised in, in Mexico City (I’ve seen it in Google maps a thousand times with my boys), it’s a 44-hour drive if you go non-stop and a 5-hour flight with no connections.

Distance matters. It weighs, in tons of pounds of nostalgia that can be soothed in the kitchen. Distance has made my time in Mexico intense and adventurous, and the foods I am able to replicate in my American kitchen that much more precious.

It has been 15 years since we packed our bags to move from Mexico City to Texas. Since then, I’ve taken every opportunity to go back to visit. There is always something new to learn and something to rediscover. And there is always a dish that sticks with me in such a way that it has me running back home to make it for my boys. If they request it, time and again, it becomes a home staple that I hope to pass on.

That’s the case with the ultra decadent Yucatán style French toast, also known as caballeros pobres. I even included it on an episode called Brunch at the Jinich Home, from Season 3 of my TV series. It is very similar to a dish called Capirotada, in fact, some consider it Yucatan’s version of it.

Pati's Mexican Table shoot
Here’s Dan, our amazing director, showing me how the food looked on camera on the set at home.

We love eating it on Sundays for a late and lazy brunch.  It marks the weekend for us, when we can linger at the table. When I don’t mind making things that may have a few more steps, or may be messier to prepare, all of which the boys love to take on.

Dany and I tasted it for the first time in Yucatán 5 years ago. As we sat down at Los Almendros, a classic restaurant in Mérida, I did what I always do – which drives Dany crazy – and asked the waiter 3 questions:

1. What’s your favorite thing to eat from the menu? I can hear Dany saying “what do you care what he likes to eat Pati, what if he has a completely different taste preference than you, or what if he is pushing things out of the kitchen that aren’t selling?”

2. What is the most traditional food on the menu? I can hear Dany saying “some dishes may be included to show the restaurant’s authenticity regardless of how good they may be…”

3. What is, by far, the best seller here? I can practically see Dany rolling his eyes…

For #1, waiter said “caballeros pobres!” The poetic and contrasting name of the dish hooked me: translates to “poor gentlemen”. For #2, he said “caballeros pobres, it has been on the menu since the restaurant opened in 1962, it’s a dessert that’s existed since anyone in Merida can remember.” By that point I was ready to run to the kitchen to get one. For #3, he said “everybody orders caballeros pobres.” Ok. Done deal.

I am a fan of the French toast food category. The Yucatán style, however, is in a  league of it’s own.

french bread slices

It uses what is known in Mexico as pan francés or French bread, which is like a baguette but a bit thicker. Some versions use bolillos or teleras (just smaller in size). You are safe to use any crusty bread of your choice.

Then the thick slices are entirely soaked, drenched, in a mix of milk, vanilla and sweetened condensed milk. You heard that right: sweetened condensed milk.

pouring sweetened condensed milk

You know you want it.

I made it for a class on Yucatecan food at the Mexican Cultural Institute.  The 120 attendees were all oohs and ahs when I demoed the dipping of the bread in the sweetened condensed milk mix. Practically every one, wanted seconds, which I didn’t plan for.

coating bread slices

There’s more. Instead of dunking the bread in beaten whole eggs, the eggs are separated. The egg whites are beaten until stiff peaks are formed, as in a meringue, then the yolks are gently added to form a thick coating: a capeado.

dipping bread into egg mix

Hence, there may lay the gentlemen status of an everyday bread that is first soaked in a sweetened condensed milk bath, to be then fully dressed in a fluffy cape.

coating bread in egg mixture

Once luxuriously dressed, it is crisped and browned to golden status.

frying the french toast

That is not all: though at home we can happily eat it like that with a bit of honey, maple syrup or confectioner’s sugar.

fried french toast without syrup

The caballeros pobres are then sauced with a simple syrup flavored with true cinnamon, a few whole cloves and raisins.

syrup

You can make the syrup ahead of time and reheat it. You can also make it while you are dressing and browning the bread.

Wait: I am still missing the last garnish: chopped, crunchy, nutty almonds.

finished french toast with syrup and garnishes

Ok, wait, again: Some people add sherry to the syrup. That takes it to adult territory, which would pair well for a grown up brunch.

Of all the versions of Yucatán style french toast this recipe below is my favorite. Crispy, chewy, moist. I prefer to eat it hot and with the warm syrup on top as a main dish for a weekend breakfast or brunch. However, in Yucatán it is traditionally served very cold and for dessert. Then again, I have to admit that I always make extra to have leftovers in the refrigerator, so I can sneak into the kitchen at just about anytime, to eat them cold.

yucatan style french toast
Print Recipe
5 from 1 vote

Yucatán-Style French Toast

Of all the versions of Yucatán style french toast this recipe below is my favorite. Crispy, chewy, moist. I prefer to eat it hot and with the warm syrup on top as a main dish for a weekend breakfast or brunch. However, in Yucatán it is traditionally served very cold and for dessert. Then again, I have to admit that I always make extra to have leftovers in the refrigerator, so I can sneak into the kitchen at just about anytime, to eat them cold.
Prep Time35 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almonds, bread, ceylon, cinnamon, raisins, Sherry, Sweetened Condensed Milk, vanilla
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the syrup:

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup raisins or to taste
  • 1 ceylon or true cinnamon stick
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 2 tablespoons Dry Sherry optional

For the toast:

  • 6 eggs separated
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 large French baguette or thick baguette of your choice cut into 3/4-inch slices
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds

Instructions

  • Place a medium saucepan with the water, sugar, raisins, cinnamon and cloves over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and let it cook until it achieves the consistency of a light syrup and the flavors from the spices have infused the liquid, about 35 minutes. Turn off the heat. If you like a hint of alcohol in your dessert, add the sherry. Remove the cinnamon stick and cloves. Cover to keep warm.
  • Meanwhile, beat the egg whites in the bowl of an electric mixer or with a hand mixer over medium-high speed until they hold stiff peaks. Reduce the speed to low, add the yolks one by one and continue beating just until incorporated, so the volume will not decrease much.
  • In a large bowl, combine the milk, sweetened condensed milk and vanilla, stir until incorporated.
  • Set the bowl with the milk mixture beside the bowl with the beaten egg whites and yolks.
  • Fill a large sauté pan with about 1/4-inch of oil and heat over medium heat until hot, but not smoking, and you see ripples in the oil when you tilt the pan.
  • One at a time, dunk each piece of bread in the milk mixture until soaked, immediately dip into the egg mixture to completely cover, and place the coated slice in the hot oil. Fry for about a minute on one side, until golden brown, flip to the other side and do the same. Add as many bread pieces as will fit into the pan without over-crowding. When finished frying, place the bread pieces on a baking dish covered with paper towels to drain.
  • Traditionally, the “poor gentleman” pieces are placed on a platter, covered with the syrup and refrigerated. But I think they are a thousand times tastier served hot! Cover the pieces with warm syrup, sprinkle chopped almonds on top and serve.
  • If you have leftovers, cover the battered and fried bread pieces with the remaining syrup and almonds, and store covered in the refrigerator. I admit they are also fabulous cold.

Notes

Caballeros Pobres

Yucatán-Style French Toast

Yucatan style french toast
Print Recipe
4.8 from 5 votes

Yucatán-Style French Toast

Yucatán-Style French Toast recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 10 “Brunch at the Jinich House”
Prep Time35 mins
Cook Time10 mins
Total Time45 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: almonds, bread, ceylon, cinnamon, cloves, pati's mexican table, raisins, Sherry, Sweetened Condensed Milk
Servings: 6 to 8 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup raisins or to taste
  • 1 ceylon or true cinnamon stick
  • 3 whole cloves
  • 2 tablespoons Dry Sherry optional
  • 6 eggs separated
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 14-ounce can sweetened condensed milk
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla extract
  • Vegetable oil for frying
  • 1 large French baguette or thick baguette of your choice cut into 3/4-inch slices
  • 1/2 cup chopped almonds

Instructions

  • Place a medium saucepan with the water, sugar, raisins, cinnamon and cloves over medium heat. Bring to a simmer and let it cook until it achieves the consistency of a light syrup and the flavors from the spices have infused the liquid, about 35 minutes. Turn off the heat. If you like a hint of alcohol in your dessert, add the sherry. Remove the cinnamon stick and cloves. Cover to keep warm.
  • Meanwhile, beat the egg whites in the bowl of an electric mixer or with a hand mixer over medium-high speed until they hold stiff peaks. Reduce the speed to low, add the yolks one by one and continue beating just until incorporated, so the volume will not decrease much.
  • In a large bowl, combine the milk, sweetened condensed milk and vanilla, stir until incorporated.
  • Set the bowl with the milk mixture beside the bowl with the beaten egg whites and yolks.
  • Fill a large sauté pan with about 1/4-inch of oil and heat over medium heat until hot, but not smoking, and you see ripples in the oil when you tilt the pan.
  • One at a time, dunk each piece of bread in the milk mixture until soaked, immediately dip into the egg mixture to completely cover, and place the coated slice in the hot oil. Fry for about a minute on one side, until golden brown, flip to the other side and do the same. Add as many bread pieces as will fit into the pan without over-crowding. When finished frying, place the bread pieces on a baking dish covered with paper towels to drain.
  • Traditionally, the “poor gentleman” pieces are placed on a platter, covered with the syrup and refrigerated. But I think they are a thousand times tastier served hot! Cover the pieces with warm syrup, sprinkle chopped almonds on top and serve.
  • If you have leftovers, cover the battered and fried bread pieces with the remaining syrup and almonds, and store covered in the refrigerator. I admit they are also fabulous cold.

Notes

Caballeros Pobres

Huevos Rancheros with Zucchini

huevos rancheros with zucchini
Print Recipe
4.2 from 5 votes

Huevos Rancheros with Zucchini

Huevos Rancheros with Zucchini recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 10 “Brunch at the Jinich House”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Total Time40 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Eggs, jalapeno, onion, pati's mexican table, Tomatoes, Zucchini
Servings: 4 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 cup chopped white onion
  • 1 jalapeño finely chopped, more or less to taste
  • 1 1/2 pounds ripe Roma tomatoes cored and chopped, don’t discard the seeds (about 5 to 7 tomatoes)
  • 1 large or 2 medium zucchinis chopped (about 2 cups)
  • 8 eggs
  • 1/2 teaspoon vegetable oil to cook the eggs

Instructions

To make the salsa:

  • In a large skillet, heat 3 tablespoons of oil over medium heat until hot, but not smoking, then add the onion and jalapeño, cook, stirring occasionally, until completely soft and translucent, about 6 to 8 minutes. Raise the heat to medium-high, add the tomatoes and cook until they become soft, juicy and mushy, about 15 minutes.
  • Reduce the heat to low, add the zucchini, cover, and cook for about 6 minutes or until zucchini is cooked through but still with a crisp bite, and the tomatoes are completely mushy. Remove the lid and turn off the heat.

To make the eggs:

  • Heat a small, 6-inch non-stick skillet over medium-low heat for at least 5 minutes. Add half a teaspoon oil, once hot, crack two eggs at a time into the pan, sprinkle with salt to taste, cover with a lid, and cook to your preferred doneness. I give them about 5 minutes, as I like the whites fully cooked and the yolks runny. Serve with a generous amount of salsa on top.

Notes

Huevos Rancheros con Calabacitas

Mexican-Style Gravlax with Cilantro and Tequila

mexican style gravlax with cilantro and tequila
Print Recipe
4.8 from 5 votes

Mexican-Style Gravlax with Cilantro and Tequila

Mexican-Style Gravlax with Cilantro and Tequila recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 10 “Brunch at the Jinich House”
Prep Time10 mins
Cook Time2 d
Total Time2 d 10 mins
Course: Antojos, Breakfast
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: brown sugar, Chipotle, cumin, flour tortillas, lime, pati's mexican table, salmon, tequila
Servings: 24 small toasts
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 2 teaspoons chipotle chile powder ancho chile powder, or a Mexican mix
  • 2 tablespoons kosher or coarse sea salt plus more for seasoning
  • 1 tablespoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 1 cup finely chopped cilantro
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • 1 pound fresh salmon skin on, bones removed
  • 2 tablespoons silver tequila
  • 6 5-inch Flour tortillas or whole grain bread, toasted
  • 1 cup Mexican crema
  • 1 ripe avocado halved, pitted, chopped
  • 1 lime halved

Instructions

  • Combine the cumin, chile powder, salt, pepper, sugar, lime zest and cilantro in a small bowl. Place the salmon flat, skin-side up, in a long baking dish. Make 10 to 12 1-inch slashes in the skin with the tip of a knife, just deep enough to reach the flesh. Rub 1/3 of the salt mixture into skin, then flip the fish over, spoon the tequila over the fish and rub the remaining 2/3 of the salt mixture on the salmon.
  • Cover the fish tightly with plastic wrap, then place a slightly smaller baking dish directly on top of fish and weigh it down with heavy unopened cans. Refrigerate for 2-3 days, basting with the resulting juices each night and re-covering and weighing back down again.
  • When ready to serve, remove the gravlax from the refrigerator. Thinly slice the salmon flesh, taking care not to cut through the skin and arrange the pieces on a platter. Serve with lightly toasted flour tortillas or toasted whole grain bread (keep warm in a clean kitchen towel, bread basket or tortillero), and let everyone garnish with the crema, avocado and a squeeze of fresh lime juice.

Notes

Gravlax con Cilantro y Tequila

My Favorite Tamal of All Time: Chicken in Green Salsa

Tamales are it. If you’ve eaten one, you know it.

Simple. When ready and steaming hot, unwrap the edible bundle and eat swiftly, no fork, no knife, bite by bite.  So good.

Yet as simple as it may sound to write a post about tamales, I could dedicate an entire series of cookbooks to their endless possibilities, and in the end, not have covered them all.

Ancestral, iconic, yet humble, is each single tamal. And the tamal universe, immense, imagine: tamal refers to anything wrapped and cooked in a husk or leave. Usually made with masa, typically corn masa, either mixed with or swaddling ingredients, or both! As you move through Mexico, and increasingly outside, you find them in different shapes (round, square, flat, puffed up, even triangular like Michoacán corundas); with different wraps (corn husks, either fresh or dried, banana leaves and even fresh edible leafy greens like chaya in Chiapas); with an infinity of ingredients, from savory, like chicken, meat, seafood, vegetables, beans, all sort of grains, salsas and cheese…to sweet ingredients, like fresh and dried fruits, nuts, chocolate, cajeta

The consistency and texture vary greatly, too, from thin and dense like tamales found in Oaxaca; to sticky and gelatinous from Yucatán; to spongy and cakey like the ones from northern and central Mexico, where I grew up.

Tamales are so big in our kitchens that entire meals are devoted to them: the famous Tamaladas! Festive get-togethers we all get very excited about, where all you eat are different kinds of tamales, from beginning to end. Trust me, where there is a variety of tamales, you want to eat them all.

Aside from Tamaladas, tamales are present in all sorts of celebrations and holidays including Quinceañeras, Posadas, Christmas Eve and New Years parties: they have been fiesta food since pre-Hispanic times, when they were considered gifts from the Gods.

But tamales are also everyday food, for an entire country, an entire culture. Accessible to everyone and anyone who can get to the corner stand and has 10 pesos (less than a dollar) in their pocket for a quick breakfast, a filling lunch or an easy merienda (light dinner).

See photo below…. I was with my school friends eating tamales at the tamal stand on the street right outside our middle school. I used to day dream about those tamales; they were so alluring we used to sneak out of school to eat them…

Pati eating tamales with her school friends

Tamales are as fascinating and varied as the stars above. So to land this philosophical rambling about tamales somewhere practical and edible, for you, I will focus on my favorite tamal of all time. The Tamal de Pollo con Salsa Verde.

The easiest way to make tamales is to prepare your filling(s) first. In fact you can make it a day or two in advance. For the ones I feature here, make your cooked salsa verde, pictured in the molcajete below. Combine it with cooked shredded chicken to make a wet mix. No, you don’t want it dry! The tamal masa will soak up some of that salsa. After the tamales cook for almost an hour, you want to bite into a tamal that has a saucy, moist filling.

salsa verde

Then get your hands on dried corn husks, pictured below. You can get them in the Latin aisles of your supermarket, at many a Latin or international store, or online. No excuse. Soak those husks in warm water, so they will become malleable and pliable. You don’t want them to crack as you use them to wrap the dough and roll the tamal. You will also need to place some of the leaves in the tamalera or steamer.

Get the tamalera ready. Pour water and drop a coin in there. That’s a passed down trick from endless generations. It works as an alarm for when the tamales may be running out of water, so you won’t need to open up the pot and let all that precious steam come out: if the water is running out, the coin will start jumping up and down and make loud clinking noises.

dried corn husks

Then you work to make your masa. Or let the mixer help you out! I have the complete recipe below, but let me just highlight a few things…

In Mexico, you can go into the tortillería and buy fresh masa, made from scratch. And wouldn’t it be heavenly if there were tortillerías in all towns and cities in the US, so we could all indulge? But the truth is many, if not most, people in Mexican kitchens make their own masa at home from the instant corn masa flour, and you can get fabulous results.

Traditionally, tamal masa is made with lard. If top quality and fresh, it adds a delicious taste and texture and doesn’t have as much cholesterol as people think. If you ask me, I think it is a matter of moderation. Yet, many people prefer vegetable shortening and you can use it too. Now, vegetable shortening has, as of late, been questioned even more than lard.

If you don’t want to use either, I have a wonderful solution: use vegetable oil, substitute exact amounts, but to maintain depth of flavor and dimension, season the oil by heating it over medium heat and cooking a slice of onion and a couple garlic cloves in it for 15 minutes. Then remove the onion and garlic before using. Great trick for vegetarians as well. In fact, before the Spanish arrived to Mexico, and there was no pork, oils extracted from fruits, vegetables and seeds, were used to moisten and season tamales, so feel free to play around with oils you like!

The most important thing about the masa, aside from being well seasoned, is that it needs to be as fluffy as fluffy can get. It has to be so airy that, if you take a cup of cold water and drop half a teaspoon of the masa in it, it floats!  You can only achieve this by beating it for a long time at a good speed. That’s why I recommend a mixer in the recipe below, but of course, you are welcome to get a good work out from the masa mixing by hand or with a sturdy spatula.

Then, follow my detailed instructions below on how to fill and wrap the tamales, place them in the tamalera and hold your horses for 50 minutes until they are ready.

Hopefully, you make more than what you need. I can think of few foods that have as much warmth, sustenance and meaning than tamales. They are food that is meant to be shared. So I suggest you try a Tamalada gathering! Tamaladas don’t only happen on February 2nd (when according to tradition you must host a Tamalada and invite EVERYBODY, if you got the baby hidden in the Rosca de Reyes eaten on January 6th), they can happen anytime (but I am writing this post before February 2nd, just in case!).

Make many fillings ahead of time. Make your masa. Invite friends over and have a tamal-making party before the Tamalada. Everyone will have gifts to open and eat, as that is what tamales are, indeed. And the best gift of them all will be any leftover tamales that a lucky guest gets to take along. Or be a bit greedy, keep them at home.

Note: I’ve been asked for a quick casserole version in a few emails… All you need to do, is spread half the masa in the recipe below in a large baking dish, then add a layer of the chicken in salsa verde, top with remaining half masa dough. Cover well with aluminum foil, and bake in a 400 degree oven for 1 hour. Remove from the oven and if you want, drizzle with some Mexican crema and crumbled queso fresco. Serve in squares.

Print Recipe
4.25 from 4 votes

Chicken in Salsa Verde Tamales

Tamales are it. If you’ve eaten one, you know it. Simple. When ready and steaming hot, unwrap the edible bundle and eat swiftly, no fork, no knife, bite by bite.  So good. Yet as simple as it may sound to write a post about tamales, I could dedicate an entire series of cookbooks to their endless possibilities, and in the end, not have covered them all.
Prep Time45 mins
Cook Time50 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: chicken, masa, pati's mexican table, salsa verde, Tamales, tomatillos
Servings: 18 tamales
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

For the tamales:

  • 25 dried corn husks soaking in warm water
  • 3/4 cup lard, vegetable shortening or seasoned vegetable oil (to make seasoned oil, heat oil over medium heat and cook a slice of onion and 3 to 4 garlic cloves for 15 minutes, strain before using)
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or coarse sea salt or to taste
  • 1 teaspoon cold water
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 pound (about 3 1/4 cups) instant corn masa for tortillas or tamales
  • 3 1/2 cups chicken stock add more if needed

For the filling:

  • 1 recipe for cooked salsa verde
  • 2 cups shredded cooked chicken

Instructions

To make the filling:

  • Make the salsa verde, combine it with the shredded chicken, and set aside or refrigerate, if made ahead of time.

To make masa for the tamales:

  • Place lard, vegetable shortening or seasoned oil in a mixer and beat, until very light, about 1 minute. Add salt and 1 teaspoon cold water, and continue beating until it is white and spongy, a couple more minutes. Add baking powder, and then take turns adding the instant corn masa and the chicken stock. Continue beating until dough is homogeneous and as fluffy as can get.
  • You know the tamal masa is ready if, when you drop 1/2 teaspoon of the masa in a cup of cold water, it floats.

To prepare the tamalera or steamer:

  • Place hot water in the bottom pan of a steamer (only enough so the water is just under the basket with the tamales and not touching them) and bring it to a simmer. Line the steamer basket with one or two layers of soaked corn husks. Use dough to form about 18 cornhusk wrapped tamales.

To make the tamales:

  • Soak dried corn husks in hot water for a couple minutes, or until they are pliable, and drain. Lay out a corn husk with the tapering end towards you. Spread about 3 tablespoons of masa into about a 2- to 3-inch square, the layer should be about 1/4-inch thick, leaving a border of at least 1/2-inch on the sides. Place 1 tablespoon of filling in the middle of the masa square.
  • Pick up the two long sides of the corn husk and bring them together (you will see how the masa starts to swaddle the filling) and fold the folded sides to one side, rolling them on same direction around tamal. Fold up the empty section of the husk with the tapering end, from the bottom up. This will form a closed bottom and the top will be left open.
  • Prepare all the tamales and place them as vertically as you can in a container. When you have them all ready, place them again, as vertically as you can on the prepared steamer, with the open end on top. If there is space left in the steamer, tuck in some corn husks, so the tamales won’t dance around. Cover with more corn husks, and steam covered for 50 minutes to an hour. You know the tamales are ready when they come easily free from the husks. They will still be moist, and as they are released from the husks, you will see the moistness, like when you remove good moist muffins from their paper baking cups.
  • Finished tamales will stay warm for about 1 to 2 hours in the steamer. They can be made ahead several days before and stored in refrigerator, well wrapped. They can also be frozen for months. In either case, reheat in a steamer. For refrigerated tamales, it will take about 15 minutes, and for frozen tamales about 45 minutes.

Notes

Tamales de Pollo con Salsa Verde

Grilled Cheese and Bean Heroes

molletes pati jinich
Print Recipe
4.6 from 5 votes

Grilled Cheese and Bean Heroes

Grilled Cheese and Bean Heroes recipe from Pati's Mexican Table Season 3, Episode 3 “My Three Favorite Boys”
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time8 mins
Total Time13 mins
Course: Antojos, Main Course
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: Avocado, bacon, bolillo, bread, Chorizo, ham, Monterrey Jack cheese, mozzarella, Mushroom, Oaxaca cheese, Pico de Gallo, refried beans, telera, turkey
Servings: 4 to 6 servings
Author: Pati Jinich

Ingredients

  • 4 teleras, bolillos, Portuguese buns, or baguettes cut into 5- to 6-inch pieces
  • 2 cups refried beans homemade or store-bought
  • 2 cups (about 8 ounces) shredded Oaxaca cheese, mozzarella, Monterrey Jack or mild cheddar
  • Traditional pico de gallo or other salsa of your choice

Optional extra toppings:

  • Mexican-style chorizo crumbled and fried
  • Crisped bacon
  • Turkey or ham
  • Sautéed mushrooms
  • Sliced avocado

Instructions

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F. Slice the bread in half lengthwise. Spread each piece with 3 to 4 tablespoons of refried beans and top with 3 to 4 tablespoons of grated cheese. Arrange the molletes on a baking sheet as you make them. If you want to add more toppings like ham, turkey, bacon or chorizo, sprinkle them on top of the cheese.
  • When they are all assembled, bake until the cheese has melted and the bread has a nice toasted crust on the bottom and around the edges, 8 to 10 minutes. Eat while hot. Serve with pico de gallo, or your favorite salsa, on the side.

Notes

Molletes


Fatal error: Uncaught Error: Call to undefined function pati_paging_nav() in /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-content/themes/pati_new/archive.php:38 Stack trace: #0 /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-includes/template-loader.php(106): include() #1 /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-blog-header.php(19): require_once('/home/patijinic...') #2 /home/patijinich/public_html/index.php(17): require('/home/patijinic...') #3 {main} thrown in /home/patijinich/public_html/wp-content/themes/pati_new/archive.php on line 38